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Sugar Awareness Week Recipes

Sugar Awareness Week Recipes

It’s Sugar Awareness Week, and we’re helping you cut back on the sugar that comes in some store-bought staples with these low-sugar Sugar Awareness Week recipes.

Skip the canned soup. Instead, make this Thick Vegetable Soup for the Freezer and still have it on hand for easy dinners.

Thick Vegetable Soup for the Freezer
Image and Recipe via Just a Pinch

 

Bottled smoothies are generally full of extra sugar, but making them homemade is quick and easy with these 8 Staple Smoothies.

8 Staple Smoothies
Image and Recipe via Wholefully

 

Try these Low-Sugar Sweet & Salty Cereal Bars with your kids and skip the sugary store-bought versions.

Low Sugar Sweet & Salty Cereal Bars

 

This summer staple can be full of sugar, but these Homemade Baked Beans are just full of flavor.

Homemade Baked Beans Image and Recipe via The Healthy Chef

 

Granola is only a health food if it’s not full of sugar! Make this Healthy Banana Bread Granola.

Healthy Banana Bread Granola

 

Fruit yogurts from the store are typically full of added sugar, but these 5 Make-Ahead Fruit & Greek Yogurt Parfaits are easy, full of protein, and light on sugar.

5 Make-Ahead Fruit & Greek Yogurt Parfaits

5 Make-Ahead Fruit & Greek Yogurt Parfait Ideas to Try for Breakfast

 

Protein bars are filling, but generally too sugar-filled. Make these 15 Low-Sugar, No-Bake Energy Balls instead.

15 low sugar, no bake energy balls you NEED in your life!

Hunt for Happiness Week

Hunt for Happiness Week

It’s Hunt for Happiness Week, and it’s the perfect time of year to find what makes you happy and figure out how to prioritize it in the new year.

If you’re not eating healthy meals or getting enough sleep, you may not be ready to focus on what makes you happy. Start with the basics that give you the foundation you’ll need for happiness.

Start with the Basics for Happiness

 

Think about what you want to focus on and what makes you happy in 2019 by making a vision board on your Pinterest.

Making Your Happiness Vision Board

 

Don’t treat the blues with something you’ll feel guilty about later. Skip the fast food burger and instead go for a hike, sing along to your favorite album, or cuddle your pet.

Create a happy space in your home. Use colors and artwork you love, your favorite candle and music, a cozy throw or sweater, and a favorite activity. Spend time in it daily.

Happy Space in Your Home

 

What made you happiest as a child? Pick up a puzzle, adult coloring book, or your baseball glove and relive your happiest childhood activities.

Relive Childhood Happiness

 

Appreciate the everyday moments of happiness in your life, whether that’s your morning coffee, time playing with your kids, or watching TV with your loved ones at night.

Appreciate the Small Happy Moments

 

Research shows that giving can make you happier and more grateful. Find a cause you believe in and volunteer or join a charity 5k with friends.

Giving Is Good for Happiness

National Braille Literacy Month

National Braille Literacy Month

It’s National Braille Literacy Month, and despite growing technology, braille is still important. 70% of blind adults are unemployed, but of those who are employed, 90% can read braille.

Despite Tech, Braille Matters

 

There are over 60,000 blind children in the U.S., but only 10% of blind students are learning to read with braille.

Literacy for blind students depends upon braille, and it’s proven to help them gain independence and employment as adults.

Independence Through Braille

 

60% of blind students drop out of school, and not being able to read plays a huge part. Imagine not being able to reread a sentence as you’re learning new words or not being able to understand literature.

The Importance of Reading for Finishing School

 

Partially sighted children are the ones most likely to be left behind in both print and braille reading.

Partially Sighted Students Getting Left Behind

 

85% of blind students go to public schools, but many states don’t require them to teach braille, despite how it helps prepare students for the future.

Preparing Blind Students for the Future

 

Students who learn braille are more likely to finish high school, go to college, have better self-esteem, and get jobs as adults.

A Brighter Future with Braille

Healthy Meal Prep Lunches

Healthy Meal Prep Lunches

As you strive to stay on track with your New Year’s goals, whip up these healthy meal prep lunches at home to eat well all week long and save money.

First, skip the takeout and whip up these grab-and-go Mason Jar Burrito Bowls.

Mason Jar Burrito Bowls

Mason Jar Burrito Bowls

 

Whip up this delicious Chicken Lo Mein packed with veggies for a meal prep lunch the family will love.

Chicken Lo Mein Noodles + Video

 

This light and tasty Lemon Roasted Salmon will leave you full but not sleepy in the afternoon.

Lemon Roasted Salmon
Image and Recipe via Little Spice Jar

 

No need for wings, whip up these Instant Pot Buffalo Chicken Meatballs for that craving instead.

Instant Pot Buffalo Chicken Meatballs

Instant Pot Buffalo Chicken Meatballs Meal Prep

 

Cuban-Style Tuna Meal Prep Bowls are perfect for using the canned favorite in a new way.

Cuban-Style Tuna Meal Prep Bowls (Gluten-Free, Paleo)

 

All of the flavor of spring rolls is ready on the go with this Mason Jar Deconstructed Spring Roll.

Mason Jar Deconstructed Spring Roll
Image and Recipe via Carmy

 

Beautiful, veggie-packed Chicken Hummus Naan Wraps are the ideal boost of protein for lunch.

Chicken Hummus Naan Wraps
Image and Recipe via The Rising Spoon

Tacking Seasonal Affective Disorder

Understanding Seasonal Affective Disorder

Seasonal affective disorder, or SAD, is when you experience symptoms of depression as the seasons change. Most often, these feelings are tied to the fall and winter. But you can take charge to feel better during these months.

Seasonal Affective Disorder and Winter

 

Symptoms of winter-onset SAD include oversleeping, exhaustion, low energy, gaining weight, and appetite changes, like craving carbs and heavy foods.

Symptoms of Winter-Onset SAD

 

Symptoms of summer-onset SAD include trouble sleeping, agitation, anxiety, losing weight, and poor appetite.

Symptoms of Summer-Onset SAD

 

While doctors aren’t certain of the cause of seasonal affective disorder, some factors that contribute to it include how your biological clock, serotonin levels (which affect mood), and melatonin levels (which affect sleep patterns) are affected by reduced sunlight.

Factors Causing SAD

 

SAD is more common for those with depression, bipolar disorder, a family history of these conditions, and those living far from the equator with short days in the winter.

Risk of Seasonal Affective Disorder

 

Seasonal affective disorder can cause people to withdraw from their social circles, affect their performance in school or work, increase the risk of substance abuse, worsen other mental health issues (like anxiety), and in extreme cases, lead to suicidal thoughts and behavior.

Issues Caused by SAD

 

Treatment for this disorder can include light therapy, antidepressants, therapy, and relaxation techniques like tai chi, yoga, meditation, or art therapy. Talk to your doctor to find the right fit for you.

Treating Seasonal Affective Disorder

Healthy Food Habits

Healthy Food Habits for the New Year

It’s a new year, and instead of setting huge dieting goals, we recommend focusing on small healthy food habits that will improve your relationship with food.

First, make sure you’re drinking your daily recommended water, six to eight 8-ounce glasses a day. Not only is preventing dehydration good for you, but it can help reduce hunger between meals.

Drink Enough Water

 

Don’t give up your favorite foods. Instead, focus on smaller quantities and servings.

 

Cook your veggies in tasty ways. Steamed veggies are easy, but usually bland. Try roasting, sautéing, or spiralizing your veggies, and don’t forget the seasonings and herbs!

Flavorful Cooking

 

Food prep has been linked to better eating because it’s convenient to grab when you’re hungry. Prep after you get back from the store.

Food Prep Is Key

Keeping Things Fresh

 

Eat filling lunches that can help you get through the rest of the work day, and then eat smaller dinners to avoid feeling too full and sleepy early in the evening.

Strive to eat fruits and veggies across the color range each day. Not only will it help you get in all your servings of veggies and nutrients, but the variety has been shown to help people eat bigger meals without increasing calories.

Eat the Rainbow

 

Don’t focus on perfection. Everyone splurges on food sometimes, but the key is to get back to healthy eating after that rather than spiraling out of control.  

Splurging Doesn't Ruin Your Diet

Fall Prevention Tips

Fall Prevention Tips

Falls cause broken bones, traumatic brain injuries, and over 95% of hip fractures in older adults, and winter weather is just one reason for them. This week’s fall prevention tips can help you protect yourself and loved ones.

Get your eyes checked each year, and always keep your glasses prescription as up to date as possible.

Healthy Vision

 

Ask your doctor to review all your meds and see if there are other options for any drugs that might be increasing your risk of falling.

Your Medication

 

Fall-proof your home. Adding grab bars in the bathroom and railings to stairs and improving the lighting in your home can make a huge difference.

Fall Proof Your Home

 

Get enough calcium and Vitamin D with foods and drinks like dairy, soy milk, orange juice, and salmon, or take a regular supplement.

Nutrition and Weight Management Resources

 

Get tested for osteoporosis, which can increase your risk of falls and serious injuries from falling.

Remove clutter. A messy house can actually increase your chance of falling at home.

Warning Signs of Hoarding

 

Get active! There are great options and resources for getting healthy at any age. Tai chi is especially helpful for improving your balance and leg strength.

Your Ultimate Guide to Fall Prevention