Tag Archives: vets

PTSD Awareness Month

PTSD Awareness Month

It’s PTSD Awareness Month, and PTSD, or post-traumatic stress disorder, is an anxiety problem certain people suffer from caused by traumatic events like combat or a serious accident.

Understanding PTSD

 

Those suffering from PTSD may relive the event with overwhelming memories, flashbacks, or nightmares that disrupt their day-to-day lives.

PTSD Symptoms

 

Veterans are some of the U.S. citizens most likely to suffer from PTSD.

Veterans and PTSD

 

Homeless vets today are even more likely to be haunted by PTSD than veterans of previous eras were.

The Homeless Vets and PTSD Connection

 

Injured soldiers’ sleep issues can be key to improving their rehabilitation and issues with PTSD.

Sleep Issues and PTSD

 

Consider these issues and guidelines if you’re wondering about seeing a therapist for your PTSD.

Learn more about PTSD, its symptoms, treatment, and how to get more help.

PTSD Support and Help

Brain Injury Awareness Month

Brain Injury Awareness Month

It’s Brain Injury Awareness Month, and every 9 seconds, someone sustains a brain injury. Learn more about brain injuries.

Brain Injuries

 

Acquired brain injuries (ABIs) are ones that aren’t hereditary or from a degenerative disease. These can be caused by infection, electric shocks, nearly drowning, stroke, seizures, tumors, substance abuse, and overdose. 

Traumatic brain injuries (TBIs) are from a trauma to the brain, and every day, 137 people die of TBI-related injuries. At least 5.3 million Americans live with a TBI-related disability.

Traumatic Brain Injuries

 

Opioid addictions and overdoses can cause permanent brain injuries and disabilities.

Opioids and Brain Injuries

 

Strokes are brain injuries that can permanently alter your life. Learn more about preventing strokes.

Preventing Strokes

 

Concussions are brain injuries, and without treatment, they can cause serious problems. But a better way to detect them might be on the way.

Concussions' Effects on the Brain

 

More than 13,000 service members and veterans are diagnosed with TBIs, and knowing the signs is key to getting help.

Military and Vet Brain Injuries

Honoring the Fallen's Legacy

Vantage Point: A Salute to Independence

Recently, I met Eric Fritts, Okanogan County’s Veteran Service Officer, and he invited me to stop in to tour the U.S. Armed Forces Legacy Project of Tonasket, WA, on my next trip north.

I have driven past the prestigious site many times, and the red, white, and blue American flag blowing regally in the wind, surrounded by the 5 tall rock pillars representing the Army, Navy, Air Force, Marines, and Coast Guard, all encircled by 8 walls of plaques honoring veterans always takes my breath away.

Stepping out of my car, I could not help but feel I was on revered ground. The intimacy of the artwork, the absolute pride of craftsmanship reflected in every piece honoring each branch of the United States military, was so thought out.

Unlike a memorial, a legacy accepts the names of living veterans in addition to those who have died. It is both a project and an organization with the specific purpose of building and maintaining a tribute to America’s past, present, and future veterans.

Its mission is to serve veterans and members of our armed forces by honoring all those who gave, including those who gave their all, on their walls, by housing a military library, and by guiding them and their families through their complicated benefits with the help of a service officer like Eric.

As I walked through the library, I got to overhear Eric helping an older gentleman set up his wellness account online. “What kindergarten did you attend?” Eric asked to set up his profile.

“I didn’t go to kindergarten,” the vet said.

“Well, that explains a lot,” teased his friend.

It was a moment that perfectly illustrated the atmosphere of the legacy, which draws the vets in and makes them comfortable accepting Eric’s expertise and help with navigating their benefits. Eric is a veteran himself, and he helps make them feel at home there.

While walking through the grounds, I met a woman who was tending them meticulously. I learned she was the wife of one of the founders and had served as a nurse in Vietnam. Her pride in the site was quiet but profound.

Thanking her for her service, I asked her what it meant to donate her time to the site. She simply replied, “Healing.”

Health Alliance hopes you enjoy the Fourth of July fireworks, and as you celebrate America’s independence, that you also pause to appreciate the brave and humble men and women who are unselfishly willing to give their all.

Shannon Sims is a Medicare community liaison for Health Alliance, serving Chelan, Douglas, Grant, and Okanogan counties in Washington. During her time off she enjoys spending time with her family and riding horses.        

Mental Illness Awareness Week

Mental Illness Awareness Week

This week on social media, we gave you some staggering facts and information on mental health for Mental Illness Awareness Week and Suicide Prevention Awareness Month.

  • 1 in 4 adults, 61.5 million Americans, experiences mental illness in a given year. One in 17, about 13.6 million, live with a serious illness such as schizophrenia, depression, or bipolar disorder. With statistics like those, you probably know someone suffering.
  • Approximately 20% of kids ages 13-18 experience severe mental disorders in a given year.
  • 70% of the youths in juvenile justice systems have at least one mental health condition, and 20% live with a severe mental illness.
  • Approximately 1.1% of American adults, or 6.1 million people, live with bipolar disorder.
  • Approximately 6.7% of American adults, or about 14.8 million people, live with major depression.
  • 18.1% of American adults, or 42 million people live with anxiety disorders such as panic disorder, OCD, PTSD, and phobias.
  • About 9.2 million adults have reoccurring mental health and addiction disorders.
  • 26% of homeless adults live with serious mental illness, and 46% live with severe mental illness and/or substance abuse disorders.
  • Approximately 20% of state prisoners and 21% of local jail prisoners have a “recent history” of mental health conditions.
  • Approximately 60% percent of adults and half the youth with a mental illness got no help for it in the last year.
  • Mood disorders like depression are the 3rd most common cause of hospitalization in the U.S. for both youths and adults.
  • Serious mental illness costs America $193.2 billion in lost earnings per year.
  • Suicide is the 10th leading cause of death in the U.S. above homicide, and the 3rd leading cause of death for ages 15 to 24.
  • Military members are less than 1% of the population, but vets represent 20% of suicide. Each day 22 vets die from suicide.

You can help, and you can get help.