Tag Archives: supportive

Fight Caregiver Fatigue

Long View: Nobody Is an Island – Recognizing and Addressing Caregiver Fatigue

The holidays are supposed to be a time for family gatherings, parties, traveling, and opportunities to laugh and relax with the ones you love. For some, though, the holidays have different associations, like stress, anxiety, and isolation.

Caregivers can often feel stressed during the holiday season. While others are enjoying this time of year, caregivers may feel isolated as they focus on the care of a loved one. Caregivers selflessly provide around-the-clock, unpaid care to seniors and people with disabilities. They are tasked with accompanying their loved one to medical appointments, managing their medications, and handling their financial affairs, all while balancing their own obligations.

Caregivers also often overlook their own mental, emotional, and physical health. As a result, they can feel a sense of isolation, like they’re alone on an island. This feeling is called caregiver fatigue.

Mitchell Forrest, a social worker at Central Illinois Agency on Aging in Peoria, provided insight into caregiver fatigue. “Caregivers who feel a sense of hopelessness, are socially withdrawn, not sleeping, and experiencing illness and weight loss, may be suffering from caregiver fatigue and should seek out supports to help them manage their stress,” he said.

If left untreated, caregiver fatigue can take such a physical and mental toll that they can no longer care for their loved one.

But caregivers can find a network of encouragement through support groups. National organizations, like the Alzheimer’s Association, offer local support groups for caregivers of people with different diagnoses.

Respite services can be another vital resource. For a fee, nursing homes and adult day services offer a safe, supportive environment where the loved one will be in trusted hands for a few hours or longer, so the caregiver can rest. In-home personal aides can also provide additional assistance to the caregiver.

While no resource is a remedy for the anxiety of caring for a sick loved one, caregivers should know that they are not alone. Talking to someone is invaluable, and there are many counselors who specialize in the needs of caregivers.

Area Agencies on Aging offer resources and referrals to support seniors, people with disabilities, and their caregivers. If you feel alone on the island, send a signal and help will find you.

 

Chris Maxeiner is a community liaison with Health Alliance. His background is in the fields of healthcare and government programs. His favorite superhero is Batman, and he is an avid Chicago sports fan (Bears, Bulls, Blackhawks, and White Sox).

Sports Safety and Football

Sports Safety Tips

This week on social media, we gave you some important tips for sports safety and keeping your kids healthy and safe this year. Accidents do happen, but there are some ways to protect them!

First up, makes sure they get a sports physical, or PPE, that can rule out conditions that could put your young athlete at risk.

Make sure they and their coaches always have their emergency contact info and anything they need to treat a condition, like asthma inhalers.

Make sure that kids have time to warm up and stretch major muscle groups for at least 10 minutes before practices and games.

Always send your kids with a water bottle. It’s good to hydrate 30 minutes before and every 15-20 minutes during activity.

Learn the symptoms and signs of a concussion. Sideline the player and get help from a medical professional right away.

Rest should be a priority. They should have a day or two off from their activities each week. If they’re hurt, they shouldn’t play to give them plenty of time to heal.

Be supportive parents. Go to a sports safety clinic in your area to learn more and make sure that you support them if or when it hurts too much for them to play. And of course, be their biggest cheerleader!