Tag Archives: vaccine

National Cancer Control Month

National Cancer Control Month

April is National Cancer Control Month. Prevention and screenings are the best way to fight cancer.

Are you still using tobacco? It’s a leading cause of cancer, and we can help members quit.

Quit to Avoid Cancer

 

The HPV vaccine can help prevent cervical cancer. Make sure your teens are getting vaccinated.

Protect Your Kids From Cancer This Back-to-School Season

 

Taking care of your skin now is an easy way to help prevent cancer later.

Skin Cancer Awareness Month

 

Get your mammogram now to catch breast cancer early.

Your Yearly Preventive Care and Physical

 

A screening can help you prevent colorectal cancer. Learn more about your covered preventive care.

A Cancer You Can Help Prevent with Screening

 

Get the facts about cervical cancer and learn more about protecting yourself.

Cervical Health Awareness Month 2016

 

Learn more about preventing prostate cancer and your prostate’s health.

Prostate Health Month

Pregnancy Health Problems

Pregnancy Health Problems

If you have a preexisiting health problem or develop a new one during your pregnancy, you may need more care. Pregnancy health problems that can occur include:

Blood Pressure Related Conditions

While your blood pressure is always an important part of your overall health, when you’re pregnant, it becomes even more important to monitor it. High blood pressure can constrict the blood vessels in your uterus that supply your baby with oxygen and nutrients.

Chronic Hypertension

This is high blood pressure before you become pregnant. If you have it, it won’t go away after you deliver.

There are usually no signs, the only way to diagnose it is with blood pressure monitoring.

Your doctor may prescribe medication or liestyle changes. If you’re already on hypertension meds, talk to your doctor before trying to conceive. ACE inhibitors, a common kind of blood pressure meds, can be bad for your baby.

Pregnancy-Induced Hypertension (PIH)

Some women develop high blood pressure about 20 weeks into their pregnancy. PIH will usually go away after you deliver.

There are usually no signs, the only way to diagnose it is with blood pressure monitoring.

PIH can be controlled with meds during pregnancy.

Preeclampsia

This is high blood pressure and protein in your urine that usually develops after 30 weeks. 25% of women who have PIH develop this too.

There are usually no signs, the only way to diagnose it is with blood pressure monitoring.

Preeclampsia can be controlled with meds during pregnancy.

HELLP syndrome

This is a variation of preeclampsia that’s diagnosed by blood tests. It stands for the conditions you develop:

  • Hemolytic anemia
  • Elevated liver enzymes
  • Low platelets

Most women with HELLP have high blood pressure, and other symptoms include fatigue, severe headaches, nausea, vomiting, and swelling.

The only treatment is to deliver your baby. HELLP is very serious and requires care from a doctor.

Gestational Diabetes

Even if you don’t have diabetes before you get pregnant, you can develop gestational diabetes. It will go away after you have your baby, but during your pregnancy, you may be required to follow a special diet, exercise, or take insulin.

Environmental Risk

Certain substances can be harmful to your baby, raising the risk of birth defects and miscarriage. Chemicals to avoid include:

  • Cigarette smoke
  • Lead in water or paint
  • Some cleaners
  • Pesticides
  • Mercury in tuna and other fish
  • Cat litter boxes

Talk to your doctor about how to avoid these chemicals and what to do if you come in contact with any of them.

Chicken Pox

While most women are immune if they’ve had chicken pox or the vaccine before, it can be dangerous if you catch it while pregnant. Tell your doctor right away if you come in contact with someone who has it or if you believe you have it.

HIV/AIDS

You can pass HIV/AIDS to your baby during pregnancy, labor, or delivery if you already have it. You can take meds to protect your baby during your pregnancy, just talk to your doctor about it.

Sexually Transmitted Infections (STIs)

If you have an STI, it can cause your baby to be born blind, deaf, or even stillborn. Medication can usually help protect your baby during pregnancy and delivery. Tell your doctor right away if you have an STI or develop one while you are pregnant.

Prepare for Camping Safety

Camping Safety

It’s National Camping Month, so we had some camping safety tips to keep you safe on your big trips this summer.

Make sure you get vaccinated before your next camping trip to protect against diseases.

When you’re packing to camp, make sure you separate raw and cooked food in waterproof containers and keep them in a cooler.

Packing Smart

 

Put together a camping first aid kit with this list from the American Red Cross.

Be Prepared

 

These tips can help you set up your tent safely.

10 Tent Tips for Happy Camping
Image via Brandon Gaille

 

Avoid carbon monoxide poisoning by never using fuel-burning equipment in an enclosed shelter and don’t set up your tent too close to the campfire.

Cooking Smart When Camping

 

Protect yourself from poisonous plants while hiking.

How to Prevent Contact with Poisonous Plants
Image via Fix.com

 

Use insect repellent with DEET to fight mosquitos and ticks to avoid bites and some diseases.

Protect Yourself While Camping

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HPV & Cervical Health Awareness Month

Cervical Health Awareness Month 2016

January is Cervical Health Awareness Month. How much do you really know about preventing this cancer? Take this quiz to find out.

Cervical Cancer Quiz

 

Get the facts about cervical cancer, like the risks, symptoms, and prevention.

Cervical Health

 

Lower your risk of getting HPV, the most common sexually transmitted disease. Find out how.

HPV is a very common infection that can affect both sexes. Find out how HPV affects men.

Prevent HPV

 

Ask your child’s doctor about the HPV vaccine! Both boys and girls need it at age 11 or 12.

Falling Back Into School

 

You can help prevent cervical cancer by getting regular screenings, called Pap tests, and follow-up care.

Cervical Screenings Infographic

 

Think cervical cancer could never happen to you? This young woman’s podcast talks about what happens when it does.

What Happens When It Does

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National Influenza Vaccination Week

National Influenza Vaccination Week

This week was National Influenza Vaccination Week. The flu shot is the best tool to protect you and your family.

Struggling Through the Flu

 

The flu causes millions of illnesses, hundreds of thousands of hospitalizations, and thousands of deaths every season. Get your shot today!

Avoid Getting Sick with the Shot

 

More than 132.7 million people have already gotten their flu shots. If your kids are over 6 months, protect them now!

Protect Your Kids From the Flu

 

Flu shots are the best way to avoid seasonal doctors’ visits, missed work and school, and to prevent hospitalizations.

Avoid Flu Season Woes

 

The flu can be a serious danger to your health, especially to those under 6 months old, pregnant women, and the elderly. Protect yourself now!

Our blogger overcame her fear of the flu shot. Let her story remind you why you need yours.

As a Health Alliance member, your flu shot is covered, so there’s no reason not to get yours today!

You're Covered, So Feel Better!

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HPV Vaccine for Back-to-School

Protect Your Kids From Cancer This Back-to-School Season

In 2015, about 12,900 new cases of invasive cervical cancer will be diagnosed, according to the American Cancer Society. And about 4,100 women will die from their cervical cancer this year.

But you can help save your daughters from this fate by making sure they get the HPV vaccine.

HPV and Cancer

HPV, or human papillomavirus, is the most common sexually transmitted infection, and it causes many health problems. In fact, nearly all sexually active adults will get it at some point in their lives, says the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

There are many different types of the virus, and while some may cause no problems and go away, others cause warts, cervical, vaginal, vulvar, penile, anal, and oral cancer in women or men.

In fact, the HPV infection causes 5% of all cancers worldwide, and 10,000 Americans die from cancers caused by HPV each year, according to The New York Times. And 14 million new cases of HPV are diagnosed in the U.S. each year.

HPV can cause cancer years or even decades after you first get HPV and can be spread to others that whole time, even when you have no symptoms. There is no way to know which people with HPV will develop cancer and other problems.

Debunking Concerns About the HPV Vaccine

The vaccine targets the kinds of HPV that most commonly cause cervical cancer. Gardasil also protects against the kind that causes warts. And just this year in March, the Federal Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and CDC approved a new version of the vaccine that protects against 9 different strains of HPV.

While the vaccine can literally prevent cancer and has been proven highly effective, its use isn’t as widespread as the virus it protects against.

Some worry about the safety of the vaccine. It is fully endorsed by the FDA and CDC, which continue to closely monitor the vaccine’s safety. And it has very mild side effects, such as:

• Arm pain or redness where the shot was given
• Dizziness
• Fainting
• Nausea
• Headache

When the side effects of HPV are cancer, these seem like a minor risk to protect your kids’ futures.

Others have worried that the vaccine will promote sexual behavior, especially unsafe behavior. But as this U.S. News article discusses, a study from early this year shows that the vaccine hasn’t influenced these behaviors in women.

Protecting Your Kids

The HPV vaccine is safe, effective, and highly recommended by your doctors. The HPV vaccine is just as important for your kids as vaccines that protect against diseases like mumps and measles.

The vaccine is a series of 3 shots recommended for girls AND boys between the ages of 11 and 12 but can be given anytime between the ages of 9 and 26. However, the earlier they get it, the more likely they are to be protected.

Talk to your doctor about giving your kids the HPV vaccine during back-to-school checkups and sports physicals this year. When cancer is on the line, protecting your kids now is always the best plan.

 

Health Alliance covers HPV vaccinations.