Tag Archives: stressed

The Holiday Season

Long View: Did You Thrive or Survive this Holiday Season?

Here at Health Alliance, we’ve made it through another holiday season. Most years I’m stressed from Thanksgiving through New Year’s Day. Add in Medicare and Individual enrollment seasons, and it’s easy to wish the holidays away. Here are some ways I managed to thrive, not just survive, during the holidays.

I need to say no sometimes.

I didn’t attend every activity I was invited to, and I am a better person for it. Most years, I cause a lot of my own stress by trying to fit too many things on the calendar. Setting aside some time to relax and reflect became an important part of this round of celebrations. Try it. You might enjoy the things you agreed to do a little more.

I need to get over myself.

I don’t have to be involved in every decision. All the adults in my life are capable of selecting a turkey or picking up family from the airport. My involvement is not only unnecessary, but sometimes unwelcome. That realization took stress off me and my family!

I will not whine.

The grocery stores seemed to be crowded every time I needed to shop. Long lines, people rushing around, tempting candy displays—you know the scene. Every time I was close to whining, I remembered almost 20 percent of the population in Champaign County doesn’t know where their next meal is coming from. We can all stand in line without complaining. This gave me a much better attitude throughout the holidays.

I will not mention how cold it is outside.

I need to hunker down and stop focusing on the weather. We live in Illinois, not Hawaii. The weather is no surprise. I’m trying to focus on the warmth of the holidays, not the cold outside.

These little steps helped me have a more enjoyable holiday season. We’re also using them to get through our Health Alliance busy season with great results. Give them a try and you can thrive during the holidays, too.

 

Patrick Harness is a community liaison with a long history of experience in health insurance. If you ask him to pick a color, he always chooses orange, and he is known for his inability to parallel park.

Learn About Tobacco and High Blood Pressure

Tobacco and Your Heart

Tobacco and High Blood Pressure

When you think about the damage tobacco does, you worry about your lungs and mouth. But when you combine tobacco and high blood pressure, it can be hurting you in more ways than you know.

There’s a common belief that chewing tobacco isn’t as bad for you as smoking is, but it can also cause serious health problems. Smokeless tobacco increases your heart rate and blood pressure. Some evidence suggests these products may put you at an increased risk of heart attack or stroke.

Chewing tobacco will still get you hooked on nicotine, the same way cigarettes do. Once you’re addicted, it becomes difficult to stop. Just like with smoking, withdrawals cause intense cravings, make you hungrier, and make you more irritable and depressed.

But the stimulants in all forms of tobacco can have this effect on your blood pressure. The best thing you can do for your heart is quit tobacco completely.

Help Quitting

The first step to quitting is really wanting to quit. These tips can help you get started:

  • Make a list of your reasons for quitting.
  • Set a quit date.
  • List what might stop you from staying tobacco-free. Do you smoke when you’re stressed, hungry, or when you go out with friends?
  • Plan ways to fight it in those moments.
  • Ask family, friends, and your doctor for help.

Our members can also use our Quit For Life program for help . This program helps you break tobacco’s mental and physical hold. You’ll get:

  • One-on-one coaching from a quit coach
  • A quit plan made just for you
  • Helpful tools, like Text2Quit
  • Web Coach®, an online learning and support community

It’s never too late to quit. For more information, visit QuitNow.net or call 1-866-QUIT-4-LIFE (1-866-784-8454).