Tag Archives: uterus

Pregnancy Health Problems

Pregnancy Health Problems

If you have a pre-exisiting health problem or develop a new one during your pregnancy, you may need more care. Pregnancy health problems that can occur include:

Blood Pressure Related Conditions

While your blood pressure is always an important part of your overall health, when you’re pregnant, it becomes even more important to monitor it. High blood pressure can constrict the blood vessels in your uterus that supply your baby with oxygen and nutrients.

Chronic Hypertension

This is high blood pressure before you become pregnant. If you have it, it won’t go away after you deliver.

There are usually no signs, the only way to diagnose it is with blood pressure monitoring.

Your doctor may prescribe medication or liestyle changes. If you’re already on hypertension meds, talk to your doctor before trying to conceive. ACE inhibitors, a common kind of blood pressure meds, can be bad for your baby.

Pregnancy-Induced Hypertension (PIH)

Some women develop high blood pressure about 20 weeks into their pregnancy. PIH will usually go away after you deliver.

There are usually no signs, the only way to diagnose it is with blood pressure monitoring.

PIH can be controlled with meds during pregnancy.

Preeclampsia

This is high blood pressure and protein in your urine that usually develops after 30 weeks. 25% of women who have PIH develop this too.

There are usually no signs, the only way to diagnose it is with blood pressure monitoring.

Preeclampsia can be controlled with meds during pregnancy.

HELLP syndrome

This is a variation of preeclampsia that’s diagnosed by blood tests. It stands for the conditions you develop:

  • Hemolytic anemia
  • Elevated liver enzymes
  • Low platelets

Most women with HELLP have high blood pressure, and other symptoms include fatigue, severe headaches, nausea, vomiting, and swelling.

The only treatment is to deliver your baby. HELLP is very serious and requires care from a doctor.

Gestational Diabetes

Even if you don’t have diabetes before you get pregnant, you can develop gestational diabetes. It will go away after you have your baby, but during your pregnancy, you may be required to follow a special diet, exercise, or take insulin.

Environmental Risk

Certain substances can be harmful to your baby, raising the risk of birth defects and miscarriage. Chemicals to avoid include:

  • Cigarette smoke
  • Lead in water or paint
  • Some cleaners
  • Pesticides
  • Mercury in tuna and other fish
  • Cat litter boxes

Talk to your doctor about how to avoid these chemicals and what to do if you come in contact with any of them.

Chicken Pox

While most women are immune if they’ve had chicken pox or the vaccine before, it can be dangerous if you catch it while pregnant. Tell your doctor right away if you come in contact with someone who has it or if you believe you have it.

HIV/AIDS

You can pass HIV/AIDS to your baby during pregnancy, labor, or delivery if you already have it. You can take meds to protect your baby during your pregnancy, just talk to your doctor about it.

Sexually Transmitted Infections (STIs)

If you have an STI, it can cause your baby to be born blind, deaf, or even stillborn. Medication can usually help protect your baby during pregnancy and delivery. Tell your doctor right away if you have an STI or develop one while you are pregnant.

Fibroid Awareness Week

Fibroid Awareness Week

It’s Fibroid Awareness Week. Fibroids are muscular tumors, usually benign, that grow in the wall of the uterus for women.

Fibroids can be as small as an apple seed or as big as a grapefruit. 20% to 80% of women develop them by age 50.

Fibroid Size and Frequency

 

Not all women with fibroids have symptoms, but those who do can have pain, pressure on the bladder, frequent urination, or even a swollen abdomen.

Fibroid Symptoms

 

Risk factors for fibroids include age, family history, ethnic origin, obesity, and eating habits, like eating too much red meat. Eating plenty of green veggies is associated with a lower risk of fibroids.

Risk Factors for Fibroids

 

If you get pregnant and have fibroids, you might have more problems during your pregnancy. OB-GYNs are used to this situation, though, so talk to your doctor about your fibroids when you find out you’re pregnant.

Pregnant with Fibroids

 

Your doctor can diagnose you with fibroids through an exam or imaging tests like ultrasounds, X-rays, MRIs, and CT scans.

Diagnosing Fibroids

 

There are treatments for fibroids, including meds and surgery, if you have pain, they’re large, or you want to get pregnant.

Fibroids and Your Future
Fighting for Endometriosis Awareness Month

Endometriosis Awareness Month

March is Endometriosis Awareness Month. Endometriosis is a disorder in which tissue that normally lines the uterus grows outside the uterus.

What is Endometriosis?

 

Endometriosis affects 176 million women from 15 to 49 years old worldwide.

The Reach of Endometriosis

 

Endometriosis isn’t caused by your lifestyle, but the severe pain it causes can hurt your quality of life.

Hurting Your Quality of Life

 

28% of women with endometriosis suffer from infertility.

Fighting the Effects of Endometriosis

 

Women with endometriosis usually aren’t diagnosed for 7 to 11 years, preventing many from having kids or living normal lives.

Identifying Endometriosis

 

Women usually see 7 doctors before endometriosis treatment starts. Raising awareness of what’s normal in teens and women can help!

Find a march or host a Yellow Tutu Tea Party and help fight endometriosis.

Make a Difference in Endometriosis
HPV & Cervical Health Awareness Month

Cervical Health Awareness Month 2016

January is Cervical Health Awareness Month. How much do you really know about preventing this cancer? Take this quiz to find out.

Cervical Cancer Quiz

 

Get the facts about cervical cancer, like the risks, symptoms, and prevention.

Cervical Health

 

Lower your risk of getting HPV, the most common sexually transmitted disease. Find out how.

HPV is a very common infection that can affect both sexes. Find out how HPV affects men.

Prevent HPV

 

Ask your child’s doctor about the HPV vaccine! Both boys and girls need it at age 11 or 12.

You can help prevent cervical cancer by getting regular screenings, called Pap tests, and follow-up care.

Cervical Screenings Infographic

 

Think cervical cancer could never happen to you? This young woman’s podcast talks about what happens when it does.

What Happens When It Does