Tag Archives: protection

Internet Safety and Privacy

Internet Safety

In honor of Safer Internet Day earlier this month, we helped you and your family practice internet safety all week.

Make sure you’re not accidentally giving out personal information you wouldn’t want on the internet, like your phone number or address, to any individuals or companies you don’t know or have never heard of.

Never share your password with anyone. If you do have to share one, like your wifi password, use one that’s not tied to any important accounts. A secure password manager can help you if you struggle to keep track of your passwords.

Safely Managing Your Passwords

 

When creating screen names, don’t include any important personal information, like your last name or birthdate, and help your children set up any accounts they have to protect their info.

Safely Setting Up Accounts Online

 

Protecting your kids in the age of technology can be tricky. Make sure you know how to enable parental controls across devices.

Protecting Your Kids Online

 

You don’t have to be a tech wizard to practice better privacy safety online. Securing your browser, using anti-virus software, keeping programs up to date, and paying attention to settings on your accounts is an easy way to get started with digital security.

Learn to Protect Yourself Online

 

For many of us, social media is a way to share our lives with loved ones. But sharing personal details, your location, or even family photos can be risky. Adjust your social media privacy settings to protect your info.

Social Media Privacy Settings

 

Be smart shopping online. If a website looks old and outdated or if you can’t find any reviews or press coverage for their company in a quick search, don’t enter your credit card info into their site. Services like PayPal can also protect your money and info.

Online Shopping Safety

Coming Together for Breast Cancer Awareness Month

Breast Cancer Awareness Month

October is Breast Cancer Awareness Month. Protect yourself now. How can you reduce your risk of breast cancer? Learn more.

Find out what you should be doing to detect breast cancer early.

Staying Ahead of Breast Cancer

 

Create your early detection plan and make sure you’re protected from breast cancer.

Preventing Cancer Now

 

Nervous about your mammogram? What you should know:

7 Things to Know About Getting a Mammogram

 

Use Beyond the Shock, a comprehensive guide to breast cancer, if you or a loved one is diagnosed.

Moving Forward After Breast Cancer

 

Stories of hope offer support to those who have or care for someone with breast cancer.

Hope for Moving On

 

How can you support the breast cancer cause? Get started today.

Get Involved to Stop Breast Cancer

Save

Save

Save

Save

Fraud Awareness with the Right Payment

Fraud Awareness for National Fraud Awareness Week

Last week was National Fraud Awareness Week, and there’s no better time to think about protecting yourself. These fraud awareness tips can help.

If you’re cold-called and asked for an immediate decision to buy something, beware. A legitimate company lets you have time to choose.

Telemarketers and Fraud

 

Check the Better Business Bureau to see if a company is listed and its ratings and reviews.

Shop Smart with Recommendations

 

Search for the business online. Legitimate businesses usually have websites and a web presence. Scammers are more likely to change their online name regularly to avoid bad reviews.

Search for Businesses

 

Protect yourself online with virus protection software and by creating strong passwords.

Online Security to Prevent Fraud

 

Don’t open suspicious emails from people you don’t know, and don’t download files from people or sites you don’t trust.

Your Email Safety

 

Pay smart. Credit cards have fraud protection built in, but wiring money, cash, or reloadable cards make it impossible to get your money back.

Don’t always trust free trials, which can sign you up for products you have to cancel to get out of. And sign up for scam alerts from the FTC.

Be Smart About Free Trials

Your Bond as a Mother

Vantage Point: Mother Knows Best

“Mother knows best” is a phrase I heard all the time growing up. As a young child, I thought of Mom as the person you would run to after getting hurt to get hugs and kisses. Mom was the one who gave me good night kisses and woke me up with a gentle touch on my forehead.

I never thought how all of these actions benefited me in the future. Of course, being a kid means you are always correct, and Mom has no idea what she is talking about.

As a child, I would start jumping back and forth on furniture, and I would hear my mother say, “Stop jumping. You are going to get hurt.” As a teenager, I would arrive home past my curfew to my mom awake with a worried look on her face. She proceeded to tell me how one day I would understand, when I had my own kids, and I’d have the same worried feeling when I didn’t know where they were.

That day has arrived. I now have a child of my own, and I understand where my mother was coming from 100%. The motherly instinct has kicked in, and I want to keep my child safe all the time. I want to know what my child is doing all the time. I want my child to think of me when he gets hurts. I want to kiss my child good night and wake him up with a gentle touch.

Actions I thought nothing of, I now know were life lessons only a mother can instill in her children. Now, when my child won’t listen to me, I will sound just like my mother: “You’re going to get hurt,” and “One day, you will understand how I feel.”

May is the month when everyone recognizes their mother. We go out and buy her flowers, get the perfect card, take her out for lunch, and pamper her for the day. But why wait for a certain day to pamper our mothers? We have 365 days to let them know how much we appreciate all of the advice and guidance we received and still do receive.

Nowadays, Mom and I love to sit down and laugh at the silly things I did as a kid, as well as the trouble she got into as kid. After all of that, my mom still sits back and says, “Mother knows best.”

Jessica Arroyo, born and raised in Wenatchee Valley, is a Medicare community liaison for Health Alliance, serving Chelan, Douglas, Grant, and Okanogan counties in Washington. During her time off, she enjoys spending time with her husband and infant son.

Mother Knows Best

Long View: Mother Knows Best

Picture it, jumping back and forth on furniture, hearing a mother say, “Stop jumping. You are going to get hurt.” Or hearing a mother say, “Finish your vegetables, and drink your milk.”

Or as a teenager, arriving home past curfew, while Mom waits awake with a worried look on her face. And then she says, “One day you will understand, when you have your own kids. You will feel worried when you don’t know where they are.”

Now that I am a mother, I know exactly what she meant.

“Mother knows best,” is a phrase I think we all heard while growing up. And isn’t that the truth at any age?

Mothers are often who we turn to for big and small things going on in our lives; they’re the ones we celebrate with and mourn with. They share stories of the past to help us learn more about the future. And when I go to my mom’s, or when I would visit my grandmother, I don’t know what it is, but I can sleep there better than anywhere else. I guess it is because it’s where I feel safe and loved for all that I am, no matter what. That’s my experience at least.

My mom has become one of my best friends in my adult life, someone who will always advocate for me, lift me up, and be there in happiness and tears. And I do the same for her.

Now, I have an 18-year-old daughter, and we have developed a similar relationship. Just like they say, time sure does fly, but motherhood has been one of the most rewarding parts of my life. I always want my daughter to feel safe, loved, and supported. I hope pain is limited in her life, but I always want her to know I will be there for her, no matter what the age, if she needs me.

She graduates from high school this month, and that will be an emotional day. When she turned 18 in February this year, she said, “Well, it is my last birthday.” I didn’t quite understand why she was phrasing it that way.

In her mind, it was the reality of becoming an adult, and she felt like that was the last time someone would focus on her special day because she was an “adult” now. Not sure why as adults we think we are less important to focus on, but I will celebrate her and my mother anytime.

May is the month when people recognize and celebrate their mother. Everyone does things a little differently. Maybe they go out and buy flowers, get the perfect card, go out for lunch, and pamper them for the day. Mothers deserve celebrating, and maybe you have something special planned too.

Outside of this special, dedicated time in May, it is also important to appreciate and spend time with them throughout the year to let them know how much we appreciate all of the advice and guidance we receive and to continue to learn more of those “mother knows best” moments!

Terra Mullins leads the community outreach team at Health Alliance. She is a wife, a mother, and has two really cute Mal-Shi pups! She loves nature and learning new things.

Figuring Out Caregiving Protections

Long View: Advocating for Our Elders

When I was a youngster, I remember having a hard time paying attention to anything for very long. Thankfully, that’s all behind me now, but sometimes these childhood lapses made it appear like I was misbehaving or being disobedient. That was not the case of course.

For instance, I had my own ideas of when I should be doing chores, and it didn’t always match what my parents had in mind. I’m sure I presented my folks with quite a challenge. Looking back, I realize they were always right, and they had insights I couldn’t have known as a child.

It’s interesting to compare this childhood relationship with the relationships of adult caregivers and their parents or older family members. Being supportive and resourceful and providing suggestions are all part of the deal, but sometimes it’s hard to remember these are relationships between adults and not between parents and children. Even the best suggestion isn’t going to be received well if it doesn’t coincide with the older person’s wants and needs. Of course there will be disagreements, but that’s to be expected.

At Health Alliance Medicare, we have many members who have signed an appointment of representative form, which allows a child or other caregiver to speak on their behalf with their health insurance. We know that acting for a loved one can be a challenging position to be in, but we must have this formal legal agreement before our customer service reps can share the member’s claims information and other confidential information.

Another kind of protection is the Long-Term Care Ombudsman program, which works to protect, defend, and advocate for residents of long-term care facilities. One of its duties is to investigate concerns brought forward from anyone on behalf of the resident.

Amanda Hyde is the planning & grants manager at the East Central Illinois Area Agency on Aging, the sponsor that houses this program. She said, “The Ombudsman Program at ECIAAA is focused on advocating for resident rights. These rights include being fully informed on all aspects, including cost and even changes in rooms or roommates. Residents have the right to complain, participate in one’s own care, the right to confidentiality, the right to dignity, respect, and freedom, including the right to self-determination, and even making what others may deem as bad choices.”

There are many levels of caregiving, and I know it can be stressful. Differences of opinions are bound to happen. Although our loved ones aren’t always going to agree with us, I am sure it’s comforting for them to know that our care and support isn’t based on their obedience.

Patrick Harness is a community liaison with a long history of experience in health insurance. If you ask him to pick a color, he always chooses orange, and he is known for his inability to parallel park.

Liver Awareness Month

Liver Awareness Month

It’s Liver Awareness Month, and the American Liver Foundation and Bayer have partnered to raise liver cancer awareness.

Raising Liver Cancer Awareness

 

The liver is one of the most important organs in your body, and 30 million people in America have a form of liver disease.

Are you at risk for liver cancer?

Are You at Risk for Liver Cancer?

 

Learn more about liver cancer to make sure you’re protected.

Learn About your Liver

 

There are more than 100 different types of liver disease, and they’re not primarily from drug and alcohol abuse.

Types of Liver Disease

 

It’s possible to have liver disease and have no idea. About 75% of people with hepatitis B and C don’t know they have it.

Learn About Liver Diseases

 

These 13 tips can help you protect your liver.

Exercise for Your Liver

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save