Tag Archives: research

ALS Awareness Month

ALS Awareness Month

It’s ALS Awareness Month, and we’ll be helping you learn more about it and make a difference all week long.

What is ALS?

 

Sonal Shah worked hard as an ALS advocate as she battled the disease.

Sonal Shah's ALS Story

 

Joyce McNeal’s determination to overcome and raise awareness have marked her fight against ALS.

Joyce McNeal's ALS Story

 

Learn more about what researchers are focused on to fight ALS.

Researching ALS

 

Where is the research on ALS headed?

 

How can you join the fight against ALS?

 

How does your help go back to ALS patients? Learn more about care services.

National Arthritis Awareness Month

National Arthritis Awareness Month

May is National Arthritis Awareness Month, and arthritis is America’s number one cause of disability. There are also nearly 1 million hospitalizations each year because of arthritis.

Coping with Arthritis

 

Nearly 53 million adults and almost 300,000 babies, kids, and teens have arthritis or a rheumatic condition. Learn more about arthritis.

People with osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis miss 172 million days of work per year. Learn about the different kinds of arthritis and be prepared.

Fighting Back Against Arthritis

 

Many people with arthritis also have other serious conditions. 57% of adults with heart disease, 52% of those with diabetes, and 44% of those with high blood pressure, have arthritis. Learn more about arthritis research.

Struggling with Arthritis and Health Conditions

 

1/3 of adults with arthritis who would normally be working have limitations in their ability to work, and overall, they’re less likely to be employed than those without arthritis. If you have arthritis, learn more about managing your pain.

Arthritis & Work-Life Limitations

 

Arthritis and its related conditions account for over $156 billion in yearly lost wages and medical expenses. If you have arthritis though, you have treatment options.

The Cost of Arthritis

 

If you need support emotionally or the tools and resources to make healthy changes like exercise and diet that can improve your arthritis, the Arthritis Foundation can help.

The Arthritis Support You Need

Learn More for Stomach Cancer Awareness Month

Stomach Cancer Awareness Month

It’s Stomach Cancer Awareness Month, and it’s the 5th most common type of cancer. Learn more.

Fighting Stomach Cancer

 

1 million cases of stomach cancer are diagnosed each year.

Stomach Cancer Facts

 

Stomach cancer is the 3rd-highest cause of cancer deaths, behind only lung and liver cancer.

Test Your Stomach Cancer Knowledge

 

1 in 111 people will be diagnosed with stomach cancer in their lifetime.

Stomach Cancer Diagnosis

 

1 to 3% of stomach cancer is related to inherited cancer syndromes.

In 2014, $1.8 billion was spent on stomach cancer care, but only $11.2 million was given to research.

Fighting Stomach Cancer

 

Stomach cancer is hard to diagnose, so it’s usually caught later.

Finding Stomach Cancer

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Learning for Down Syndrome Awareness Month

Down Syndrome Awareness Month

October is Down Syndrome Awareness Month. Whether you’re pregnant, familiar with Down syndrome, or learning more, get the facts.

NDSS’s webinar series covers many topics in relation to Down syndrome, from health and education to family life.

Embracing Differences

 

Find a Buddy Walk to promote acceptance and inclusion of those with Down syndrome.

Save the Date to Help Down Syndrome

 

Hear stories of Down syndrome firsthand.

Sharing Stories from Down Syndrome

 

Use DS-Connect, the NIH’s Down syndrome registry to contribute and connect to ongoing research.

Fueling the Future

 

Check out Down Right Awesome, the podcast about living with Down syndrome.

Living with Down Syndrome

 

Find ways to advocate for Down syndrome awareness.

Making a Difference for Down Syndrome

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Blood Cancer Awareness Month

Blood Cancer Awareness Month

September is Blood Cancer Awareness Month. Learn more about the types of blood cancer, including Leukemia and Lymphoma, and join the fight!

Get videos, webcasts, drug listings, and free info booklets and get smart about blood cancer.Researching to Prevent

 

Learn more about blood cancer in the news with these handy news releases.

Cancer Right Now

 

If you’re suffering from blood cancer, find the support you need.

Conquering Cancer Together

 

Join a community advancing blood cancer research and driving change.

Teamwork to Beat Cancer

 

Show your support by shopping to fight blood cancer.

Fighting for a Cure

 

Donate to fight blood cancer before September ends and be the change.

Supporting the Cause

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National Cancer Research Month

National Cancer Research Month

May was National Cancer Research Month. Help fight cancer and share your story of what real hope is.

 

Learn more about cancer and the role that cancer research plays in fighting it.

 

Learn more about the Power of 1 and how studies focused on individuals can help.

Individualized Cancer Treatment

 

The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force talks aspirin for preventing colorectal cancer.

Aspirin and Prevention

 

Blood tests to diagnose cancer are at the leading edge of cancer research.

Liquid Diagnosis

 

This article breaks down the importance of basic science in cancer treatment today.

Advances in treating certain kinds of brain cancer are bringing new hope to patients.

Treating Brain Cancer Like Never Before

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Holiday Cookie Eating

Chasing Health: My Ho-Ho-Horrible Holiday Eating & Exercise Habits

I love the holiday season. In the fall and early winter, it seems like there is something special to celebrate nearly every other week. The list goes on and on, and I can’t get enough of it.

As a holiday enthusiast, I appreciate it all, from decorating, baking, and gift-buying to curling up and watching holiday-themed movies, not to mention mouth-watering smells, twinkling lights, and feeling like you’re in a magical snow globe at the first sight of flurries. Seems innocent enough, right?

Well, when I’m not watching National Lampoon’s Christmas Vacation or Home Alone 2 for the 80th time, tearing up when “Do They Know It’s Christmas?” comes on the radio, or obsessing over the placement of ornaments on my tree (perfectionism strikes again), you can probably find me eating all the delicious holiday goodies that come along this time of year.

On top of turkey, ham, and the wide selection of casseroles, you get fudge, cookies, cheeseball, cheese dips, and pretty much any other finger food you can imagine. It’s amazing.

This is the time of year a lot of people take a break from their diets and indulge. It’s also the time of year when the days are short and cold, and your couch and TV seem to call your name the minute you walk through your door. (“Nicole, come catch up on The Walking Dead for the next five hours. I already set out your favorite blanket.”) It’s not a good combination.

But there is hope. Whether you overeat because your stress from the holiday grind has reached Clark Griswold level or (like me) you’ve waited all year for your mom’s chocolate crinkle cookies, you don’t have to put your healthy eating and exercise on hold.

I realize it’s hard to control yourself when you’re surrounded by fabulous snacks in every direction. I go into my family’s celebration with the same strategy every year, and it’s not a healthy one.

On Christmas Eve, I skip breakfast, make ham-and-cheese pinwheels (my decade-and-a-half-long contribution to our family’s party), nibble on the ones that don’t quite make the cut, and consider that my lunch.

An hour or two later when I’m extra hungry from skipping two meals, I help my mom set out all our delicious cookies. I’m an expert in taste-testing.

Cookie pic 2
My mom is in charge of chocolate crinkles (my all-time favorite!), peanut butter, and molasses. I’m in charge of the iced sugar cookies.

Once my aunt’s cheeseball and grandma’s fudge arrive, it’s game over. I’m usually not even hungry by the time my dad’s secret-recipe glazed ham is ready. But I somehow rally like a true holiday-eating champion and get through that meal and an equally delicious meal the next day with the other side of my family.

How does the two-day affair almost always end? With a stomachache and a tinge of regret.

Here is the fabulous spread of delicious goodies. Notice the salad and bowl of oranges. Not everything is unhealthy! Full disclosure, I skip right over both of those.
Here is the fabulous spread of delicious goodies. Notice the salad and bowl of oranges. Not everything is unhealthy! Full disclosure, I skip right over both of those.

Holidays don’t have to end in stomachaches or regret. Here are some tips based on my own worst holiday habits to help you stay on track this holiday season.

  • Don’t cut back on sleep before the big celebration. I like to stay up late any chance I get, whether there’s a special occasion or I’m just watching Netflix by myself. I’m no better than the millions of kids staying up to wait for Santa. But research shows that not getting enough sleep can make you crave the not-so-healthy foods, which isn’t good when the not-so-healthy foods are everywhere.
  • Don’t skip meals to overeat at the party later. Sometimes I think skipping breakfast and lunch gives me a free pass to fill my body with chocolate. It doesn’t. It not only puts me in the wrong mindset, but an Ohio State study suggests that doing this regularly can also affect how your body gains belly fat.
  • Don’t stand around the snack table. This is my favorite place to camp out for the afternoon, but it makes snacking a little too convenient. I probably don’t need a 10th piece of fudge, but who’s counting? (This brings me to my next point.)
  • Keep track of what you’re eating. I started tracking what I eat at the beginning of December as part of a headache diary for my migraines, and my snacking has fallen way off since then. I can only imagine how much this tracking system will help me through the holidays. Any kind of food diary can help you see how healthy or unhealthy your eating habits are.
  • Eat something healthy. Sadly, despite what Buddy the Elf tells us, the main food groups are not “candy, candy canes, candy corns, and syrup.” Mix some fruits and veggies into your holiday meals and snacking options, and eat the unhealthier options in moderation.
  • Keep yourself busy with something other than food. Play games (my brother and I are quite the Catch Phrase duo) or set up a tournament. My cousins and I have hosted all kinds of championship events, everything from table tennis to Guitar Hero to rock-paper-scissors (we must have been feeling either really bored or hyper-competitive that year). The more physically active and farther from the food, the better.
  • Keep up your exercise routine (or something close to it). If you fall off, don’t feel discouraged (and don’t eat more cookies to console yourself). Just start exercising again. It’s easy to make excuses, but if you’re like me, you’ll feel better physically and mentally if you don’t ditch the physical activity.

I hope to follow at least some of these tips this holiday season and hope you do, too. I’ve already tried pretending celery is chocolate. It didn’t go so well, but I have high hopes for these other more reasonable tips.

Happy holidays!

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