Tag Archives: type 2 diabetes

Defeat Diabetes Month

Defeat Diabetes Month

It’s Defeat Diabetes Month. 9.4% of Americans have diabetes, and 1 in 4 of them don’t even know they have it.

Diabetes affects 1 in 4 people over 65 years old. Managing your diabetes is even more important as you age.

Managing Diabetes As You Age

 

The most common types of diabetes are type 1, type 2, and gestational diabetes.

Diabetes 101

 

If you have diabetes, monitoring your blood sugar, exercise, and diet change can all help you manage your disease long-term.

Treating Diabetes

 

These resources are packed with lifestyle tips that can help you make smart day-to-day choices when you have diabetes.

Around the Web: Your Healthy Lifestyle for Diabetes

 

Diabetes can lead to more health problems, like heart disease, stroke, nerve damage, and more.

Preventing More Serious Diabetes Complications

 

Curious about the history of diabetes? Learn more about how humans have made sense of it through the years.

The History of Diabetes

Protect Your Health for Dairy Month

Dairy Month

June is Dairy Month. Do you know why you should be getting dairy in your diet?

Calcium in dairy helps build your bones and teeth and prevent breaks.

The Benefits of Dairy

 

Dairy is especially important for kids. It helps build bone mass while they’re young.

Dairy and Your Kids

 

A diet with dairy in it helps reduce your risk of osteoporosis later in life.

Dairy In Your Diet

 

Dairy, especially yogurt and milk, is rich in potassium, which helps with your blood pressure.

A diet with dairy in it helps reduce your risk of cardiovascular disease and high cholesterol.

Yogurt and Milk's Benefits

 

The vitamin D in dairy helps your body maintain calcium and protect your bones.

Building Stronger Bones

 

A diet with dairy in it also helps lower your risk of type 2 diabetes.

Preventing Disease with Dairy

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Diabetes Resources and Treatment

National Diabetes Month

November is National Diabetes Month, and now’s the time to raise awareness and protect yourself.

86 million Americans are at risk of developing diabetes. Learn how you can protect yourself starting at home.

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This month is also Diabetic Eye Disease Month. ‪‎Diabetes‬ is the #1 cause of new blindness in adults. Learn more.

Eye Exams and Diabetes

 

Understanding your diabetes can be kind of like football, from U.S. News and World Report.

Visit our diabetes section to learn more about taking care of you or your family’s disease.

Diabetes is more common and more serious than many Americans realize. Protect yourself now.

Diabetes by the Numbers

 

You can help stop type 2 diabetes in its tracks with smart shopping and eating. Find resources from the American Diabetes Association to get started.

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Exercise is an important part of taking care of and preventing diabetes. Programs like this can help, from NPR.

Interested in learning more about diabetes from our different partners’ health experts? Check out our events page for presentations and videos.

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Rifling Through the History of Diabetes

The History of Diabetes

Learning About Your Family's Diabetes

Around the Web: You and Your Family’s Diabetes

According to the American Diabetes Association (ADA), in 2012, 29.1 million people had diabetes, and 8.1 million of them didn’t even know they had it. Managing you and your family’s diabetes can be a challenge.

Sometimes, you don’t realize the reach the disease can have on your health and your lives.

Diabetes Guides

These visual guides can help you understand the difference between type 1 diabetes and type 2 diabetes.

Your diabetes can affect your feet,  eyes, and mouth. These guides tell you how diabetes affects them, and ways to prevent problems.

Controlling your blood sugar through an insulin-based treatment plan can be tricky, but these tips can help.

Your blood sugar can also swing for reasons other than what you eat, so awareness is key.

When you’re first diagnosed, insulin injections can be a scary part of dealing with your diabetes. This guide can help walk you through the process.

You can also check out the YouTube video playlist Diabetes Basics from the ADA to learn more about how diabetes works and ways to protect yourself.

Your Family’s Diabetes

Of the 9.3% of the U.S. population who has diabetes, about 208,000 people are under age 20. And when you’re still growing up, the age difference can change the affects, both physically and emotionally.

The ADA’s page For Parents and Kids is a great place to start as you explore your child’s diabetes. Be Healthy Today; Be Healthy for Life is also an in-depth resource for kids and their families about living with type 2 diabetes.

The National Diabetes Education Program also has these PDFs of helpful info and tips written specifically for teens and their needs:

The ADA also has a page, Everyday Life, that helps you find resources to help your kids live with diabetes through all the stages and events of life. Topics include leaving them with babysitters, telling others, playing sports, and even parties, dating, and driving.

Their YouTube channel also has a playlist of videos to help you make sure your kids are Safe at School.

For additional resources and ways we can help, visit us online and join our Diabetes Disease Management program.

Tropical Island

My Healthy Journey: TV Bingeing

Instead of telling you all about how healthy I’m being (although I am cooking and eating better!), I have a confession.

I binge on TV shows. I love TV bingeing.

Actually, I binge on all types of media. I binge on social media (a hazard of the job really), movies, and especially television shows. And when winter hits, especially after getting all new bedding for Christmas like I did this year, all I want to do is curl up in my comfy bed with my dog and Netflix. And this year has been no exception.

I may have (definitely did) watched all 6 seasons of Lost in the last month, and 3 of those were in the last week. (Because I don’t have self-control!) Did I choose a show that encourages this with a million mysteries? Probably. Is it actually crazy that I did this? Yes!

I know I’m not the only one who does this, but I have to say that I feel awful now. Is this partly because I wasn’t completely satisfied with the ending? Probably (sorry Lost lovers!). Is it because I stayed up ‘til 3 a.m. to finish it before work? Totally.

But it’s also because it has been emotionally draining! Investing that much thought for days and hours in a row, especially in characters experiencing some serious drama, has been exhausting. I’ve felt the stress of their lives on top of my shoulders for the last three weeks. I may or may not have spent an unhealthy amount of time crying about people that aren’t real for the last day. That’s completely crazy!

Not to mention there’s a physical toll. Lack of sleep, check. Shoulders aching from stress, check. Back nearly out from sitting still for 8-hour blocks at a time, check. Puffy eyes and stuffed nose, check. An unhealthy level of Doritos in my body, check.

And guess what, this is bad for you! Science says so!

Scientists have compared sitting still for long periods to smoking. In this Huffington Post article, Dr. James Levine is quoted as saying, “Sitting is more dangerous than smoking, kills more people than HIV and is more treacherous than parachuting. We are sitting ourselves to death. “

I sit all day at work, I’m hunched over my phone using my own and my job’s social media 24/7, and then I binge on TV in my bed all winter long. And all this sitting increases my risk of obesity, type 2 diabetes, muscular problems, and depression, and it can even lower my energy.  (See infographic below.)

And all this hunching over and staring at screens increases the risk for bad posture, back problems, carpal-tunnel, neck strain, and eye problems. The Atlantic recently highlighted a study about the scary amount of time we let our kids stare at screens, much more than the recommended 2 hour a day max, increasing their risk of all of those problems. And at this rate, I personally am spending at least 15 hours of my day with a screen, and that’s actually being generous for my time offline.

This brings me back to my goals for 2015, to spend less time on my devices and to do other activities more often, like reading for fun and yoga. There are also ways to get around your schedule, like standing desks and their many benefits. Time to refocus and get up!

Can I promise I will never TV binge again? Absolutely not. Can I give you a big list of reasons we should all do this less? Absolutely!

Take a Stand Infographic
Image via Pain Management and Injury Relief

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Treating Diabetes with Glucose Checks

Treating Diabetes

There isn’t a cure for diabetes, but it is very treatable. Treating diabetes depends on which type of diabetes you have.

Type 1 Diabetes

Because those with type 1 diabetes can’t produce enough of their own insulin, they must treat their diabetes with insulin injections.

Type 2 Diabetes

For many, treatment for type 2 diabetes focuses on diet and exercise. If blood sugar levels stay high, oral medications can help your body better produce insulin.

In some cases, insulin injections are used.

For those who who are at risk of TOFI type 2 diabetes, it’s important to:

  • Exercise, which is the only way to shed fat on the abdominal organs.
  • Lower stress, which can temporarily raise your blood sugar.
  • Diet smart by avoiding “diet foods” that are actually loaded with sugar, like low-fat salad dressings and vitamin drinks.

Gestational Diabetes

Treatment for gestational diabetes needs to happen quickly to protect you and your baby.

Treatment tries to keep your blood sugar levels at the same levels as healthy pregnant women’s through a combination of these:

  • Specialized meal plans
  • Regular, scheduled physical activity
  • Daily blood sugar testing
  • Insulin injections

It’s important to work with your doctor to make a treatment plan in all cases, but especially with gestational diabetes where personal changes are important for protecting your baby.

Testing

The A1c test measures your average blood sugar level over 2-3 months. Your doctor will generally order it every 3-6 months depending on which type of diabetes you have to keep an eye on how your treatment is working.

For most adults, the American Diabetes Association’s suggests your A1c be under 7%, but your doctor will help you decide what’s best for you. Studies show that people with diabetes keep normal A1c levels live five years longer, on average.

Checking your blood sugar with your personal meter helps you manage your treatment on a day-to-day basis. It gives you info right away to help you make decisions about taking your insulin, when to exercise, and tell you if you’re on track.

Keeping normal blood sugar levels reduces the risk of high cholesterol, and controlling your cholesterol can lower heart complications by 50%.

These two tests work together to tell you how your diabetes management is going. This chart shows what an A1c level translates to in blood sugar levels:

A1c Average Blood Sugar (mg/dl)

6% 126

7% 154

8% 183

9% 212

10%    240

11%    269

12%    298

Insulin Injections

The biggest challenge to people who are treating diabetes with insulin injections is balancing exactly how much insulin you need to take, which can vary based on:

  • Food
  • Exercise
  • Stress
  • Current emotions
  • General health

Not balancing these factors and your insulin can result in hypoglycemia and hyperglycemia.

Hypoglycemia is when you eat too little food, take too much insulin or diabetes meds, or get extra exercise, which causes your blood sugar levels to be too low.

Hyperglycemia is when you eat too much food, don’t take enough insulin, or are stressed or sick, and then your blood sugar levels are too high.

The best way to know if your blood sugar is high or low is to test your levels. But it’s also good to know the warning signs:

Hypoglycemia

  • Shaky
  • Dizzy
  • Nervous
  • Sweaty
  • Hungry
  • Clumsy
  • Confused
  • Trouble paying attention
  • Tingling mouth
  • Headache
  • Pale face
  • Seizure
  • Passing out

Hyperglycemia

  • Going to the bathroom a lot
  • Thirsty
  • Tired
  • Weak
  • Blurry vision
  • Hungry, even when you’ve eaten.

When your blood sugar level is too low, you can:

  • Eat or drink something with 15 grams of carbs:
    • Try three glucose tablets, 4 ounces of apple or orange juice, 4 ounces regular soda, 1 tablespoon cake frosting or three Jolly Ranchers.
    • Wait 15 minutes, and then check your blood glucose level again.
    • If your blood glucose is still too low, eat another 15 grams of carbs. Wait another 15 minutes, and then check your blood glucose again. You may want to keep eating until you feel better, but it’s very important to wait the full 15 minutes.

If you or your care team feel your signs are serious, inject glucagon which is the opposite of insulin—it raises your blood glucose level.

If your blood sugar is high, it’s important to remember that one high blood sugar reading isn’t a big deal, it happens to everyone from time to time. But if you keep running high day after day, talk to your doctor.

No matter what, it’s important to talk to your doctor and care team about the best way to manage your diabetes and how to handle these situations.