Tag Archives: treatment

Atrial Fibrillation Month

Atrial Fibrillation Month

It’s Atrial Fibrillation Month, and atrial fibrillation, also known as AFib or AF, is a type of irregular heartbeat that can raise your risk of other health problems. Learn more.

Making Sense of Irregular Heartbeat

 

For most people, their heart beats between 60 and 100 times a minute. Those with AFib can have heart rates as high as 175 beats a minute.

AFib can feel like drums or thunder pounding in your chest or even flip-flopping in your chest. Talk to your doctor if you’ve experienced this kind of discomfort.

How AFib Feels

 

If you’re experiencing AFib and other issues, like shortness of breath with light physical activity, lightheadedness, dizziness, or fatigue, your heart might not be getting enough blood and oxygen out to your body.

AFib and Other Symptoms

 

AFib raises your risk of stroke by 5 times. It can allow clots to form, which can cause strokes that can cause serious damage to your tissue and brain.

AFib and Your Risk of Stroke

 

Some people may just have to cut caffeine in their diet to improve their AFib. Others may need special medication and treatment to address the underlying cause.

Cutting Caffeine for AFib

 

If you suffer from heartbeat irregularities, changes in your lifestyle, like being physically active, quitting smoking, or managing stress and your blood pressure can also help.

Improving AFib

National Spinal Muscular Atrophy Awareness Month

National Spinal Muscular Atrophy Awareness Month

It’s National Spinal Muscular Atrophy Awareness Month. Spinal Muscular Atrophy (SMA) is a rare disease that affects the motor nerve cells in the spinal cord, slowly robbing them of the ability to walk, eat, and breathe.

SMA and Nerve Damage

 

SMA is caused by a mutation in a gene that produces a protein critical to our nerves. Nerve cells can’t function without it.

SMA Gene Mutation

 

SMA is also the number one genetic cause of death in infants. About 1 in every 50 Americans could pass it on to their children.

Genetic SMA Carriers

 

There are 4 types of SMA based on the age when symptoms begin and the highest physical milestone the victim reaches. Type 1 in infants is often fatal, while type 4 in adults is very rare and only leads to mild motor impairment.

Types of SMA

 

SMA is usually diagnosed through genetic testing, newborn screenings, or through prenatal testing.

Prenatal SMA Testing

 

In 2016, the first FDA-approved treatment for SMA was approved. After an SMA diagnosis, it is key to work through the coming decisions with your family’s team of doctors.

Treating SMA

 

Those with SMA still develop mentally despite their physical barriers, so finding more forms of treatment and prevention are key to the future of the disease and those who suffer from it.

 

Hemochromatosis Screening Awareness Month

Hemochromatosis Screening Awareness Month

It’s Hemochromatosis Screening Awareness Month, and hemochromatosis is an inherited disorder where your body accumulates too much iron.

Patients usually don’t show serious signs until they’re over 40 years old, so it’s important to get screened in routine blood tests.

Hemochromatosis is especially common in those from European ancestry, affecting approximately 1 in 400 of them. Talk to your doctor about when you should be screened.

Blood Test Screenings

 

If you suffer from hemochromatosis, your body absorbs too much iron from your diet, as much as 4x too much, and since your body only has a few ways to get rid of iron, it accumulates over time in your liver, bones, joints, pancreas, and skin.

Getting Screened for Hemochromatosis

 

The extra iron in your system can cause organ damage, and iron deposits can darken your skin. It can also increase your risk of diabetes, heart attack, arthritis, and some cancers.

Risks of Hemochromatosis

 

The wrong level of iron in the brain has been tied to neurodegenerative diseases like Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s, epilepsy, and multiple sclerosis.

Brain Disease and Hemochromatosis

 

Symptoms of hemochromatosis include chronic fatigue, joint pain, especially in your knuckles, memory fog, an irregular heartbeat, and abdominal pain.

Hemochromatosis Symptoms

 

Getting iron levels down with therapeutic blood removal, or phlebotomy, is the most common treatment. Regular blood donations and a hemochromatosis-friendly diet can help you lower iron levels.

Hemochromatosis Treatment

PTSD Awareness Month

PTSD Awareness Month

It’s PTSD Awareness Month, and PTSD, or post-traumatic stress disorder, is an anxiety problem certain people suffer from caused by traumatic events like combat or a serious accident.

Understanding PTSD

 

Those suffering from PTSD may relive the event with overwhelming memories, flashbacks, or nightmares that disrupt their day-to-day lives.

PTSD Symptoms

 

Veterans are some of the U.S. citizens most likely to suffer from PTSD.

Veterans and PTSD

 

Homeless vets today are even more likely to be haunted by PTSD than veterans of previous eras were.

The Homeless Vets and PTSD Connection

 

Injured soldiers’ sleep issues can be key to improving their rehabilitation and issues with PTSD.

Sleep Issues and PTSD

 

Consider these issues and guidelines if you’re wondering about seeing a therapist for your PTSD.

Learn more about PTSD, its symptoms, treatment, and how to get more help.

PTSD Support and Help

Cataract Awareness Month

Cataract Awareness Month

June is Cataract Awareness Month, and you can learn more about them with us. Cataracts are the leading cause of vision loss in the U.S.

Cataracts, which are clouding of the lens of the eye that prevents light passing through, affect 24 million Americans over the age of 40.

Catching Cataracts

 

Cataracts are often simple to treat with cataract surgery where a surgeon removes the lens and replaces it with an artificial lens.

Cataract Surgery

 

3 million Americans undergo cataract surgery each year, making it one of the most common surgeries in the U.S. The whole outpatient procedure only lasts about 20 minutes and has a 95% success rate.

Cataract Treatment

 

A healthy lifestyle can help slow the progression of cataracts. Avoid smoking and exposure to UV rays and eat healthy foods to help prevent them.

Preventing Cataracts with Lifestyle

 

While cataracts normally affect seniors, heredity, disease, eye injuries, and even smoking can cause them in younger people.

Cataracts in Young People

 

Wearing proper eye protection to avoid eye injuries and sunglasses or glasses with UV protection in the sun can help you avoid cataracts.

Protecting Your Eyes from Cataracts

Mental Health Month

Mental Health Month

May is Mental Health Month, and we’re talking about some important mental health issues facing Americans all week.

Being exposed to violence or trauma as a kid can have long-term effects, from derailing development to increased mental and physical issues. Long or repeated stress can be toxic for kids, especially if they’re lacking adult support in their lives.

Childhood Trauma

 

Adverse childhood experiences can include emotional, physical, or sexual abuse, community violence, household addiction, parents divorcing, poverty, and bullying. Know the signs to help the children in your life.

Signs of Childhood Problems

 

Taking care of your mental health in college is especially important. 1 in 5 young adults experience a mental health condition, and 75% of those begin by 24 with many emerging in the college years.

Mental health issues affect students’ success at college. College can be difficult and isolating, and 45% have felt that things were hopeless at some point. Over 45% of those who stop attending could benefit from mental health support.

Support in College During Isolation

 

Only 1 in 3 of the people who need mental health help actually seek it out, even though treatments for the most common conditions are effective 80% of the time. It’s also the leading cause of disability in the U.S.

Mental Health and Work

 

In the wake of the opioid crisis, it’s important to understand how it affects mental health. Over time, addiction changes brain function, inhibiting a person’s ability to control substance use.

Brain Function and Opioids

 

Long-term use of opioids can cause a chronic brain disorder, which causes problems with the brain reward system, motivation, memory, and related circuitry. Encourage loved ones to see a doctor to explore treatment center options.

Recovering from Addiction

National Arthritis Awareness Month

National Arthritis Awareness Month

May is National Arthritis Awareness Month, and arthritis is America’s number one cause of disability. There are also nearly 1 million hospitalizations each year because of arthritis.

Coping with Arthritis

 

Nearly 53 million adults and almost 300,000 babies, kids, and teens have arthritis or a rheumatic condition. Learn more about arthritis.

People with osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis miss 172 million days of work per year. Learn about the different kinds of arthritis and be prepared.

Fighting Back Against Arthritis

 

Many people with arthritis also have other serious conditions. 57% of adults with heart disease, 52% of those with diabetes, and 44% of those with high blood pressure, have arthritis. Learn more about arthritis research.

Struggling with Arthritis and Health Conditions

 

1/3 of adults with arthritis who would normally be working have limitations in their ability to work, and overall, they’re less likely to be employed than those without arthritis. If you have arthritis, learn more about managing your pain.

Arthritis & Work-Life Limitations

 

Arthritis and its related conditions account for over $156 billion in yearly lost wages and medical expenses. If you have arthritis though, you have treatment options.

The Cost of Arthritis

 

If you need support emotionally or the tools and resources to make healthy changes like exercise and diet that can improve your arthritis, the Arthritis Foundation can help.

The Arthritis Support You Need