Tag Archives: safe

Allergy-Friendly Recipes

Allergy-Friendly Recipes

It’s Food Allergy Action Month. These healthy allergy-friendly recipes can help you protect your kids, their friends, and all your loved ones.

First up are these no-bake snacks, Healthy Chewy No-Bake Granola Bars, safe for the kids.

Healthy Chewy No Bake Granola Bars

 

These Gluten-Free and Vegan Goldfish are also lighter than the grocery store staple.

Homemade Gluten-Free + Vegan Goldfish (Allergy-Free, Grain-Free)

 

Whip up Gluten-Free Monster Cookies that are also nut-free for the next class event your kids have.

Gluten Free Monster Cookies (Nut Free, Vegan).

 

Need a kid-friendly breakfast for the next sleepover? Try Life-Saving Pancakes that are gluten-free and egg-free.

Life Saving Pancakes
Image and Recipe via Petite Allergy Treats

 

These Allergy-Friendly Brookies are the perfect combo of cookie and brownie, without the allergies.

Allergy-Friendly Brookies
Image and Recipe via nutritionicity

 

Skip the drive thru with these Allergy-Friendly Chicken Nuggets.

Allergy-Friendly Chicken Nuggets
Image and Recipe via Instructables

 

This beautiful Raspberry, Lime, and Coconut Cheesecake is perfect for an allergy-friendly dessert for guests.

Raspberry, lime and coconut cheesecake

Hot Cocoa and Winter Health Risks

Long View: Cold Hands, Hot Cocoa

I always remember December from my childhood, when the weather got subzero, and the wind was playfully whipping snowflakes around. School was out for the holidays, and my sister and I always loved to play outdoors, despite the frigid temperatures.

We would come downstairs with our garb, and Mom would get us all bundled up to brave the weather. Snowsuits, scarves, hats, gloves, and boots were standard outerwear those days. My mom would secure the scarf so that it would stay put, and the hat would cover my ears and my forehead. When she was through, I could barely see and hardly move.

I remember stiffly walking out the door, hoping that with more movement, I would loosen up enough to enjoy some of the winter wonderland we called our yard. Hot cocoa would be waiting for us when we came in, and it was like magic what that cup of warmth could do!

Today, I run out of the house without a coat, hat, gloves, or scarf, thinking, I’m just going to the car, then running in to work. My days of bundling up are over. This is what happens when you go from 6 years old to 60. But honestly, what am I thinking?

Winter health risks should be a concern for our aging population. (Hey, that’s me too!) The most obvious risk is the weather itself. Midwestern winters can consist of ice and snow. Driving is a challenge. Walking is even more of a challenge. Slips on ice are a major risk, so it’s important to wear the right shoes or boots with good traction if you have to go out.  

Hypothermia is also a common winter weather health risk. Hypothermia means your body temperature has fallen below 95 degrees, and once it gets to that point for a prolonged period of time, you can’t produce enough energy to stay warm.

Symptoms include shivering, cold pale skin, lack of coordination, slowed reactions and breathing, and mental confusion. It’s good to pay attention to how cold it is where you are, whether it’s indoors or outdoors. Also, make sure you’re eating enough to keep up a healthy weight. Body fat helps you stay warm.

Frostbite is another health risk during the winter months. Frostbite means your skin has been over-exposed to cold temperatures, and it usually affects the nose, ears, cheeks, fingers, and toes. It can be severe and cause permanent damage to the skin, and even progress to the bone.

Frostbite can affect anyone who is exposed to below freezing temperatures, in particular, those who aren’t wearing the right clothing. It’s important to wear layers, preferably 2 to 3 layers of loose-fitting clothing, as well as a coat, hat, gloves, and a scarf. Covering up your nose and mouth will also protect your lungs from the cold air.

As for drinking a cup of hot cocoa, well, that is a winter weather health benefit! According to a study at Cornell University, hot cocoa has almost twice as many antioxidants as red wine, and 2 to 3 times more than green tea! This winter, enjoy the magic of the season by keeping yourself safe and warm.

Mervet Adams is a community liaison with Health Alliance. She loves her grandson, family, nature, and fashion.

Healthy Summer Party Recipes

Healthy Summer Party Recipes

This week, we featured safe and healthy summer party recipes that are perfect for your next outdoor get-together.

First up are Healthy Deviled Eggs with Avocado that might be gone before you even have to worry about them sitting out.

Healthy Deviled Eggs with Avocado
Image and Recipe via Chef de Home

 

Throw together this easy Herbed Red Potato Salad that can sit out at your summer party.

Herbed Red Potato Salad (no mayo!)

 

This light Corn and Zucchini Salad with Feta is a great way to get in some sweet corn.

Corn and Zucchini Salad with Feta
Image and Recipe via Bon Appetit

 

July 6 was National Fried Chicken Day. Skip the fryer for your party with this Southern Oven-Fried Chicken.

Southern Oven Fried Chicken

 

Tomato, Onion, and Roasted Lemon Salad is a beautiful dish that’s safe outside on warm days.

Tomato, Onion, and Roasted Lemon Salad
Image and Recipe via Bon Appetit

 

Vegan Pesto Pasta Salad is a light and tasty side for any outdoor get-together.

Vegan Pesto Gluten Free Pasta Salad | Healthy Summer Potluck Recipe

 

Bring along this delicious Clean and Healthy Strawberry Crisp for dessert.

Clean and Healthy Strawberry Crisp

 

And check out our tips for a healthy summer party.

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Happy, Healthy Babies for Baby Safety Month

Baby Safety Month

This week, we went over helpful tips for Baby Safety Month.

Make sure you know how to install your baby’s car seat before big road trips.

Sign up to make sure you get important recall info that will help keep your baby safe.

 

Babies grow so fast that it can be hard to get them the right thing for their age. This can help:

Ages and Stages Infographic
Image via Baby Safety Zone

 

Some hazards aren’t things that jump to mind. Play the Hidden Hazards Game to help know if your baby’s safe.

Protecting Babies From the Unseen Hazard

 

Make sure you’re using strollers safely with these handy tips:

Stroller Safety Tips
Image via Baby Safety Zone

 

Looking for products that keep your kids safe and make your life easier? These can help!

Protecting the Ones You Love

 

Get great safety tips, stay up to date on recalls, build a safe nursery, and more all year at Baby Safety Zone.

Building in Safety for Your Baby

 

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Play for National Parks and Rec Month

National Parks and Rec Month

July is National Parks and Rec Month, and you should take advantage of your community’s parks and activities to get active!

Visit your local pool to cool off and get moving with classes like water aerobics and swim lessons, or at some, you can even join night swims or walk against a lazy river.

Water Workout

 

Stay fit as you get older with walks, exercise classes, and activities from your local park district.

Active as You Age

 

Camps and day camps from your park district can be the perfect summer activity for your kids.

Camp Fun

 

However you want to move, from kickboxing and  yoga to line dancing, your park district has the class for you.

Work Out Your Way

 

Be prepared to save a life with CPR classes from your local park district or hospital.

Save Lives with CPR

 

Find fun, safe events and classes for your teens on things like babysitting.

Safe Teens

 

If you or your kids love to compete, join a team to get active.

Compete Your Way to Fitness

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Safe Summertime Fun with Summer Safety Tips

Summer Safety Tips for Kids

We highlighted some important summer safety tips for your kids.

First up for the 4th of July, make sure you handle fireworks safely.

Fireworks Safety

 

Protect yourself and your kids from skin cancer by playing it safe in the sun.

Skin Cancer Awareness Month

 

Keep it smart around water this summer with these easy tips.

Water Safety

 

Use an insect repellent to prevent bug bites and protect kids from diseases.

Help your kids reach a healthy weight by moving and eating in-season fruits and veggies.

Help Your Kids Reach a Healthy Weight

 

Keep these tips in mind while your kids are playing sports this summer.

Sports Safety Tips

 

Are you ready for the new school year? Make sure your kids are by scheduling checkups now.

Summer Health Checklist

Vaccines for a Healthy Grandchild

Long View: 3 Things Grandparents Should Know About Vaccines

There are few things more exciting in this world than the arrival of a grandchild. The anticipation to see if the baby has your son’s eyes, the enjoyment of picking out all of those adorable baby clothes, and those precious weekends at grandmas!

New grandparents should also remember the importance of protecting their grandchild from preventable illnesses by understanding vaccines. Vaccines are not just important for the newborn, but also for you.

  1. Vaccines Are Safe and Effective

The medical community is in agreement that vaccines are safe, effective, and do not cause serious harm to children. Vaccines are the single most important method to prevent diseases like polio, whooping cough, and the measles. Vaccines go through rigorous testing, and children are far more likely to be harmed by illnesses, like whooping cough and the flu, than by the vaccine itself. The World Health Organization has a useful website debunking myths about vaccines.

  1. Whooping Cough’s On the Rise

Do you think whooping cough is an extinct illness from your childhood? Sadly, because people haven’t been vaccinating their kids, illnesses that were once very rare thanks to high vaccination rates are now reappearing. Whooping cough (pertussis) is one illness that is especially dangerous to newborns. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) reported that in 2014, there were 32,971 reported cases of whooping cough, a 15% increase compared to 2013!

  1. Time for a Booster?

You may be thinking, “Wait! I was already vaccinated against whooping cough when I was a child.” But the CDC recommends you get a Tdap shot, the vaccine that protects against whooping cough, every 10 years or if you’re 65 or older and in close contact with infants. Don’t forget about your annual flu shot either.

Dr. John Beck, Health Alliance vice president and senior medical director, puts the importance of vaccines into perspective. “Most adults were vaccinated as children against pertussis, but protection wears off over time. Babies are able to catch pertussis from family members, including grandparents, who may not know they have it. Grandparents should consider getting a Tdap booster after discussion with their physician,” he said.

Don’t forget to take steps to protect the health of you and your grandbaby. Making precious memories with your new grandchild will be more enjoyable with that peace of mind.

Chris Maxeiner is a community liaison with Health Alliance. His background is in the fields of healthcare and government programs. His favorite superhero is Batman, and he is an avid Chicago sports fan (Bears, Bulls, and White Sox).