Tag Archives: sleep deprivation

Smart Caffeine Consumption

National Caffeine Month

It’s National Caffeine Month, and you should know how much is safe. How much is too much?

Up to 400 mg a day is safe for most healthy adults, which is roughly 4 cups of coffee, 10 cans of cola, or 2 energy shot drinks. But remember, there is more than just caffeine in those drinks.

Caffeine Overload

 

Caffeine’s not a good idea for kids. You should try to limit them to no more than 100 mg per day.

Kids and Energy Drinks

 

Drinking too much has side effects, like making you jittery, nervous, and irritable and upsetting your stomach.

Too much can also give you muscle tremors, including a fast heartbeat. Cutting back can also help with heart arrhythmia.

Your Heart and Caffeine

 

It might also be to blame if you always have problems falling asleep, and getting enough sleep is important.

Sleep Deprivation from Caffeine

 

Some medications and supplements may interact with caffeine, including some antibiotics, theophylline, and Echinacea.

Echinacea Supplements

 

Find ways to cut back, and you’ll also probably be cutting back on sugar.

Cutting Caffeine

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Stop the Tossing and Turning

My Healthy Journey: Finding Time for Sleep

It’s been a busy year for my team at Health Alliance, so I hope you’ve been enjoying Nicole’s Chasing Health series while I’ve been too busy to post!

When life gets busy and stress takes over, the first thing that always goes for me is sleep. I’ve never been very good at getting a lot of it, even though it’s one of my favorite things in the world, especially when stress sets in.

Unfortunately, that’s not doing my health any favors:

The Dangers of Sleep Deprivation
Image via Mind Body Green

And since stress and being too busy already make some of these things worse, like my mood and healthy eating flying out the window, not getting enough sleep on top of all that is not good.

Not to mention that it’s definitely not helping my work:

What Happens When Your Brain Doesn't Sleep?
Image via Science.Mic

The moral is clearly that sometimes, you have to make taking care of yourself a priority, which is unfortunately easier said than done.

Rally, our online wellness tool, can help by offering missions that help you get 7 to 8 hours of sleep, stick to a bedtime, start a bedtime ritual, and sleep better.

As for me, what can I do to get better sleep?

I’m taking notes from this video and this handy list of 27 Easy Ways to Sleep Better Tonight from Greatist.

  • Start a bedtime routine. I used to have one, but that’s all but disappeared the last 6 months. I need to start again, and I’m going to try adding drinking something warm (and decaffeinated) to that schedule.
  • Listen to soothing music. Normally, I leave something playing on Netflix as I fall asleep, but soothing music or a sound machine, without the light, would be a much better idea. Maybe I can make use of Adele’s new album or apps like Rain, Rain, which makes thunderstorm noises.
  • Cut back on electronics. This and making my bed a work-free zone are nearly impossible for me, but I do need to work on cutting back. Setting a curfew when I set down my phone or laptop, like at least a half hour before bed, could really help.
  • Make your bed cozy. I mentioned this in my resolutions for this year, but I’ve just gotten around to digging out my cozy stuff for this winter.

A Cozy Bed

  • Make up for lost sleep. Adding an extra hour when I didn’t get enough sleep the night before could help me with my sleep debt.
  • Don’t toss and turn. I do this a lot, and if I can’t fall asleep for more than 20 minutes, I should try getting up and doing something relaxing (NOT work), like knitting or reading.

One thing I can tell you I won’t be trying off this list? Kicking my pet out of my bed.

While I know this must be a problem for some people, I don’t think it’s a problem for me. And I’m not alone. A new study finds that 41% of people think having their pet in the room helps them sleep better.

I know that I would worry about her if she wasn’t in my room. Plus, cuddling her is about the most relaxing activity in my life. In fact, that’s frequently how I fall asleep now. I mean, how can you resist that?

Sleepy Tootsie

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Getting Sleep with Diabetes

Getting Enough Sleep with Diabetes

The Effects of Not Getting Enough Sleep

Over the last decade, the number of hours Americans sleep has fallen fast. According to the National Sleep Foundation, 72% of people sleep 7 hours or less, up 10% from 2001, which can have serious health effects. And getting enough sleep with diabetes is even more important.

“The public is less aware of the impact of insufficient amounts of sleep,” said Dr. Megan Ruiter, lead author of the National Sleep Foundation’s report. “Sleep is important—the body is stressed when it doesn’t get the right amount.”

Not only does sleep affect your body’s stress level, it also affects your blood glucose levels. A 2006 study in the Archives of Internal Medicine found people who say they sleep poorly have higher A1cs.

Studies confirm sleep-deprived bodies make an average of 32% less insulin after a meal, leading to higher blood glucose.

Tips for Getting Sleep with Diabetes

Here are some helpful tips for a good night’s rest from Diabetes Forecast.

Set a schedule.

Go to bed and wake up around the same time every day. This can help your body establish a healthy sleep/wake cycle.

Avoid nicotine, caffeine, and alcohol.

These substances can disrupt sleep. It’s best to avoid them before bed.

Get in the mood.

A bedtime routine can help you shift from being awake to feeling sleepy. Take a bath or listen to peaceful music just before you turn the lights out.

Exercise earlier in the day.

Active people sleep better. Do your exercise in the morning or right after work for the best results.

Prep your bedroom.

Make sure it’s dark, quiet, relaxing, and at a cool (yet comfortable) temperature. Turn off (or silence) cell phones, TVs, and computers.

Don’t go to bed on a full or empty tank.

Eating a big meal just before bed or lying down with a growling stomach can make falling asleep tricky and can even wake you. If you’re going to eat a big evening meal, eat two hours before bed to give yourself enough time to digest.