Tag Archives: walk

Get Ready for Kindergarten Month

Get Ready for Kindergarten Month

August is Get Ready for Kindergarten Month! The first thing to do to make sure your little one is ready to start school is to check out our Summer Health Checklist.

Summer Health Checklist

 

Double-check which shots your little one needs before they start kindergarten.

Your Children’s Preventive Care and Physicals

 

Make sure they’ve had their annual physical before they start. What happens at their next annual well-child appointment? We can help.

Well-Child Visits – Ages 5 to 10

 

Read books with your child to help them get ready for their first day of school.

Read About Kindergarten

 

Walk your child by the school, play on the playground, and if possible, give them a tour to make them feel more secure.

Tour the School

 

Plan their sleep schedule ahead of time so they’ll be adjusted to their new morning schedule for school.

Adjust Their Sleep Schedule

 

If you can, take a practice bus trip or walk through their morning trip with them so they’re ready on the first day of school to tackle getting there.

Practice the Bus Trip

Professional Wellness Month

Professional Wellness Month

It’s Professional Wellness Month, and in honor of it, we have tips for you to maintain a healthy work-life balance and a healthy lifestyle at work.

Don’t let your job stop you from exercising. Even if you can only get out to take a 15-minute walk around the block on a break, getting moving is good for your body and can help clear your mind.

Exercise During the Work-Day

 

Take time for self-care during the week. Spending time on yourself off the clock can improve your performance while you’re on the clock. You can also take time for a class to improve your professional skills.

Time for Self-Care

 

Take time to reconnect with former colleagues and classmates at mixers, on social media, and in person to hear about valuable knowledge and insights they’ve gained since you saw them last.

Try taking a mini-break from technology and screens over the weekend. It might be hard at first, but once you get used to it, it can be relaxing and raise your awareness of your surroundings.

Technology Break

 

Make sure you use vacations to refresh your mind and body. Choose a good mix of relaxing, invigorating, and intriguing activities in your time away.

Refresh on Vacation

 

If you work a desk job, your posture may be causing back and neck pain. Try to keep good posture, adjust your computer or chair height to ease the angle, and get up and stretch when you’re feeling sore.

Your Posture at Work

 

Get used to light lunches and try out meal prep. Eating big meals in the middle of the day can make you feel sluggish, so try to eat a mix of fresh produce and light protein to fuel the day.

Light Lunches During Work

Well-Child Visits

Well-Child Visits – Ages 1 to 4

Getting your kids to their well-child visits helps them be their healthiest. These visits with your doctor are for a full checkup to make sure they’re healthy and developing normally. This is different from other visits for sickness or injury.

Your child needs to go to these visits at:

  • 12 months old
  • 15 months old (1 year and 3 months old)
  • 18 months old (1 year and 6 months old)
  • 2 years old
  • 2 years and 6 months old
  • 3 years old
  • 4 years old

What Happens at Well-Child Visits

Your child needs to have regular well-child visits with their doctor to focus on their development, health, and wellness. At the appointment, some of the basics your doctor will cover are:

  • Checking that your child is developing at a healthy rate and tracking their history
  • Getting a physical exam
  • Staying up to date with their preventive care
  • Getting education and counseling
  • If needed, setting health goals

Your Child’s Development

Your child’s doctor can help you keep track of your child’s key developmental milestones, which can include physical, mental, social, and language skills.

At each visit, your doctor will ask you questions to help make sure your child is reaching milestones on schedule. This can help them recognize signs of problems early on, and put your mind at ease.

Each child grows differently. Some kids take longer to start talking than others. Most of these aren’t a sign that something’s wrong. Your doctor can help you understand what differences could be because of something serious.

By 12 months, most kids:

  • Have started to get their teeth in
  • Stand up by pulling on furniture
  • Walk with help or on their own
  • Copy animal noises
  • Say mama and dad and maybe a few other words
  • Can follow simple directions

See more milestones for 12-month-olds.

By 15 months, most kids:

  • Bend to the floor without falling
  • Can put blocks in a container
  • Make scribbles
  • Bring and show toys to you
  • Listen to stories and look at pictures

By 18 months, most kids:

  • Walk up steps
  • Run or try to run
  • Climb onto low furniture or chairs without help
  • Build short block towers
  • Use spoons and cups
  • Take off socks and hats
  • Point towards things they want
  • Play simple pretend, like feeding a doll

See more milestones for 18-month-olds.

By 2 years, most kids:

  • Have 16 or more teeth
  • Stand on tiptoe
  • Kick a ball
  • Can tell you they’re hungry or thirsty
  • Understand instructions with 2 steps
  • Copy others
  • Name things in a picture book

See more milestones for 2-year-olds.

By 2 years and 6 months, most kids:

  • Can point to different body parts when asked
  • Play simple games with other kids
  • Brush their teeth with help
  • Jump up and down in place
  • Put on clothing, although they may still need help

By 3 years, most kids:

  • Have all 20 of their baby teeth
  • Use the toilet during the day
  • Can copy simple shapes while drawing
  • Put one foot on each step to walk up the stairs
  • Speak in short sentences
  • Ask questions
  • Know their name, age, and if they’re a boy or girl

See more milestones for 3-year-olds.

By 4 years, most kids:

  • Hop on one foot or balance for a short time
  • Can use child-safe scissors
  • Count to 4 or higher
  • Ask a lot of questions
  • Play with imaginary friends
  • Can name some colors
  • Play simple board and card games

See more milestones for 4-year-olds.

Health Information & History

At well-child visits, your doctor will ask you to answer some questions about your kid’s health, and maybe even your family history.

  • Health questions, like:

    • Do they ever complain of headaches, stomachaches, or other kinds of pain?
    • Do they have trouble breathing?

  • Eating habit questions, like:

    • What do they eat on a normal day?

  • Activity questions, like:

    • Do they play pretend and how?

  • Safety questions, like:

    • Do they ride in a car seat?

  • And family questions, like:

    • Have there been any changes in the family, like a new sibling?

Physical Exam

At your child’s appointments, you can expect their doctor to:

  • Measure their height, weight, and blood pressure
  • Check their body and limbs
  • Take their temperature
  • Check their vision
  • Give them any shots or screenings they need

Education, Counseling & Health Goals

Your child’s doctor can help you with important information about caring for your child, managing any conditions or diseases they might have, and preventing future problems.

Their doctor might have valuable handouts, websites, and advice to help or might want to refer you to a specialist who can help with specific issues further.

Their doctor can also help you set health goals to maintain or improve your child’s health, like maintaining a healthy weight.

Prepare for Well-Child Visits

Preparing yourself with questions to ask and answers to your doctor’s questions can help you make the most of your well-child visits.

Know Your Family and Child’s History

Make sure you bring any medical records you have that the doctor might not, especially to a first appointment with a new doctor, like a record of shots and screening results.

You should also make a list of any important changes in your child’s life, like being sick or hurt, changing caregivers, or starting daycare.

Your family’s history of health and wellness is also an important part of your child’s health record. Histories of illness and disease can help doctors look out for issues that run in families and more.

This family health history tool can help you track your family’s health, so that you’re always organized to talk to your child’s doctor. Not sure about your family history? Filling this out is the perfect time to talk to family members for firsthand details.

Talk to Your Doctor

Prepare for your well-child visits by knowing any questions or issues you want to talk about ahead of time. Some things you might want to ask about:

  • Worries about their development
  • Growth and normal development
  • Sleep schedule
  • Getting enough physical activity
  • Healthy weight
  • Getting them to try different foods
  • Getting siblings to get along
  • Disciplining them
  • Screen time
  • Preventive care they need
  • What to do if they get sick

Know What’s Covered

Learn more about what immunizations are covered for your children. And log in to Your Health Alliance or search by your or your child’s member number to see what children’s preventive care your family’s plan covers.

You can use our general preventive care guidelines and prescription drugs to get an idea of what our plans cover.

If you’re not sure what’s covered and what you’ll need a preauthorization for, you can check your coverage and preauthorization lists at Your Health Alliance.

Now that you’re ready for your children’s physicals, log in to Your Health Alliance if you need to set a Primary Care Provider (PCP) for your child or start searching for doctors in our network.

National Ovarian Cancer Month

National Ovarian Cancer Month

September is National Ovarian Cancer Month, and there’s still time for you to learn more and get involved.

1 in 75 women will get ovarian cancer in their lifetime.

Pap tests can’t tell you if you have ovarian cancer, so know the symptoms and talk to your doctor.

Know Ovarian

 

Symptoms include bloating, trouble eating or feeling full too fast, the need to urinate often, and abdominal pain.

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90% of those diagnosed and treated in the early stages of ovarian cancer survive.

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Find ways to raise awareness, take action, learn more, and shop to give back.

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Find a run or walk to get moving to fight ovarian cancer.

Ovarian Cancer Walk

 

Get support and share your story as an ovarian cancer survivor, and find caregiver resources.

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Discovering Effective Alzheimer's Disease Treatments

National Alzheimer’s Disease Awareness Month

This month is National Alzheimer’s Disease Awareness Month. Take the Purple Pledge to support people facing it today.

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The first trial that’s trying to prevent Alzheimer’s before symptoms start is happening now from BBC News.

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It’s important to know the signs of Alzheimer’s to protect yourself and your loved ones.

Intelligence Therapy

 

This touching story from the New York Times Magazine will remind you why we must end Alzheimer’s.

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Find facts and figures and resources, or find a walk to support a cure.

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Studies like this one are working hard to figure what exactly causes Alzheimer’s, from The Economist.

MRI Image Brain On Black Background

Doctors and scientists are getting close to effective treatments in the journey to end Alzheimer’s, from Forbes.

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Spring at the Park

Long View: Savor Spring at a Public Park

Well, we survived another winter, and the weather is giving us a break now that spring is upon us. I don’t know if you felt cooped up, but I certainly did. I need to plan some outdoor recreation, but the question is what and where?

Last year, I was on the road and visited Marshall, IL. Jennifer Bishop is the director of the Marshall Chamber of Commerce, and I asked her if she had a recommendation for someplace peaceful to have a quick lunch. She said I should consider the dining room at Lincoln Trail State Park. It was nearby, so I checked it out.

The restaurant looked out over a 146-acre lake and a boat dock. There were hummingbird feeders hanging just outside the windows, and they were very active with birds. The food was simple and well prepared, and the staff could not have been nicer. They even deliver dinners to the campground for free, believe it or not.

Lincoln Trail State Park offers a number of activities, including camping, fishing, picnicking, and boating. After a very affordable lunch, I enjoyed a short hike along the side of the lake. It was beautiful.

The experience got me thinking about what a great asset we have in our state parks. They offer a wide range of outdoor activities; they are well maintained and always affordable. I did a search and found our state parks to be accessible and conveniently located, perfect for someone like me who could use some exercise and fresh air.

I told Jennifer at the Chamber how much I enjoyed my experience at the park and she told me, “It’s a hidden gem. I love telling visitors about hidden gems in our community. The locals forget about its simplistic beauty and number of activities. We are so lucky to have it in our backyard. My family loves to take advantage of it any chance we get.”

There you have it. We are all supporting our state parks with our tax dollars, and I for one will take better advantage of them this year. Some fresh air and a brisk walk are only a few of the possibilities. Lincoln Trail also offers winter sporting opportunities, like ice fishing and skating (weather permitting). But after last winter, I think I’ll pass on the cold activities.

You can check out other tips for getting healthy and moving more on the Health & Wellness section of our site.

Helping Heart Disease

Vantage Point: Walk to Mend Hearts

As a child, I folded and cut red, heart-shaped Valentine’s Day cards. As a teenager, I experienced my first broken heart. And as adults, we learn the importance of taking care of our hearts by eating right, exercising, and avoiding damaging habits, like smoking, to avoid heart disease.

Heart disease, a disorder of the heart and blood vessels, affects people of all ages and is the number one killer of women. You should also know about atrial fibrillation (AFib) and stroke. AFib is where upper chambers of the heart beat irregularly, causing dizziness, fainting and a racing, pounding sensation. Stroke is a brain attack that occurs when blood clots block an artery or blood vessel, interrupting blood flow to the brain. People with AFib are five times more likely to have a stroke.

People diagnosed with heart problems may feel overwhelmed, anxious, and afraid, opening the door for depression. That’s where Greater Wenatchee Mended Hearts, a volunteer peer-to-peer support organization, comes in to inspire hope through people who are heart patients themselves. I recently had the privilege to attend one of Mended Hearts’ monthly meetings. The room was buzzing with encouragement. Mended Hearts also hosts educational speakers and sends monthly newsletters full of valuable information about heart disease.

One of the most valuable aspects of Mended Hearts is its Heart Patient Visiting Room program that lets heart patients meet other people who have gone through or are going through the same thing. Natalie Noyd, director of the cardiovascular service line at Confluence Health, says peer support coming from someone who has walked the walk helps heart disease patients feel they can get through the experience and aids the overall recovery process. Confluence Health and Mended Hearts work together, mutually spreading heart disease awareness and education, and helping patients, throughout North Central Washington.

Health Alliance provides therapy to help reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease and also offers rehab and testing. Sometimes heart disease runs in the family, so creating habits to help prevent the disease becomes extra important for people with a family history of heart problems. Health Alliance encourages you to learn more by joining the Go Red for Women Heart & Sole Walk on February 6 in various locations throughout Wenatchee.

Walks will also take place at Confluence Health Clinics in Omak and Moses Lake. To learn more about Mended Hearts, call Ann at 509-679-8181 or email mendedhearts91@frontier.com.