Tag Archives: well-woman visit

PCOS Awareness Month

PCOS Awareness Month

It’s Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome, or PCOS Awareness Month. PCOS is an endocrine disorder that affects 1 in 10 women, more than 7 million total.

Learning About PCOS

 

More women suffer from PCOS than the number of people diagnosed with breast cancer, rheumatoid arthritis, multiple sclerosis, and lupus combined.

Unity in the Face of PCOS

 

With PCOS, many women develop cysts because of a hormonal imbalance. Insulin may also be linked to it.

Insulin Levels

 

PCOS Symptoms can include infertility, abnormal menstrual cycles, weight gain, pain, and more.

PCOS Symptoms

 

Your doctor can perform an exam or tests to check for signs and symptoms of PCOS. Ask about them at your next well-woman visit.

You and Your Well-Woman Visit

 

If you suffer from PCOS, you’re more likely to have serious health problems like diabetes, high blood pressure, high cholesterol, and sleep apnea.

More Serious Health Risks that Go with PCOS

 

There isn’t a cure for PCOS, but your doctor can help you treat it and its symptoms. You can also donate time or money.

PCOS Treatment and Support

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Going to Your Well-Woman Visit

You and Your Well-Woman Visit

Your insurance covers an annual well-woman visit. But what exactly does that mean?

Your yearly well-woman visit can be either a combination of your annual physical and care specific to you as a woman or a separate appointment for just that care.

Preventive Care at Your Well-Woman Visit

Your plan covers a lot of preventive care and screenings, many of which you’ll get at your yearly physical. But for some of the care, you’ll probably want to schedule a separate well-woman visit with a specialist, like a gynecologist, or even multiple appointments with your doctor and different specialists.

Depending on timing and what your doctor recommends, this care includes:

Screenings & Care
  • Osteoporosis screening – For women over age 60, depending on risk factors. Beginning at age 65, you should get this bone density test annually.
  • Domestic and interpersonal violence screening and counseling
Cancer Screenings & Counseling
  • Breast cancer genetic test counseling (BRCA) – For women at higher risk.
  • Breast cancer mammography screenings – Every 1 to 2 years for women starting at age 50 until at least 74. Most clinics require a referral from your primary care provider (PCP) or gynecologist for mammograms.
  • Breast cancer chemoprevention counseling – For women at higher risk.
  • Cervical cancer screening – If you’re between the ages of 21 and 65, your doctor should review your history to choose a Pap smear schedule for you.
Sexually Transmitted Infection (STI) Screenings
  • Sexually transmitted infections counseling – For sexually active women.
  • Chlamydia infection screening – Women age 25 or younger and sexually active should get tested annually. If you’re older, talk to your doctor about being tested.
  • Gonorrhea screening – For all women at higher risk.
  • HIV screening and counseling – For sexually active women.
  • Human Papillomavirus (HPV) DNA test – Every 3 years for women with normal cytology results who are 30 or older.
  • Syphilis screening – For women at increased risk.

And if you’re pregnant or may become pregnant, there’s even more preventive care covered for you.

Prepare for Your Visit

Preparing with questions, and answers to your doctor’s questions, can help you make the most of your visit.

Know Your Family History

Talk to your family members, especially your mom, about your family’s history of women’s health issues. For example, as a woman, you’re more likely to get breast cancer if it’s genetic on your mom’s side of the family. So knowing this information can help your doctor keep an eye out for genetic issues you’re at risk for.

Talk to Your Doctor

Prepare for your appointment by knowing any questions or issues you want to talk to your doctor about. Some things you might want to ask include:

  • What immunizations or shots you need, like the HPV vaccine
  • If you should get STI screenings
  • Help getting pregnant or birth control options
  • How to do self-exams to regularly check for breast cancer
  • Mental and social health concerns, like relationship issues or domestic violence questions
  • Specific issues you might be having, like problems with your menstruation or abnormal pain or cramping

Know What’s Covered

Log in to Your Health Alliance or search by your member number to see what preventive care your plan covers.

Or use our general preventive care guidelines and prescription drugs or our Medicare preventive care guidelines to get an idea of what our plans cover.

If you’re not sure what’s covered and what you’ll need a preauthorization for, you can also check your coverage and preauthorization lists at Your Health Alliance.

Now that you’re ready to go to your well-woman visit, log in to Your Health Alliance to find a covered doctor, or start searching for doctors in our network.

Women's Health and Taking Control

National Women’s Health Week

Next week is National Women’s Health Week, so had more info on the subject each day this week.

Are you wondering what steps you should be taking for better health? It’s different for every age. Find out what you should be doing.

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Did you know your annual well-woman visit is covered by your insurance? Don’t let anything stand in the way for getting screened. Things to know about your visit:

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Get active! You can reduce your risk of many diseases by exercising for just 30 minutes a day. So skip that Friends rerun and get busy:

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Your mental health and stress can hurt your physical health, and women are more likely to have anxiety and PTSD (Post Traumatic Stress Disorder)sm. Tips to take care of your brain too:

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Risky actions are unhealthy for you, and your family. Protect them by making smart choices:

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What you put in your body matters, and you have to make those decisions 200 times a day! Make smart ones for better health:

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Take the National Women’s Health Week pledge to join women across the nation who are coming together to take a step towards better health.

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