Tag Archives: stroke

Defeat Diabetes Month

Defeat Diabetes Month

It’s Defeat Diabetes Month. 9.4% of Americans have diabetes, and 1 in 4 of them don’t even know they have it.

Diabetes affects 1 in 4 people over 65 years old. Managing your diabetes is even more important as you age.

Managing Diabetes As You Age

 

The most common types of diabetes are type 1, type 2, and gestational diabetes.

Diabetes 101

 

If you have diabetes, monitoring your blood sugar, exercise, and diet change can all help you manage your disease long-term.

Treating Diabetes

 

These resources are packed with lifestyle tips that can help you make smart day-to-day choices when you have diabetes.

Around the Web: Your Healthy Lifestyle for Diabetes

 

Diabetes can lead to more health problems, like heart disease, stroke, nerve damage, and more.

Preventing More Serious Diabetes Complications

 

Curious about the history of diabetes? Learn more about how humans have made sense of it through the years.

The History of Diabetes

Brain Injury Awareness Month

Brain Injury Awareness Month

It’s Brain Injury Awareness Month, and every 9 seconds, someone sustains a brain injury. Learn more about brain injuries.

Brain Injuries

 

Acquired brain injuries (ABIs) are ones that aren’t hereditary or from a degenerative disease. These can be caused by infection, electric shocks, nearly drowning, stroke, seizures, tumors, substance abuse, and overdose. 

Traumatic brain injuries (TBIs) are from a trauma to the brain, and every day, 137 people die of TBI-related injuries. At least 5.3 million Americans live with a TBI-related disability.

Traumatic Brain Injuries

 

Opioid addictions and overdoses can cause permanent brain injuries and disabilities.

Opioids and Brain Injuries

 

Strokes are brain injuries that can permanently alter your life. Learn more about preventing strokes.

Preventing Strokes

 

Concussions are brain injuries, and without treatment, they can cause serious problems. But a better way to detect them might be on the way.

Concussions' Effects on the Brain

 

More than 13,000 service members and veterans are diagnosed with TBIs, and knowing the signs is key to getting help.

Military and Vet Brain Injuries

Go Red for Heart Health

Long View: You Can’t Beat a Healthy Heart or 6 More Weeks of Winter

Just when you think the holidays are over and the thrill of the new year has finally tapered down, here comes February — Groundhog Day, Super Bowl Sunday, Mardis Gras, Valentine’s Day, and Presidents Day. February is a multi-themed, food-filled month of celebration.

We anticipate the shadow reveal of Punxsutawney Phil, we break out the football-shaped cheese ball to root for our team, we plan our menu of anything and everything on Fat Tuesday, and if that isn’t enough, we love to eat chocolates on the day of love. Then when it’s all over (and after a slight weight gain), we hit the mall for some comfy stretch wear with Presidents Day sale bargains!

But wait, how about doing something this month to celebrate our health and focus on our heart? If we can take advice from a small woodchuck about the weather, we surely can take advice from the American Heart Association about our health!

February is American Heart Month, and part of that is National Wear Red Day. For those of you who know me, my wardrobe pretty much consists of drab colors and neutrals, but this year, I broke out my red floral scarf for a splash of color as a symbol of support!

The American Heart Association and the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute encourage all of us to take action against this killer disease. Studies show that 80% of cardiac and stroke events may be preventable with education and action.

Find time to talk to your family and get everyone on board with heart health. Encourage healthy eating habits by making healthier versions of your favorite food. Choose foods and recipes low in sodium and with no added sugar or trans fats. When you shop, buy colorful fruits and vegetables, which are all powerhouses when it comes to nutrition, and stay away from dairy and meat products that are high in fat.

Fiber is important in your diet, and you can find fiber not only in fruits and vegetables, but also in beans, nuts, and whole grain. Take the time to read the nutrition labels on items, and check out the sodium content. (A general rule is, if anything has more than 250 mg of sodium, you may want to search for something with less.)

Physical activity can also help you stay heart healthy. It’s not only what you put into your body, it’s also what you put out. Exercise helps to improve heart health, and it can even help reverse certain heart disease risk factors. Our heart becomes stronger from exercise, which helps it pump more blood through the body and work at maximum level without strain.

Aerobic activities at least 3 to 4 times a week are the best. Choose walking, swimming, or biking, and allow for a good 5 minutes of stretching beforehand to warm up your muscles and a cool down period after you’re through. And of course, always check with your doctor before starting any new physical routine.

So this February, maybe forego indulging in lavish holiday food choices (remember that New Year’s resolution?) and celebrate in a new way. Go out and buy something red to wear to celebrate heart health AND 6 more weeks of winter, or will it be an early spring? Better check with Punxsutawney Phil before you go!

Mervet Adams is a community liaison with Health Alliance. She loves her grandson, family, nature, and fashion.

Preventing High Blood Pressure

Stroke Awareness Month and High Blood Pressure Education Month

It’s National Stroke Awareness Month and National High Blood Pressure Education Month. Learn more about managing your blood pressure.

Blood Pressure and Cholesterol Resources

Stroke is 1 of the leading causes of death and disability in the U.S., but it doesn’t have to be. For Stroke Month, learn how you can treat and prevent stroke with tools from the CDC.

Preventing Strokes

 

On average, 1 American dies from a stroke every 4 minutes. But there is good news; up to 80% of strokes are preventable. Take action to lower your risk for stroke with these resources from Million Hearts.

Lower Stroke Risk

 

Can you spot the signs and symptoms of a stroke? Knowing how to spot a stroke and respond quickly could potentially save a life. Put your stroke knowledge to the test with this quiz.

Stroke Signs Symptoms

 

Time lost is brain lost. Every minute counts! If you or someone you know shows symptoms of a stroke, call 911 right away.

Act FAST to Spot a Stroke

 

From the first symptoms of stroke to recovery at home, here’s how the CDC Coverdell Program connects healthcare professionals across the system of care to save lives and improve care.

Stroke Awareness Month

 

High blood pressure can increase your risk for stroke. This Stroke Month, make blood pressure control your goal with tips from Million Hearts.

Lowering Your Blood Pressure

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Through with Chewing Tobacco

Quitting Chewing Tobacco

Chewing tobacco can be just as dangerous for your health as other forms of tobacco. It’s time to quit for Through with the Chew Week.

Chewing tobacco is tied to many mouth problems, including mouth, tongue, cheek, and gum cancer, and can also cause cancer in the esophagus and pancreas.

Smokeless Tobacco Dangers

 

Chew can cause leukoplakia, or gray-white patches in the mouth that can become cancer.

Chewing Tobacco and Cancer

 

Chewing tobacco also stains your teeth, causes bad breath, and destroys your gum tissue.

Protect Your Mouth from Tobacco

 

If you regularly use smokeless tobacco, you’re more likely to have gum disease, cavities, tooth decay, and expensive dental issues.

Protect Your Teeth from Tobacco

 

All forms of tobacco, including the smokeless kind, increase your risk of heart disease and high blood pressure.

Kick the Chew for Your Teeth

 

When you chew tobacco, you also raise your risk of heart attack, stroke, and serious pregnancy complications.

Smokeless tobacco can also lead to nicotine poisoning and death in kids who mistake it for candy.

Chewing Tobbaco and Kids

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Take a Break with Tea

National Hot Tea Month

January is National Hot Tea Month. Tea has many health benefits that make it the perfect beverage for chilly winter days.

The antioxidants in green tea can boost your endurance while exercising, and they increase your ability to burn fat as a fuel.

Antioxidants That Help You Move

 

A 2016 study found green tea drinkers lowered their chance of stroke by 35%.

Green Tea's Health Benefits

 

Studies show drinking tea could help reduce the risk of heart attack.

Drinking Hot Tea for Your Heart

 

Tea might help protect your bone health, reducing breaks from falls.

 

Antioxidants in green tea can help protect your skin and reduce inflammation.

Drinking Your Way to Health Benefits

 

Japanese researchers found that tea can decrease tooth loss and doesn’t erode enamel.

Protecting Your Teeth with Hot Tea

 

Herbal teas might help soothe your digestive system, like ginger teas that calm nausea.

Herbal Tea for Your Stomach

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National High Blood Pressure Education Month

National High Blood Pressure Education Month

It’s National High Blood Pressure Education Month. High blood pressure increases your stroke risk, and every 40 seconds, an American has a stroke. Learn more.

High Blood Pressure's Risk

 

The Dangers of Strokes for Women

Do you understand your blood pressure? Learn more now.

Understanding Blood Pressure

 

High Blood Pressure's Risk

Break down your risk of high blood pressure to understand it better.

Breaking Down Why Your Blood Pressure’s High

 

Your Age and Strokes

Learn to eat right and exercise to fight high blood pressure.

Learn to Eat Right and Exercise for Your Heart

 

 High Blood Pressure's Risk

Tobacco takes a toll on your blood pressure. Learn more and get help quitting.

Tobacco and Your Heart

 

Learn About High Blood Pressure

This handy guide helps break down the info around your blood pressure meds.

Your Meds and Your Heart

 

High Blood Pressure's Risk

We’ve got quick tips to help you cut back on salt for your blood pressure without losing flavor:

Cutting Back on Salt for Your Heart

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