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Get Organized

Covered Bridge: Getting Organized for the New Year

Every year I start out with a new goal. Of course, a healthier lifestyle is always at the top of my list, but I also always make other goals. (Maybe it’s so if I fail at my first goal, I have backups? We’ll discuss that on next year’s January e-column if I succeed!)

Some are big and some are small, but one I know consistently comes back each year is, “how do I get organized?” (I do realize that if this is a consistent goal each year, shouldn’t it be my first goal? Baby steps here…)

I notice each year when I set out to accomplish this goal, I feel the need to take this on alone, and then suddenly, I’m overwhelmed and want to quit immediately. That should be my first red flag.  

Asking for help should be the first step in this goal. Whether it’s from a spouse, children, family members, friends, or co-workers, asking for help will always make it easier to get the task done, no matter what you are trying to organize.

Don’t try to do it all at once! We get so wrapped up in trying to accomplish our new goal that we try to do too much at once, and then we fail, because it’s just too much. Start small, work in timed intervals, and most importantly, remember it doesn’t have to be done in one day.

Enjoy the process! Whether you are reminiscing over photos or paperwork or cleaning out the garage, take the time to remember the things you’re going through and share your stories with someone. You never know, someone may want the item as a keepsake to tell the story later.

At Reid Health Alliance, we hold Downsizing and Decluttering educational presentations, and if you know a group that may want some more information in the coming months, please feel free to reach out to me. Even if I never get organized this year, I can help you get organized!

Happy New Year and new goals!

Morgan Gunder is a community and broker liaison for Reid Health Alliance. Born in the South and raised in the Midwest, she is a wife and mother with a passion for traveling, learning, and technology.

National Influenza Vaccination Week

National Influenza Vaccination Week

This week was National Influenza Vaccination Week. The flu shot is the best tool to protect you and your family.

Struggling Through the Flu

 

The flu causes millions of illnesses, hundreds of thousands of hospitalizations, and thousands of deaths every season. Get your shot today!

Avoid Getting Sick with the Shot

 

More than 132.7 million people have already gotten their flu shots. If your kids are over 6 months, protect them now!

Protect Your Kids From the Flu

 

Flu shots are the best way to avoid seasonal doctors’ visits, missed work and school, and to prevent hospitalizations.

Avoid Flu Season Woes

 

The flu can be a serious danger to your health, especially to those under 6 months old, pregnant women, and the elderly. Protect yourself now!

Our blogger overcame her fear of the flu shot. Let her story remind you why you need yours.

As a Health Alliance member, your flu shot is covered, so there’s no reason not to get yours today!

You're Covered, So Feel Better!

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Discovering Effective Alzheimer's Disease Treatments

National Alzheimer’s Disease Awareness Month

This month is National Alzheimer’s Disease Awareness Month. Take the Purple Pledge to support people facing it today.

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The first trial that’s trying to prevent Alzheimer’s before symptoms start is happening now from BBC News.

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It’s important to know the signs of Alzheimer’s to protect yourself and your loved ones.

Intelligence Therapy

 

This touching story from the New York Times Magazine will remind you why we must end Alzheimer’s.

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Find facts and figures and resources, or find a walk to support a cure.

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Studies like this one are working hard to figure what exactly causes Alzheimer’s, from The Economist.

MRI Image Brain On Black Background

Doctors and scientists are getting close to effective treatments in the journey to end Alzheimer’s, from Forbes.

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Brain Awareness and Communication

Brain Awareness Week

It was Brain Awareness Week this week which is sponsored by the Society for Neuroscience to teach students all about the amazing power of the brain. We will be giving you interesting info about your brain each day this week.

First up is a TED talk all about how one team is mapping how your brain works.

Mapping Your Brain

 

Ever wondered why that song is stuck in your head? It’s called an earworm! Learn more about this interesting brain phenomenon.

Dancing Earworms

 

When you hit your thumb, that’s where you think the pain is. But actually, it’s in your brain. Listen to this NPR story about how pain is really in your head.

Hammer and Thumb

 

Smell has a huge impact on your life. It’s even the number one sense that triggers memories. But how does it really work? It’s all about your brain.

Homemade Smell

 

The power of expectations makes the placebo effect possible. Learn more about this power of your brain.

The Power of Placebo

 

How does your brain use chemicals to communicate? Scientists have unlocked the process of neurotransmitters.

What actually happens to you on a sugar rush? This podcast tells you all about your brain on sugar.

Your Brain on Sugar

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Balancing Daily Tasks with Dementia

Vantage Point: Summer Activity Opens Eyes, Prompts Compassion

I love all the fun activities that come with summer—festivals, parades, vacations, theme parks, and backyard barbecues. One of my recent summer activities, however, was unlike any I’ve ever done before, and the profound experience will resonate with me for the rest of my life.

I had the opportunity to watch a video of the Virtual Dementia Tour®, compliments of Assured Home Health and Hospice in Moses Lake. The tour gives family members and professional caregivers the chance to experience (as closely as possible) the physical, mental, and emotional challenges people with dementia face every day.

Before the tour, the group takes a short pretest. One of the questions is, “Do you think people with dementia are justified in their actions?” The answer choices are “yes,” “no” and “somewhat.” Most people answer “somewhat.”

After the pretest, the activity alters the participants’ mental and physical abilities when they put on these items.

  • Goggles that restrict their vision, as if they have macular degeneration
  • Headphones with garbled or random background noises, like people with mental disorders experience
  • Gloves with the fingers taped together and with popcorn kernels in the fingertips, and shoes with popcorn kernels in the toes, to represent neuropathy and arthritis

The group then goes to another room. Organizers give participants five everyday tasks, like sorting laundry and setting the table, to complete without help in a certain time frame.

Watching the people go through the experience made me think of being in a carnival maze, where you have a warped sense of bearings, balance, and judgment.

Most participants find the experience eye-opening. Even if they thought they knew what to expect, many didn’t anticipate bursting into tears of frustration or falling on the ground in confusion. Many change their pretest answer about behavior being justified from “somewhat” to “yes” in the post-test.

If you have a loved one with dementia or are a caregiver, I suggest you take the Virtual Dementia Tour. If you live in Grant County and want to sign up for a tour through Assured Home Health and Hospice, please call Julie Johnson at 509-766-2580 or Terri Riley-Brown at 509-765-1856.

ABC’s Nightline featured a powerful story about the Virtual Dementia Tour.  If you don’t take the tour, you can still see what the experience is like by watching this clip.

I hope you make fun memories with family and friends this summer. I also hope you take time to either watch the Nightline clip or sign up for the Virtual Dementia Tour so we can all increase our understanding and compassion for people with dementia.