Tag Archives: world

World Antibiotic Awareness Week

World Antibiotic Awareness Week

It’s World Antibiotic Awareness Week. Why should you care about antibiotic resistance?

Why It Matters

 

Reasons for the world antibiotic resistance crisis include:

  • Patients not finishing their full course of antibiotics

What You Can Do as a Patient

 

  • Health workers over-prescribing antibiotics

What You Can Do as a Health Worker

 

  • The overuse of antibiotics in livestock and fish farming

What You Can Do as a Part of Agriculture

 

  • Poor infection control in hospitals and clinics

How Antibiotic Resistance Spreads

 

  • Lack of hygiene and poor sanitation

What You Can Do as a Policy Maker

 

  • Lack of new antibiotics being developed

WHO_HWC_ 6x infographics_22.10.15

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Taste of the World and Other Cultures' Flavors

Taste of the World

Looking for something more adventurous or a meal to impress? Get a taste of the world with healthy recipes from around the globe this week.

First up was a classic, Baked Eggplant Parmesan that is gooey and delicious.

Baked Eggplant Parmesan

 

This Coconut Chicken Thai Curry is rick, hearty, and loaded with veggies.

Coconut Chicken Thai Curry

 

Taiwanese Three Cup Chicken is a popular dish that gets its name from its sauce.

Three Cup Chicken
Image and Recipe via Blue Apron

 

Mole Negro takes time, but is well worth to wait to get an authentic taste of below the border.


Image and Recipe via Bon Appetit

 

These easy Veggie Nori Rolls are a great way to learn to roll your own sushi.

Veggie Nori Rolls
Image and Recipe via The Kitchn

 

Homemade Venezuelan Arepas with Chicken and Avocado are a perfect, filling weekend sandwich.

REINA PEPIADA: VENEZUELAN AREPAS with CHICKEN & AVOCADO

 

Za’atar-Spiced Eggplant and Squash Pitas are a wonderfully seasoned taste of the Lebanese recipe.

Za’atar-Spiced Eggplant and Squash Pitas
Image and Recipe via Blue Apron

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World Immunization Week

World Immunization Week

This year’s World Immunization Week goal was to close the immunization gap around the world, so we had more info daily

Vaccines save between 2 and 3 million lives each year. The first and most important thing you can do is make sure your family is up-to-date.

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This week is also the 20th anniversary National Infant Immunization Week to raise awareness about protecting kids from vaccine preventable diseases. Are your kids up-to-date?

Boy Getting Shot

 

16% of kids around the world aren’t being vaccinated against measles, which lets outbreaks happen. Learn more about why we need vaccines.

Doctor vaccinating small redhead girl.

 

See rates of vaccination for different diseases around the world and learn about where needs help.

Administration of drugs

 

Do you know the myths about #vaccines? Learn more about why they matter and protect your family.

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What programs are we supporting around the world? Learn more about how the CDC is helping.

25 diseases can be prevented by vaccines, and measles deaths dropped 78% as the vaccine spread around the world. Learn more.

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Autism Awareness

National Autism Awareness Month

April is National Autism Awareness Month. So, how do we get from simple awareness to true acceptance? Start by learning more about autism and The Autism NOW National Autism Resource & Information Center.

 

Last year the CDC estimated that 1 in 68 kids in the U.S. have autism, making it clear that it affects millions of Americans. It is affecting your community, so help make a better world for autism.

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Autism is a developmental disability that, in varying amounts, affects social communication, restrictive and repetitive behaviors, interests, or activities. Learn more.

What do people with autism wish you knew? Read their personal stories on The Autism NOW Blog during Autism Awareness Month.

Learning About Autism

 

Catching problems like autism in children early makes a huge difference. Early screening and milestone checklists can help.

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It’s important to break down myths and misinformation to understand and accept what autism really means. Learn about the full range of disorders.

Growing insurance coverage and knowledge about autism helps those that have it, but we can all do more. Get involved.

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Protecting Your Baby with Vaccines

The Importance of Vaccines: Myths vs. Facts

A little boy in Germany has died, the first death in the current measles outbreak. While people take sides about vaccines in the news and politics, the medical world’s feelings are clear.

Vaccines, or immunizations, are a time-tested and scientifically proven way to prevent certain diseases to protect your kids and our society.

What are vaccines?

Vaccines, immunizations, or shots are kinds of drugs you can take to help your immune system. Inside your body, they act like the diseases they’re supposed to prevent and trick your body into producing the kinds of cells it needs to fight a certain disease. By doing this, vaccines teach your body how to beat real infections when they happen.

When enough people are vaccinated, 90 to 95% of the population, it is enough to protect everyone, which helps get rid of diseases altogether.

Inoculation, an early form of vaccines, has been saving lives since the year 1000 in China. And waves of diseases and struggles to find treatments and cures across history have shown that sometimes, vaccines are our first and best form of protection.

Get more history on vaccines and the diseases they fight with this project from The College of Physicians of Philadelphia, The History of Vaccines.  

How well do they work?

Some of the scariest and most painful diseases to ever exist have been nearly wiped out by vaccination. And smallpox, one of the deadliest diseases, has been completely wiped out around the world. By doing so, according to Unicef, we’ve saved approximately 5 million lives each year.

And other diseases, like polio, have been close to being wiped out, too.

According to data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), more than a dozen of the most deadly sicknesses humans have ever seen have been nearly wiped out in the last 200 years since vaccines were made. This infographic from Leon Farrant, also shared in this ThinkProgress article on vaccines, shows their power:

ThinkProgress Vaccine Infographic

Still not convinced? The Wall Street Journal can visually show you the data piece by piece for some of the main diseases your doctor vaccinates you against.

If they work so well, why are we even talking about them?

Diseases that we hadn’t seen much in the last few years, like measles, are making a comeback.

Those diseases are coming back because parents aren’t vaccinating their kids as much as they used to. And once the population falls below that 90 to 95% vaccination rate, those diseases are able to come back. And even with modern medicine, you can still die from them.

So why are parents taking that risk? Because of an old medical study that has been discredited, says The New York Times.

In 1998, a doctor said that he had linked the measles, mumps, rubella (M.M.R.) vaccine and autism in children.

Dozens of scientists and studies proved his work wrong, saying his research was bad since he’d only studied 12 kids, which is a tiny sample when doing scientific research. The British medical authorities even took away his medical license.

This is the only time a link has ever been made between vaccines and autism, and scientists and the medical field proved it wasn’t true. As this Guardian article talks about, later research studies have even made a lot of data disproving a link between the MMR vaccine and autism. Yet the story stuck.

People also worry that vaccines are just being produced by a big company to make money, not to protect patients. But as this New York Times article points out, many doctors lose money by giving you vaccines, and historically, many makers of them have made very little money off them.

As Newsweek points out, some statistics have also been skewed in a negative way. The CDC keeps a database of adverse effects from vaccines, which it’s required to do by law. Since 2004, 69 people have died after getting a measles vaccine. However, not necessarily because of the vaccine. In some cases, their death was completely unrelated, but the reporting system just gives the cold, hard numbers, not the cause-and-effect relationship between patients’ deaths and the vaccine. Numbers like these are sometimes used to convince people that vaccines are dangerous.

But the fact is that vaccines save many lives around the world. According to the World Health Organization (WHO), the measles vaccine alone has saved 15.6 million lives between 2000 and 2016.

The government, your insurance companies, doctors, and pharmacies make vaccines affordable and easy to get for one reason and one reason only: to save lives.

Don’t risk your family or your community. Health Alliance covers immunizations for our members, and we can help you stay up-to-date.

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Deciphering Diabetes

Diabetes 101

Diabetes’ Reach

Diabetes affects 29.1 million people in the U.S., a whopping 9.4% of our population. That number has doubled in the last 10 years. And each year, it costs Americans more than $245 billion.

Worldwide, it affects more than 380 million people.  And the World Health Organization estimates that by 2030, that number of people living with it will more than double.

Diabetes is also the leading cause of blindness, kidney failure, amputations, heart failure, and stroke.

What Is Diabetes?

When you eat food, your body turns it into sugar. Then, your body releases a chemical called insulin, which opens up your cells so they can take in that sugar and turn it into energy.

Diabetes is a group of diseases that breaks that system, causing there to be too much sugar in your blood, or high blood glucose.

Type 1 Diabetes

Type 1 diabetes is normally diagnosed in kids, and it’s the more serious kind. Its is an autoimmune disease where the body attacks the cells that create insulin.

Without insulin, sugar builds up in the blood, starving your cells. This can cause eye, heart, nerve, and kidney damage, and in serious cases, can result in comas and death.

 Type 2 Diabetes

Type 2 diabetes is the most common kind of diabetes, and it’s frequently called adult-onset diabetes because it’s usually diagnosed when you’re over 35.

People with this form of it produce some insulin, just not enough. And sometime, the insulin isn’t able to open the cells, which is called insulin resistance.

While many people with type 2 diabetes are overweight or inactive, there is a new group of patients emerging—young, slim females. Molecular imaging expert Jimmy Bell, MD, calls this condition TOFI, thin outside, fat inside.

Instead of building up below the skin’s surface, fat gathers on their abdominal organs, which is more dangerous. Risk factors for these women include a lack of exercise, daily stress, and yo-yo dieting.

Gestational Diabetes

Some pregnant women who didn’t have diabetes before and won’t have it after develop a form called gestational diabetes.

Your high blood sugar can cause your baby to make too much insulin. When this happens, their cells can absorb too much sugar, which their bodies then store as fat. This can raise their risk of a difficult birth and breathing problems.

Symptoms

Early detection is key to preventing serious complications from diabetes.

These are some common symptoms:

  • Peeing often
  • Feeling very thirsty or hungry, even though you’re eating
  • Extremely tired
  • Blurry vision
  • Cuts or bruises that are slow to heal
  • Weight loss, even though you are eating more (for type 1)
  • Tingling, pain, or numbness in the hands or feet (for type 2)

There are often no symptoms for gestational diabetes, so it’s important to get tested at the right time.

Does any of this sound like you? Learn more about how your doctor can test and diagnose you. And learn more about the different treatments.