Tag Archives: quit smoking

Prostate Health Month

Prostate Health Month

September is Prostate Health Month, and last week was Prostate Cancer Awareness Week. Make sure you get your annual screening before it’s too late.

Your Yearly Preventive Care and Physical

 

Ladies, you’re often the ones who get men to go to the doctor for screenings. When was the last time the men in your life got checked?

Protect the Men in Your Life

 

Prostate cancer kills approximately 30,000 men in the U.S. each year. Know your risk.

Prostate Cancer Death Toll

 

1 in 7 men will be diagnosed with prostate cancer in their lifetime, and African-American men are 1.57 times more likely to develop it. Early detection can help.

At Higher Risk

 

Did you know that BPH (Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia) affects more than half of men over age 60?

BPH and You

 

Limit your risk of prostate cancer by not smoking and by getting regular screenings from your primary care provider (PCP).

Reduce Your Risk

 

Learn more about prostate cancer treatments, or find a walk and give back.

Prostate Cancer Facts

 

National High Blood Pressure Education Month

National High Blood Pressure Education Month

It’s National High Blood Pressure Education Month. High blood pressure increases your stroke risk, and every 40 seconds, an American has a stroke. Learn more.

High Blood Pressure's Risk

 

The Dangers of Strokes for Women

Do you understand your blood pressure? Learn more now.

Understanding Blood Pressure

 

High Blood Pressure's Risk

Break down your risk of high blood pressure to understand it better.

Breaking Down Why Your Blood Pressure’s High

 

Your Age and Strokes

Learn to eat right and exercise to fight high blood pressure.

Learn to Eat Right and Exercise for Your Heart

 

 High Blood Pressure's Risk

Tobacco takes a toll on your blood pressure. Learn more and get help quitting.

Tobacco and Your Heart

 

Learn About High Blood Pressure

This handy guide helps break down the info around your blood pressure meds.

Your Meds and Your Heart

 

High Blood Pressure's Risk

We’ve got quick tips to help you cut back on salt for your blood pressure without losing flavor:

Cutting Back on Salt for Your Heart

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Adventure for Men's Health!

Men’s Health Week

June is Men’s Health Month, and this week was Men’s Health Week!

Show your support for Men’s Health Month by wearing blue! And learn more about making your health a priority.

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Eating healthy is important for everyone, but studies show men worry about their diet less than women. Make sure you know your nutritional needs.

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Quitting smoking, getting screened, and using sunscreen are just some of the ways men can protect themselves from cancer. Don’t become one of the 300,0000 men in the U.S. that dies from cancer each year.

Portrait of lovely young couple having fun at the beach

 

What’s the #1 thing you can do to take care of yourself? Schedule your annual exam today!

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Men are more likely to drink too much and be dependent on alcohol, which increases health risks. Have you thought about how it could affect your future?

Closeup image of two guys toasting their beer bottles at a music festival

 

High blood pressure, especially in men, is a huge risk. What is it and what can you do about it?

A handsome young man sitting out in nature with his girlfriend

 

Get active! One of the best things you can do to stay healthy at any age is to stay active. Pick an activity you love and stick with it!

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Healthy Hearts for American Heart Month

American Heart Month 2015

February is American Heart Month, so we gave you info to protect your heart each day.

Get your blood pressure checked so you know your risk.

Taking Your Blood Pressure

 

Visit your doctor regularly and know your cholesterol to protect your heart.

Learning About Cholesterol

 

Eating a healthy diet helps protect you from all kinds of health problems, including your heart health. Find recipes.

Heart Healthy Dieting

 

Smoking affects not just your lungs, but also your heart. Quit before it’s too late.

Cancer and Smoking

 

Heart disease is the #1 killer of women. Find info and help tailored to you and Go Red.

Women and Their Hearts

 

Getting healthy through diet, exercise, quitting, and managing your stress is the best way to protect your heart. The American Heart Association can help.

Who do you know that’s been touched by heart disease? Does it run in your family? Help fight the disease.

Give to Protect Hearts

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National Cancer Prevention Month

National Cancer Prevention Month

February is National Cancer Prevention Month, so we gave you more cancer info each day this week.

1,658,370 new cancer cases will be diagnosed in 2015, and 589,430 will die from cancer. Get involved in fighting back.

Know the warning signs and symptoms of cancer. Early detection could save your life.

Cancer Signs and Symptoms

 

You can take steps to prevent cancer. Maintain a healthy body weight, eat right, and be active.

Prevention Through Healthy Choices

 

Cancer deaths have declined 20% since 1991, saving 1.3 million lives. Your involvement helps.

Cancer Research

 

30% of all cancer deaths can be attributed to smoking, the leading cause of preventable death worldwide. We can help members quit.

Cancer and Smoking

 

1 in 235 children will get cancer before age 20. Learn more about protecting your kids.

Preventing Cancer in Children

 

In 2009, cancer cost the U.S. $216.6 billion dollars. Finding a cure helps us all save. Find ways to help now.

Cancer Costs

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Time Is Up: Make Healthy Resolutions

Making Healthy Resolutions

It’s that time again to start picking out your New Years Resolutions. If you always go too big and forget about them within the month, each day this week we gave you some little changes and healthy resolutions you can stick to.

The hardest one is to quit smoking. It’s hard to do, but it’s standing in the way of your healthy life. We can help members connect to resources and support with our Quit For Life program.

Quit Smoking Resolution

 

Today’s resolution is to get more sleep. Sleep is when your body and mind heals and prepares. Find more info about sleep on our Pinterest.

Getting Enough Sleep

 

Stress has been linked to big health problems, like heart disease, diabetes, and depression. Find info on ways to relieve some of your stress on our Pinterest board.

Managing Stress in the New Year

 

Resolve to get yearly checkups with your main doctor and dentist. It helps catch problems early and keeps you up-to-date on things like shots.

Regular Checkups for Your Health

 

Floss your teeth! It sounds simple, but only half of Americans do it. Yet smiles are the first feature we notice. Take the time on your teeth, and people will notice.

Flossing for Your Future

 

Dieting sounds like a lot, so instead, focus on only eating healthy portions this New Year and watch your health improve!

Portions

 

Make a routine and stick to it. A routine in the morning can help you get up to workout, and one at night can help you go to sleep.

Building a Healthy Routine

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Quit Smoking for Your Lungs

Take Charge to Quit for Life

My grandfather died before I was even 2 years old. I have one hazy memory of him. I was snacking on raisins sitting on a dark windowsill in his room while he lay in bed talking to my mom. He was already dying. I didn’t know that yet though. Eventually, my mom picked me up onto his bed to talk to him too. I think I offered to share my raisins.

My grandfather was in the insurance business. He’d been a janitor at the local grade school when the cancer took over.

I have many more memories of my grandmother, but still not enough. I remember we used to pick her up and take her shopping, and she always liked to buy me little presents. I always loved hearing her call my mother by her real name, sometimes in that same tone that my mother used on me. She died when I was just 4.

She worked in the cafeteria at my mom’s grade school once my mother and her 4 siblings were all in school. After that, she helped clean their priests’ homes and helped out at their church through various committees.

My grandfather died of colon cancer. He had gotten cancer once before, in 1988, and it spread from there. In 1990, the symptoms returned, and it spread to his spine. It was too late for radiation to save him. Once it was in his brain, they told him he had 6 months to live. He was dead within that time. My mother and her siblings watched him die that year, and my mother found him the day he died.

He was only 58 years old. That is just 3 years older than my father is right now.

My grandmother had a family history of heart problems, and had a heart attack the year my parents were married in 1987. She had open-heart surgery, a triple-bypass. They grafted veins from her leg into her heart. My mother describes her scars in the hospital as very scary.

In November 1993, she walked to church on an overly cold morning, much like this November. At Sunday mass that day, she had another heart attack. They stopped the service, did CPR, and waited for the paramedics.

It was a massive heart attack, and they never got her back. She was only 61 years old.

Both of them died from health issues related to tobacco. My grandfather smoked cigarettes and a pipe for more than 40 years. He didn’t stop smoking either time he found out he had cancer. It made him dizzy as the end neared. And when he asked for cigarettes on his deathbed, my mother hated to give them to him. My grandma lived in secondhand smoke their entire marriage, for 36 years.

Both colon cancer, among many other kinds of cancer, and heart problems have been directly tied to cigarette smoke.

My mother was raised in smoke. Everybody did it back then. She didn’t really dislike it until she moved out, and then her parents died.

“I just wish that there never was such a thing as smoking. That there was no vice like that, because so many people are addicted, and it took such a toll on their health. And I really resent the fact that I’ve grown up most of my life without my parents,” my mother said.

“I was 28 when my dad died and 31 when my mom died. I remember feeling like, even though I was an adult, like an orphan. I’m only in my 20’s, why would I lose both my parents within 2 and a half years?”

“I do think that smoking definitely had something to do with it. It had to have caused some of the illness for both of them,” she said.

Tobacco use is the #1 cause of preventable disease and death across the world. And according to the American Lung Association, its effects claim 393,000 American lives each year.

More than 20 million people have died from smoking and secondhand smoke in the past 50 years, and most of you probably have a story of loved ones lost, like my family’s.

2014 marked 50 years of progress. 50 years since the Surgeon General came out against smoking. And we’ve done a lot. According to new reports from the Surgeon General, half as many American adults smoke. And Yale University research estimates that 8 million people’s lives have been saved because of it.

But 42 million American adults and more than 3.5 million middle and high school students still smoke. Which is why it’s time for you to take a stand for yourself and your family.

My mom has always pushed that my brother and I never pick up smoking. We have been lucky, but not everyone learns the legacy tobacco has had on their family.

Talk to your kids. Make sure that they know not only the dangers, but also that this can affect them. It is not some far-off stat that could never happen to them. Share your stories and the stories of those who can’t.

Make a plan to quit. Get ready, and take action. Don’t put off your health and your future. Start a new family legacy of quitting tobacco.

Find resources to help you quit at the American Cancer Association.

Health Alliance members can use our Quit For Life stop smoking program, which had helped more than 2 million people over the past 30 years. For more information, visit QuitNow.net or call 1-866-QUIT-4-LIFE (1-866-784-8454).

Your healthy change starts taking effect right now. Don’t put it off.

How Long After Quitting Smoking Infographic

*All statistics are from the American Lung Association and the American Cancer Association. My mother’s name is Mary Kay Shields, and I thank her for giving me permission to share our family’s story. I cannot imagine having to go the rest of my life without her or my father.

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