Tag Archives: unhealthy

Coping with Eating Disorders

Eating Disorders Awareness Week

This week was Eating Disorders Awareness Week, so we gave you facts about the mental illness each day and advice on how to build a healthy relationship with food.

Eating disorders are mental illnesses that cause unhealthy relationships with food, and approximately 24 million people in the U.S. struggle with one. Find help.

Eating Disorders

 

50% of people with eating disorders also suffer from depression, and only 10% of people with them get treatment. Find help.

Depression and Eating Disorders

 

91% of women said they controlled their weight through dieting, and 22% said they dieted “often” or “always.” Find help.

Unhealthy Dieting

 

Men make up 10-15% of those with anorexia and bulimia, but are the least likely to get help. Find help.

Men and Eating Disorders

 

69% of girls ages 10-18 say that models and celebrities in magazines inspired their ideal body shape, and more than 50% of teen girls will smoke, skip meals, fast, or vomit to control their weight. Find help.

Setting Unhealthy Expectations

 

An estimated 25% of college-age girls binge and purge to manage their weight, and 58% say they felt social pressure to maintain a certain size. Find help.

Food Binging

 

Eating disorders have the highest mortality rate of any mental illness. For women ages 15-24, the mortality rate of anorexia is 12 times higher than any other cause of death. Find help.

Death by Eating Disorder

 

First up to building a healthy relationship with food was some advice from Lori Lieberman, a dietitian who works with people suffering from eating disorders. She recommends planning in advance. Even if you don’t prepare food ahead, having a mental plan of what you’re going to eat it can make mealtime easier.

Making a Plan

 

Lieberman also recommends mixing in foods you enjoy but think of as forbidden to avoid overeating and make eating enjoyable. See more of her advice for those rebuilding their relationships with food after eating disorders.

Indulge in "Bad" Foods

 

Focus on healthy fats, like avocado, salmon, and olive oil, which fill you up and are good for you.

Healthy Fats

 

Make sure you and your family eat breakfast! It’s good for you, and improves focus during the morning at school and work. See more tips for helping your kids build a healthy relationship with food.

Healthy Breakfast

 

Drink plenty of water instead of soda, even diet. You could eat a filling snack instead for the number of calories in a can of pop!

Drink More Water

 

Take time to chew your food. Studies show that eating slowly actually makes you feel full sooner. Get more tips.

Chew Your Food!

 

Remember that no food is actually bad. Building a healthy relationship with food, one that lets you have anything in moderation, lets you make healthy choices in any situation. Learn more.

Good Foods Vs. Bad Foods

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Tropical Island

My Healthy Journey: TV Bingeing

Instead of telling you all about how healthy I’m being (although I am cooking and eating better!), I have a confession.

I binge on TV shows. I love TV bingeing.

Actually, I binge on all types of media. I binge on social media (a hazard of the job really), movies, and especially television shows. And when winter hits, especially after getting all new bedding for Christmas like I did this year, all I want to do is curl up in my comfy bed with my dog and Netflix. And this year has been no exception.

I may have (definitely did) watched all 6 seasons of Lost in the last month, and 3 of those were in the last week. (Because I don’t have self-control!) Did I choose a show that encourages this with a million mysteries? Probably. Is it actually crazy that I did this? Yes!

I know I’m not the only one who does this, but I have to say that I feel awful now. Is this partly because I wasn’t completely satisfied with the ending? Probably (sorry Lost lovers!). Is it because I stayed up ‘til 3 a.m. to finish it before work? Totally.

But it’s also because it has been emotionally draining! Investing that much thought for days and hours in a row, especially in characters experiencing some serious drama, has been exhausting. I’ve felt the stress of their lives on top of my shoulders for the last three weeks. I may or may not have spent an unhealthy amount of time crying about people that aren’t real for the last day. That’s completely crazy!

Not to mention there’s a physical toll. Lack of sleep, check. Shoulders aching from stress, check. Back nearly out from sitting still for 8-hour blocks at a time, check. Puffy eyes and stuffed nose, check. An unhealthy level of Doritos in my body, check.

And guess what, this is bad for you! Science says so!

Scientists have compared sitting still for long periods to smoking. In this Huffington Post article, Dr. James Levine is quoted as saying, “Sitting is more dangerous than smoking, kills more people than HIV and is more treacherous than parachuting. We are sitting ourselves to death. “

I sit all day at work, I’m hunched over my phone using my own and my job’s social media 24/7, and then I binge on TV in my bed all winter long. And all this sitting increases my risk of obesity, type 2 diabetes, muscular problems, and depression, and it can even lower my energy.  (See infographic below.)

And all this hunching over and staring at screens increases the risk for bad posture, back problems, carpal-tunnel, neck strain, and eye problems. The Atlantic recently highlighted a study about the scary amount of time we let our kids stare at screens, much more than the recommended 2 hour a day max, increasing their risk of all of those problems. And at this rate, I personally am spending at least 15 hours of my day with a screen, and that’s actually being generous for my time offline.

This brings me back to my goals for 2015, to spend less time on my devices and to do other activities more often, like reading for fun and yoga. There are also ways to get around your schedule, like standing desks and their many benefits. Time to refocus and get up!

Can I promise I will never TV binge again? Absolutely not. Can I give you a big list of reasons we should all do this less? Absolutely!

Take a Stand Infographic
Image via Pain Management and Injury Relief

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Air Quality Index

Keeping Track of Air Quality

Just like a stoplight tells you when to go, the Air Quality Index (AQI) tells you when it’s safe to go outside and how clean the air is to breathe.

Across America, the AQI tracks smog, pollution from cars, soil dust, pollen, and ash. Every day, the Environment Protection Agency (EPA) gives the air quality a color.

Green is the best, and as it goes from green to yellow to orange, the air gets less clean.

Poor air quality is a threat to everyone’s health, but children, the elderly, and those with breathing problems need to be even more careful. The worse the air, the more likely it will trigger an asthma flare-up.

Green is when it’s perfect to play outside, but as it changes colors, slow down or maybe even stay in.

AQI Color

AQI Status

Advice

Green

Good

Enjoy the outdoors.

Yellow

Moderate

Enjoy the outdoors, but maybe limit how long you’re outside.

Orange

Unhealthy for elderly, kids, and those with breathing problems

Take it easy, and if you’re at risk, think about staying inside.

Red

Unhealthy

Stay inside.

Purple

Very unhealthy

Stay inside.

Maroon

Hazardous

Definitely stay inside.

 

Before you head out, you can check the day’s color at AirNow, and protect yourself from the start.

Hoarding Warning Signs

Warning Signs of Hoarding

What Is Hoarding?

Lately, it seems like almost every cable TV channel has a show about hoarding and people who live in less-than-great conditions because they can’t let go of anything, even trash.

While these people represent extreme cases, even mild hoarding can be a problem. As we get older, we tend to hang onto things. This often creates dangerous living areas, especially for seniors who have issues with balance and falling.

Clutter can also lead to other problems. It makes it harder to keep track of things you need like bills, meds, keys, and contact info for your friends and loved ones.

People with hoarding disorders usually save things because they believe these things will be needed in the future, they have emotional significance, and because having these things makes them feel safer and more secure. Because of this, it’s very different than collecting, when people careful find and display special items, like stamps or model cars.

Hoarding animals is one of the most dangerous forms of hoarding. Pets in these situations often aren’t cared for properly, which is dangerous for them and for you because of the unsanitary conditions this can lead to.

Signs of Hoarding

    • Cluttered living spaces, especially when it stops you from being able to use rooms for their intended purposes, like not being able to cook in the kitchen.
    • Extreme attachment to unimportant objects.
    • Letting trash build up to an unhealthy level.
    • Keeping stacks of newspapers and junk mail, or collecting lots of useless items.
    • Moving items from one pile to another without ever throwing anything away.
    • Trouble making decisions about and organizing your stuff.
    • Having a hard time letting others touch or borrow your things.
    • Embarrassment over your home.
    • Limited social interactions.

Getting Help

But hoarding is a treatable mental illness. Therapy where you talk with a doctor and certain drugs, usually ones used for depression, can help. Sticking to a treatment plan made with your doctor and support groups can also help you avoid hoarding.

You can also get help cleaning out your home with organizers, local assistance, or your friends and family. And you may find you have a lot of great things that you could donate to make someone else’s life better.

If hoarding affects you or someone you love, talk to your doctor as soon as possible. They can help you find a therapist who can work with you to make a treatment plan and recommend resources to help you clean up the clutter.