Tag Archives: security

Internet Safety and Privacy

Internet Safety

In honor of Safer Internet Day earlier this month, we helped you and your family practice internet safety all week.

Make sure you’re not accidentally giving out personal information you wouldn’t want on the internet, like your phone number or address, to any individuals or companies you don’t know or have never heard of.

Never share your password with anyone. If you do have to share one, like your wifi password, use one that’s not tied to any important accounts. A secure password manager can help you if you struggle to keep track of your passwords.

Safely Managing Your Passwords

 

When creating screen names, don’t include any important personal information, like your last name or birthdate, and help your children set up any accounts they have to protect their info.

Safely Setting Up Accounts Online

 

Protecting your kids in the age of technology can be tricky. Make sure you know how to enable parental controls across devices.

Protecting Your Kids Online

 

You don’t have to be a tech wizard to practice better privacy safety online. Securing your browser, using anti-virus software, keeping programs up to date, and paying attention to settings on your accounts is an easy way to get started with digital security.

Learn to Protect Yourself Online

 

For many of us, social media is a way to share our lives with loved ones. But sharing personal details, your location, or even family photos can be risky. Adjust your social media privacy settings to protect your info.

Social Media Privacy Settings

 

Be smart shopping online. If a website looks old and outdated or if you can’t find any reviews or press coverage for their company in a quick search, don’t enter your credit card info into their site. Services like PayPal can also protect your money and info.

Online Shopping Safety

Helpful Thanksgiving Travel Tips

Thanksgiving Travel Tips for Flying

According to AAA, nearly 51 million people in the United States traveled during Thanksgiving weekend last year, and 36 million of those were flying. Assist America, our emergency travel assistance partner, has a few handy Thanksgiving travel tips to help get you through the airport and on your flight in as little time as possible.

Sign Up for Airport Membership Programs

Airport programs like TSA PreCheck and CLEAR are 2 of the most helpful programs for getting through security lines quickly. TSA PreCheck grants low-risk travelers access to expedited security screenings when traveling domestically. And CLEAR offers their members quick security and screening lines. However, these programs require you to sign up well in advance. The process for getting approved can take anywhere from a few weeks to 6 months.

Global Entry is a program for faster clearance once you arrive in the U.S. and is perfect for international travelers. Finally, NEXUS was specifically created for travelers who frequently go between the U.S. and Canada.

Be Ready for Security Screening

Make sure you carry as little metal, such as jewelry, belts, coins, and keys, as possible. You might want to store them in your carry-on or in a plastic bag before you reach the security checkpoint. Security will also usually ask you to take your laptop, tablet, and camera out of your bags for screening, unless you’re enrolled in TSA PreCheck.

Resealable plastic bags are also ideal for storing liquids and gels, whether you’re packing them in your carry-on or a checked bag. Remember you’re limited to 3.4 ounce or smaller containers if you’re going through security with your liquids.

Keep prescription medications in a bag in your carry-on, so security can inspect them by hand if needed.

Lastly, remember that coats and shoes usually need to be removed. To make the process quicker, be sure to wear socks and easily removable shoes. Travelers over 75 years old may be allowed to keep shoes and a light jacket on. You can also have a head covering on during the screening process, however if it’s too concealing, you may have to go through a pat-down screening as well.

Tricks to Avoid Long Lines

To avoid long lines, avoid traveling at peak travel times, which are Wednesday and Sunday for Thanksgiving weekend. The further away from these days you can travel, the better. Low-fare seats are often more widely available on Tuesday or Thanksgiving Day. If you can leave on Saturday or Monday, you’ll probably enjoy less-crowded airports for your return home.

One trick to go through airport lines quicker is to avoid ones with a lot of families or older people and go for the lines with business people, who tend to be more efficient when it comes to traveling. Luckily, wait times have also shrunk since the TSA decided to let travelers under 12 and over 75 leave their shoes on going through security.

Download Air Travel Apps

Waiting in line can also be cut shorter if you download the airline’s app and check in before you get to the airport. You can also monitor the airport’s wait times with your phone using the TripIt app or the MyTSA app. This may help you decide when you need to leave home to make it to your flight on time.

 

These tips will help you make it through the airport quickly, so you can get back to focusing on enjoying your Thanksgiving break.

Enjoy this Thanksgiving weekend with your family and friends and we wish you safe travels wherever this holiday takes you!

Fraud Awareness with the Right Payment

Fraud Awareness for National Fraud Awareness Week

Last week was National Fraud Awareness Week, and there’s no better time to think about protecting yourself. These fraud awareness tips can help.

If you’re cold-called and asked for an immediate decision to buy something, beware. A legitimate company lets you have time to choose.

Telemarketers and Fraud

 

Check the Better Business Bureau to see if a company is listed and its ratings and reviews.

Shop Smart with Recommendations

 

Search for the business online. Legitimate businesses usually have websites and a web presence. Scammers are more likely to change their online name regularly to avoid bad reviews.

Search for Businesses

 

Protect yourself online with virus protection software and by creating strong passwords.

Online Security to Prevent Fraud

 

Don’t open suspicious emails from people you don’t know, and don’t download files from people or sites you don’t trust.

Your Email Safety

 

Pay smart. Credit cards have fraud protection built in, but wiring money, cash, or reloadable cards make it impossible to get your money back.

Don’t always trust free trials, which can sign you up for products you have to cancel to get out of. And sign up for scam alerts from the FTC.

Be Smart About Free Trials

Packing for Traveling with Diabetes

Packing Your Pump: Traveling with Diabetes

Traveling is already stressful. When you add in you or your family’s diabetes, it just gets worse. But, like all vacation planning, good prep is key to making sure traveling with diabetes goes smoothly.

Preparation for Traveling with Diabetes

It’s best to travel when your diabetes is under control, so schedule a check up with your doctor before your trip if you need to.

Make sure you have enough of current prescriptions to take while traveling. With some things, you can stock up in advance. For others, you may have to take your prescription with you and get it filled on the road. Make sure you also know which pharmacies your plan covers before getting a prescription filled there.

Keep a document that lists all of the medicines and supplies you’re traveling with. Not only can it help you pack before leaving home or the hotel, but you can also show it to security agents at airports to help them check your supplies quickly.

Call or check out your insulin pump company’s website before you fly. Not all pumps can go through the X-ray machines safely, so it’s important to check for yours. If your pump can’t go through, let one of the TSA agents know and ask for a pat down check instead.

Packing for Traveling with Diabetes

According to the TSA, most diabetes supplies, including insulin, pumps, unused syringes, lancets, and blood glucose meters are allowed in your carry-on.

It’s important that you pack supplies and snacks in your carry-on so that you can monitor your diabetes during the flight without problems.

Keep medications in their original containers, and keep them in a separate, clear plastic bag. This makes it easy for security to check what kind of meds you have and that they’re yours.

Use your list to make sure you’ve packed everything you need to take care of your diabetes.

If your kids are traveling without you, it’s important to both help them pack their supplies, and to make sure they have their emergency plan and important numbers, like your phone number and their blood sugar levels, handy when traveling.

At the Airport

Once you’re at the airport, the key to a smooth flight is communication.

Make sure you tell the security officers you are traveling with diabetes supplies and meds and if you need a pat down or your bag checked by hand to protect your pump.

Use a phone, an app, or a watch that can stay on your home time zone, so you can keep track of when you should be eating and taking medicine on your normal schedule. It’s easy to get distracted on vacation, so alarms are also an easy way to remind yourself at the right time.

Once you’re on your flight, if you feel sick and need food, a drink, or to get your carry-on quickly, it can help if you let your flight attendant know what’s happening. They can help you better and faster if they know it’s important for your diabetes.

Always make sure you’re wearing your shoes after you go through security and on your flight. Never go barefoot to protect your feet.

After Arriving

Once you’ve made it to your hotel, it’s a good idea to make sure your supplies are still organized after the flight.

Make sure you’re still keeping track of meals, meds, and your levels like you would at home. Try to plan activities so you’ll have plenty of time to go back to your room to check your levels or take meds, or be ready to bring things with you.

And of course, watch what you eat. Vacation is a good time to enjoy yourself, but still keep a good count of your carbs.

With a little extra planning, diabetes won’t be able to stand in your way of an amazing trip!

Traveling with Asthma and Allergies

Traveling with Asthma and Allergies

Vacations are always exciting and relaxing, unless you aren’t prepared for traveling with asthma and allergies.

Don’t let them stand in your family’s way. By carefully getting ready ahead of time, you can make sure you have smooth travels.

Preparing for Traveling with Asthma and Allergies

Having a great trip starts when you’re planning. When you’re looking at destinations and hotels for your family, you may want to find a PURE hotel room. Hotels across the country are adding these hypoallergenic rooms.

From installing air purifiers to ripping out dust-filled carpets and drapes, these rooms have been overhauled to be allergy-friendly. You may pay a little extra (about $20 more), but by getting rid of allergens and surprise asthma flare-ups, a PURE room can make your trip an easy one.

And don’t forget to make sure you have enough of current prescriptions ahead of time. With some things, you can stock up in advance. For others, you may have to take your prescription with you and get it filled on the road. Make sure you also know which pharmacies your plan covers before getting a prescription filled there.

Keep a document that lists all of the medicines and supplies you’re traveling with. Not only can it help you pack before leaving home or the hotel, but you can also show it to security agents at airports to help them check your supplies quickly.

Packing for Traveling with Asthma and Allergies

According to the TSA, you can pack your meds or nebulizer in your carry-on for your flight.

It’s important to pack both your quick-relief and controller meds in your carry-on so that you can treat or prevent an attack on the flight. Plus, if your checked bag gets lost, at least your asthma’s still taken care of.

Keep medications in their original containers, and keep them in a separate, clear plastic bag. This makes it easy for security to check what kind of meds you have and that they’re yours.

Pack copies of your Asthma Action Plan which has important info about your asthma that can help those traveling with you and the people you visit if something should happen.

Use your list to make sure you’ve packed everything you need to take care of your asthma.

Take your Health Alliance member ID card in case you need to visit a doctor while you’re out of town.

If you aren’t getting a PURE room, pack your own bedding, like any special pillows, sheets, or bed covers.

If your kids are traveling without you, it’s important to both help them pack their meds, and to make sure they have their emergency plan and important numbers, like your phone number, handy when traveling.

Traveling with Asthma and Allergies

Once you’re at the airport, the key to a smooth flight is communication.

Make sure you tell the security officers you are traveling with asthma meds or a nebulizer, which they will have you take out of your case.

Use a phone, an app, or a watch that can stay on your home time zone, so you can keep track of when you should be taking medicine on your normal schedule. It’s easy to get distracted on vacation, so alarms are also an easy way to remind yourself at the right time.

Once you’re on your flight, if you feel sick and need help, a drink, or to get your carry-on quickly, it can help if you let your flight attendant know what’s happening. They can help you better and faster if they know it’s important for your asthma.

When you’re driving, fresh air sounds like a great idea, but you never know what allergens are in it. Drive with the windows up and the air on to keep triggers out. And, keep your meds close, not in the trunk!

After Arriving

Once you’ve made it to your hotel, it’s a good idea to make sure your supplies are still organized after traveling. You should also make sure your room is clean, and change your bedding if you brought it with you.

Try to plan activities that won’t stress your asthma or put you in contact with too many allergens, and make sure you’re ready to carry your inhaler, just in case.

And don’t forget to take time to relax and refuel for a vacation to remember!