Tag Archives: seafood

National Seafood Month

National Seafood Month

It’s National Seafood Month, so it’s the perfect time to lighten up classics with your favorite seafood in these healthy seafood recipes.

First up is a pretty and simple Smoky Grilled Salmon with Avocado Salad.

Smoky Grilled Salmon with Avocado Salad
Image and Recipe via The Modern Proper

 

Make this Taco Tuesday seafood-themed with Blackened Cod Fish Tacos with Sriracha Lime Crema.

Blackened Cod Fish Tacos with Sriracha Lime Crema
Image and Recipe via The College Housewife

 

Lighten up the southern classic with this Cajun Shrimp Étouffée recipe.

Cajun Shrimp Étouffée
Image and Recipe via Little Spice Jar

 

This Sesame Seared Tuna with Lime Ginger Vinaigrette is the perfect refreshing meal.

Sesame Seared Tuna with Lime Ginger Vinaigrette

Sesame Seared Tuna with Lime Ginger Vinaigrette

 

Craving comfort food? This healthy take on Spanish Seafood Paella will hit the spot.

Spanish Seafood Paella

Spanish Seafood Paella Recipe (Healthy)

 

Dinner will be easy with this Mediterranean Baked Fish with Artichokes and Olives.

Mediterranean Baked Fish with Artichokes and Olives
Image and Recipe via The Forked Spoon

 

Skip the takeout with these colorful and tasty Chipotle Lime Shrimp Bowls.

How to Stay Healthy While Traveling

5 Tips to Stay Healthy While Traveling

Traveling is amazing! What’s not to love about discovering new places, meeting new people and trying new foods? But, traveling also means that your fitness, eating, and sleep habits are disrupted, which can affect your overall health. Assist America, our travel emergency assistance partner has tips for helping you stay healthy while traveling. 

  1. Adopt a Go-To Travel Exercise Routine.

To-Go Travel Routine

If you travel regularly, create an exercise routine that can easily be adapted to your environment and that you can commit to when you’re on-the-go. Your routine should be simple and short, with exercises you can do in a hotel room, a gym, a park, or even on a beach.

If you are a runner, make sure to pack your running gear with you. Running is a great way to discover a destination from a different angle.

If working out isn’t your thing, simply set aside 10 minutes in the morning to stretch before you start your day and another 5 minutes at night to wind down. It will help you relax and energize your body. 

  1. Choose Walking Over Cabs or Public Transportation.

Choose Walking

Whenever you can, choose to walk rather than hop in a cab, bus, or subway since walking is beneficial for your health. It helps improve circulation, sleep, and breathing. It also strengthens muscles, supports your joints, and can lead to weight loss. 

  1. Hydrate, Hydrate, Hydrate!

Hydrate, Hydrate, Hydrate

Reusable water bottles are your best travel ally. Once you get through airport security check points, fill up your bottle at a nearby water fountain and make sure you keep drinking water on the plane.

Once you’ve arrived at your destination, fill up before you leave your hotel room if it’s safe to drink the tap water at your destination. If it’s not, ask the hotel for unopened water bottles or buy some at a store nearby. And don’t forget to drink plenty of water at restaurants or even hanging out by the pool.

  1. Commit to One Healthy Meal a Day

One Healthy Meal a Day

While there’s nothing wrong with trying new foods and enjoying big meals, having several rich meals per day can be hard on your body.

If you’re staying at a rental or an apartment-hotel, take advantage of the kitchen by cooking simple meals depending on your schedule. If you’re going to be eating out a lot, opt for vegetarian dishes, choose grilled options over fried, try some fresh seafood, and look at the salad menu. 

  1. Sleep! 

Get Enough Sleep While Traveling

Changing time zones, walking all day, carrying suitcases, all of these can be harsh on your body and your energy. Just being away from your own bed can make it hard to fall asleep. Make sure to rest and to get plenty of sleep by blocking out the lights, reducing the noise, and turning your phone off.

 

If you incorporate these tips into your travel routine, we guarantee you will feel refreshed and full of energy to enjoy each of your trips to their fullest!

Healthy Seafood Recipes

Healthy Seafood Recipes

Seafood is a wonderful light protein to break up your nights of chicken. These healthy seafood recipes are perfect for light summer meals.

First up is a lightened take on a restaurant favorite, Parmesan Baked Popcorn Shrimp.

Parmesan Baked Popcorn Shrimp
Image and Recipe via Rasamalaysia

 

This Blackened Fish Burger with spicy mayo is the right way to take a break from fast food.

blackened fish burger + sriracha mayo

 

Meal prep is easy and delicious with Caribbean Jerk Shrimp with Cauliflower Rice.

Caribbean Jerk Shrimp with Cauliflower Rice

 

Teriyaki Salmon is the perfect way to introduce someone to the healthy seafood.

Teriyaki Salmon
Image and Recipe via North South Blonde

 

Whip up for a light and tasty 20-Minute Lemon, Garlic, and Herb Baked Cod.

20-Minute Lemon, Garlic, and Herb Baked Cod
Image and Recipe via Baker By Nature

 

15-Minute Garlic Shrimp Zoodles are much healthier for you than the typical shrimp scampi out.

15-Minute Garlic Shrimp Zoodles
Image and Recipe via Salt and Lavender

 

Break out the grill this spring with Easy Grilled Mahi with Avocado and Corn Salsa.

Easy Grilled Mahi with Avocado and Corn Salsa
Image and Recipe via Laughing Spatula

Pregnancy Health Problems

Pregnancy Health Problems

If you have a preexisiting health problem or develop a new one during your pregnancy, you may need more care. Pregnancy health problems that can occur include:

Blood Pressure Related Conditions

While your blood pressure is always an important part of your overall health, when you’re pregnant, it becomes even more important to monitor it. High blood pressure can constrict the blood vessels in your uterus that supply your baby with oxygen and nutrients.

Chronic Hypertension

This is high blood pressure before you become pregnant. If you have it, it won’t go away after you deliver.

There are usually no signs, the only way to diagnose it is with blood pressure monitoring.

Your doctor may prescribe medication or liestyle changes. If you’re already on hypertension meds, talk to your doctor before trying to conceive. ACE inhibitors, a common kind of blood pressure meds, can be bad for your baby.

Pregnancy-Induced Hypertension (PIH)

Some women develop high blood pressure about 20 weeks into their pregnancy. PIH will usually go away after you deliver.

There are usually no signs, the only way to diagnose it is with blood pressure monitoring.

PIH can be controlled with meds during pregnancy.

Preeclampsia

This is high blood pressure and protein in your urine that usually develops after 30 weeks. 25% of women who have PIH develop this too.

There are usually no signs, the only way to diagnose it is with blood pressure monitoring.

Preeclampsia can be controlled with meds during pregnancy.

HELLP syndrome

This is a variation of preeclampsia that’s diagnosed by blood tests. It stands for the conditions you develop:

  • Hemolytic anemia
  • Elevated liver enzymes
  • Low platelets

Most women with HELLP have high blood pressure, and other symptoms include fatigue, severe headaches, nausea, vomiting, and swelling.

The only treatment is to deliver your baby. HELLP is very serious and requires care from a doctor.

Gestational Diabetes

Even if you don’t have diabetes before you get pregnant, you can develop gestational diabetes. It will go away after you have your baby, but during your pregnancy, you may be required to follow a special diet, exercise, or take insulin.

Environmental Risk

Certain substances can be harmful to your baby, raising the risk of birth defects and miscarriage. Chemicals to avoid include:

  • Cigarette smoke
  • Lead in water or paint
  • Some cleaners
  • Pesticides
  • Mercury in tuna and other fish
  • Cat litter boxes

Talk to your doctor about how to avoid these chemicals and what to do if you come in contact with any of them.

Chicken Pox

While most women are immune if they’ve had chicken pox or the vaccine before, it can be dangerous if you catch it while pregnant. Tell your doctor right away if you come in contact with someone who has it or if you believe you have it.

HIV/AIDS

You can pass HIV/AIDS to your baby during pregnancy, labor, or delivery if you already have it. You can take meds to protect your baby during your pregnancy, just talk to your doctor about it.

Sexually Transmitted Infections (STIs)

If you have an STI, it can cause your baby to be born blind, deaf, or even stillborn. Medication can usually help protect your baby during pregnancy and delivery. Tell your doctor right away if you have an STI or develop one while you are pregnant.

Healthy Papaya Recipes

Healthy Papaya Recipes for National Papaya Month

It’s National Papaya Month. Summer is the perfect time to try out the tropical fruit with these healthy papaya recipes.

These tasty Papaya, Banana & Coconut Muffins make a great breakfast or snack.

Papaya, Banana & Coconut Muffins

Whip up Thai Fish Burgers with Green Mango & Papaya Slaw for your next get-together.

Thai Fish Burgers with Green Mango & Papaya Slaw

This easy Strawberry Papaya Salad is light and refreshing for an afternoon snack.

Strawberry Papaya Salad

Replace the takeout with this bright and beautiful Chicken and Papaya Stir Fry.

Chicken and Papaya Stir Fry
Image and Recipe via Food & Wine

 

Ditch the pudding cup with this rich Mango and Papaya Chia Pudding with Apricot.

Mango and Papaya Chia Pudding with Apricot
Image and Recipe via Anna Banana

 

Make the most of fresh, light fish with Pan Seared Mahi Mahi with Mango Papaya Salsa.

Pan Seared Mahi Mahi with Mango Papaya Salsa

Fall in love with this refreshing Vegan Ice Cream with Papaya and Coconut Milk as a tropical treat.

Vegan Ice Cream with Papaya and Coconut Milk
Image and Recipe via Farm on Plate

Foraging for Morel Mushroom Recipes

Healthy Morel Mushroom Recipes

It’s wild mushroom season, and we featured morel mushroom recipes you can make with fresh or dried mushrooms.

This Les Bourgeois Beef with morel sauce will wow dinner guests.

Les Bourgeois Beef

 

Make Asparagus and Morel Quiche to add a savory bite to your breakfast.

Asparagus and Morel Quiche

 

This Golden Trout with Asparagus, Morels, and Tomato Sauce is an all-in-one meal.

Golden Trout

 

Homemade Cream of Wild Mushroom Soup is a lighter take on the canned favorite.

Cream of Wild Mushroom Soup
Image and Recipe via Simply Recipes

 

Morel and Asparagus Crispy Pizza packs veggies onto your favorite kind of takeout.

Morel and Asparagus Crispy Pizza

 

This Chicken Fricassee with Morel Mushrooms and Thyme is great for date night.

Chicken Fricassee with Morel Mushrooms and Thyme

 

This Spring Pasta with Morels, Ramps, and Peas is the perfect rich spring meal.

Spring Pasta with Morels, Ramps, and Peas

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Food Expiration Dates and Safety

Decoding Expiration Dates

Did you know the government doesn’t make food companies put expiration dates on most things? They choose to put those dates on their products so that you get the best quality as a customer, which is why there are so many different kinds of labels.

According to the Boston Globe, 3/4 of Americans think eating things after their printed dates is unsafe. That’s not always true.

What Do the Expiration Dates Mean?

“Sell by” Date

This tells the store how long it can sell the product. You should buy it before this day, but it doesn’t mean that it’s bad after that date. It really just means that it’s freshest before that date.

“Best if used by (or before)” Date

You should use a product before this date for the best quality and flavor, but it has nothing to do with safety.

“Guaranteed fresh” Date

This is usually used for bakery items. You can still eat them after this date, but they won’t be at their freshest.

“Use by” Date

This is the last date a product’s maker recommends you use it for the best quality, much like “best if used by or before” dates.

“Pack” Date

These are dates that are on many canned or packaged goods. They’re used by the manufacturer and do not tell you if the food is safe. They may also be in a code, usually month-day-year, like MMDDYY. So September 29, 2015, would be 092915.

Other Dates

Federal law says that all baby formula must be dated. It is usually marked with a “use by” or “expiration date,” and after that date, the nutrition of the formula begins to decline from what’s shown on the label.

Some states also make stores pull dairy items off the shelves after their expiration dates.

How Long Are Things Good For?

While these dates will help you eat things while they taste the best, you won’t need to rush to throw most things away by those dates.

You should always try to buy your food before these dates expire, but as long as it’s stored at the right temperature and hasn’t been contaminated during cleaning or prep, it can be good after the dates.

Product Dates and Expiration

And of course, it is important to smell and look at your food before you eat it if it’s past those dates (and before them, too). If something smells bad, tastes weird, has rotten spots, or is moldy, don’t eat it! It’s definitely time to throw it away.

You can see more info about dates and food safety from WebMD and the USDA.

Up Next:

Make sure you’re storing your food safely to keep it good for longer.

Are you always cooking things to a safe temperature to avoid foodborne illness? Our guide can help!

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