Tag Archives: women

National Chronic Fatigue Syndrome Awareness Month

National Chronic Fatigue Syndrome Awareness Month

It’s National Chronic Fatigue Syndrome Awareness Month, and in recent years, chronic fatigue syndrome has been recognized as a serious chronic disease.

Wondering what it’s like to live with chronic fatigue syndrome? This article dives into it.

Living with Chronic Fatigue Syndrome

 

Signs and symptoms of chronic fatigue syndrome include fatigue and extreme exhaustion, loss of memory or concentration, headaches, restless sleep, unexplained joint or muscle pain, and enlarged lymph nodes.

Signs of Chronic Fatigue Syndrome

 

People who have chronic fatigue syndrome can be hypersensitive to even normal exercise and activity and can experience extreme exhaustion more than 24 hours after activity.

Sensitivity to Exercise and Activity

 

Some people’s chronic fatigue syndrome may be triggered by things like viral infections, immune system problems, and hormonal imbalances.

Viral Infection Trigger

 

It is more likely to affect you if you are in your 40s or 50s, are a woman, of have difficulty managing stress. Learn more.

Your Risk of Chronic Fatigue Syndrome

 

Chronic Fatigue Syndrome can increase or contribute to depression, work absences, social isolation, or restrictions on your lifestyle.

Complications of Chronic Fatigue Syndrome

Folic Acid Awareness

National Folic Acid Awareness Week

It’s National Folic Acid Awareness Week, and folic acid is a B vitamin that helps cells grow. Getting enough of it can help prevent birth defects.

Protecting Your Baby with Folic Acid

 

Getting 400 mcg of folic acid a day can help prevent up to 70% of serious birth defects of the brain and spine, like anencephaly and spina bifida.

Preventing Birth Defects

 

Even if you’re not planning on getting pregnant, women should be getting enough folic acid. It helps your body make new, healthy cells every day, like for your hair, skin, and nails.

Healthy Cell Growth from Folic Acid

 

Birth defects of the brain and spine happen in the first few weeks of pregnancy, and half of all pregnancies in the U.S. are unplanned. Getting enough folic acid can help protect your baby even before you know you’re pregnant.

One of the easiest ways to get enough folic acid is to take a daily multivitamin with folic acid. You can also eat foods like enriched breads, pastas, and cereals that have added folic acid.

Folic Acid in Your Vitamins

 

Once you know you’re pregnant, pay careful attention to if you’re getting enough folic acid in your diet. Knowing how to read food labels can help you check for folic acid.

Breaking Down Food Labels

 

You can also eat a diet rich in folate to help get enough folic acid. Foods like beans, lentils, citrus, and dark leafy greens have high amounts of it.

Check out the recipes high in folic acid we also shared this week!

Eating Your Folic Acid

Prostate Health Month

Prostate Health Month

September is Prostate Health Month, and last week was Prostate Cancer Awareness Week. Make sure you get your annual screening before it’s too late.

Your Yearly Preventive Care and Physical

 

Ladies, you’re often the ones who get men to go to the doctor for screenings. When was the last time the men in your life got checked?

Protect the Men in Your Life

 

Prostate cancer kills approximately 30,000 men in the U.S. each year. Know your risk.

Prostate Cancer Death Toll

 

1 in 7 men will be diagnosed with prostate cancer in their lifetime, and African-American men are 1.57 times more likely to develop it. Early detection can help.

At Higher Risk

 

Did you know that BPH (Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia) affects more than half of men over age 60?

BPH and You

 

Limit your risk of prostate cancer by not smoking and by getting regular screenings from your primary care provider (PCP).

Reduce Your Risk

 

Learn more about prostate cancer treatments, or find a walk and give back.

Prostate Cancer Facts

 

PCOS Awareness Month

PCOS Awareness Month

It’s Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome, or PCOS Awareness Month. PCOS is an endocrine disorder that affects 1 in 10 women, more than 7 million total.

Learning About PCOS

 

More women suffer from PCOS than the number of people diagnosed with breast cancer, rheumatoid arthritis, multiple sclerosis, and lupus combined.

Unity in the Face of PCOS

 

With PCOS, many women develop cysts because of a hormonal imbalance. Insulin may also be linked to it.

Insulin Levels

 

PCOS Symptoms can include infertility, abnormal menstrual cycles, weight gain, pain, and more.

PCOS Symptoms

 

Your doctor can perform an exam or tests to check for signs and symptoms of PCOS. Ask about them at your next well-woman visit.

You and Your Well-Woman Visit

 

If you suffer from PCOS, you’re more likely to have serious health problems like diabetes, high blood pressure, high cholesterol, and sleep apnea.

More Serious Health Risks that Go with PCOS

 

There isn’t a cure for PCOS, but your doctor can help you treat it and its symptoms. You can also donate time or money.

PCOS Treatment and Support

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Going to Your Well-Woman Visit

You and Your Well-Woman Visit

Your insurance covers an annual well-woman visit. But what exactly does that mean?

Your yearly well-woman visit can be either a combination of your annual physical and care specific to you as a woman or a separate appointment for just that care.

Preventive Care at Your Well-Woman Visit

Your plan covers a lot of preventive care and screenings, many of which you’ll get at your yearly physical. But for some of the care, you’ll probably want to schedule a separate well-woman visit with a specialist, like a gynecologist, or even multiple appointments with your doctor and different specialists.

Depending on timing and what your doctor recommends, this care includes:

Screenings & Care
  • Osteoporosis screening – For women over age 60, depending on risk factors. Beginning at age 65, you should get this bone density test annually.
  • Domestic and interpersonal violence screening and counseling
Cancer Screenings & Counseling
  • Breast cancer genetic test counseling (BRCA) – For women at higher risk.
  • Breast cancer mammography screenings – Every 1 to 2 years for women starting at age 50 until at least 74. Most clinics require a referral from your primary care provider (PCP) or gynecologist for mammograms.
  • Breast cancer chemoprevention counseling – For women at higher risk.
  • Cervical cancer screening – If you’re between the ages of 21 and 65, your doctor should review your history to choose a Pap smear schedule for you.
Sexually Transmitted Infection (STI) Screenings
  • Sexually transmitted infections counseling – For sexually active women.
  • Chlamydia infection screening – Women age 25 or younger and sexually active should get tested annually. If you’re older, talk to your doctor about being tested.
  • Gonorrhea screening – For all women at higher risk.
  • HIV screening and counseling – For sexually active women.
  • Human Papillomavirus (HPV) DNA test – Every 3 years for women with normal cytology results who are 30 or older.
  • Syphilis screening – For women at increased risk.

And if you’re pregnant or may become pregnant, there’s even more preventive care covered for you.

Prepare for Your Visit

Preparing with questions, and answers to your doctor’s questions, can help you make the most of your visit.

Know Your Family History

Talk to your family members, especially your mom, about your family’s history of women’s health issues. For example, as a woman, you’re more likely to get breast cancer if it’s genetic on your mom’s side of the family. So knowing this information can help your doctor keep an eye out for genetic issues you’re at risk for.

Talk to Your Doctor

Prepare for your appointment by knowing any questions or issues you want to talk to your doctor about. Some things you might want to ask include:

  • What immunizations or shots you need, like the HPV vaccine
  • If you should get STI screenings
  • Help getting pregnant or birth control options
  • How to do self-exams to regularly check for breast cancer
  • Mental and social health concerns, like relationship issues or domestic violence questions
  • Specific issues you might be having, like problems with your menstruation or abnormal pain or cramping

Know What’s Covered

Log in to Your Health Alliance or search by your member number to see what preventive care your plan covers.

Or use our general preventive care guidelines and prescription drugs or our Medicare preventive care guidelines to get an idea of what our plans cover.

If you’re not sure what’s covered and what you’ll need a preauthorization for, you can also check your coverage and preauthorization lists at Your Health Alliance.

Now that you’re ready to go to your well-woman visit, log in to Your Health Alliance to find a covered doctor, or start searching for doctors in our network.

Fibroid Awareness Week

Fibroid Awareness Week

It’s Fibroid Awareness Week. Fibroids are muscular tumors, usually benign, that grow in the wall of the uterus for women.

Fibroids can be as small as an apple seed or as big as a grapefruit. 20% to 80% of women develop them by age 50.

Fibroid Size and Frequency

 

Not all women with fibroids have symptoms, but those who do can have pain, pressure on the bladder, frequent urination, or even a swollen abdomen.

Fibroid Symptoms

 

Risk factors for fibroids include age, family history, ethnic origin, obesity, and eating habits, like eating too much red meat. Eating plenty of green veggies is associated with a lower risk of fibroids.

Risk Factors for Fibroids

 

If you get pregnant and have fibroids, you might have more problems during your pregnancy. OB-GYNs are used to this situation, though, so talk to your doctor about your fibroids when you find out you’re pregnant.

Pregnant with Fibroids

 

Your doctor can diagnose you with fibroids through an exam or imaging tests like ultrasounds, X-rays, MRIs, and CT scans.

Diagnosing Fibroids

 

There are treatments for fibroids, including meds and surgery, if you have pain, they’re large, or you want to get pregnant.

Fibroids and Your Future

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Healthy Hearts Together

National Cholesterol Education Month 2016

It’s National Cholesterol Education Month again! Use the resources of Million Hearts, a national effort to prevent 1 million heart attacks and strokes in the U.S.

Women can make a commitment to protecting their hearts with The Heart Truth.

Pledge Your Heart

 

Subscribe to Heart Insight, the free digital magazine that has great info for heart patients and their families.

Read for Your Heart

 

New innovative cholesterol drugs can be expensive, but they’re making progress for some, via Forbes.

Progress in the Future of Cholesterol Treatment

 

A long-term review of cholesterol-lowering drugs shows just how effective they are, via CBS News.

Statins' Effectiveness

 

Test your Cholesterol IQ with this quiz and make sure you know the facts.

Test Your Heart Knowledge

 

Use this Interactive Cholesterol Guide to brush up on how to protect your heart.

Connect to Your Heart Health

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