Tag Archives: processed

Ditch the Unhealthy Snack Food

National Snack Food Month

It’s National Snack Food Month, and we want to help you snack smart and ditch processed snacks with healthy snack food recipes.

First up, skip the snack aisle and make Clean and Fudgy Dark Chocolate Frosted Brownies.

Image and Recipe via Amy’s Healthy Baking


If you’re a dipper, you have options with these 29 Healthy Hummus Recipes.

29 Healthy Hummus Recipes
Image and Recipe via Dr. Axe


Make Healthy Chocolate Pudding Pops that your kids will love after school.

Healthy Chocolate Pudding Pops
Image and Recipe via Make the Best of Everything


Skip the grocery store granola bars with these homemade Strawberry Oat Bars.

Image and Recipe via My Fussy Eater


Ditch the store-bought bags for this Healthy Trail Mix that’s easy and tasty.

Healthy Trail Mix
Image and Recipe via Mom Spotted


You’ll feel like you’re eating candy with Chocolate Banana Frozen Yogurt Bark.

Chocolate Banana Frozen Yogurt Bark
Image and Recipe via My Fussy Eater


Skip cookies and eat No-Bake Loaded Oatmeal Cookie Energy Bites on the go.

No Bake Loaded Oatmeal Cookie Energy Bites
Image and Recipe via Cotter Crunch



Grocery Shopping Fresh

Grocery Shopping Like a Pro

Even after you’ve gotten ready to head to the store, grocery shopping on a budget for healthy meals can be hard. But there are some things you can do to make it easier.

Stock Your Pantry

Keeping your kitchen stocked with certain key things can make cooking easy. This list has some items that are perfect for this. And this article has some healthy foods perfect for your pantry that only cost about $2.

Add one item that won’t go bad, like a spice, grain, beans, or frozen veggies to your cart each shopping trip to help you build your pantry without dropping a lot of money at once. (These are also good things to buy in bulk when they’re on sale if you have space to store them.)

Having this stocked pantry will help you throw together meals fast, help you save on packaged or premade meals you might’ve grabbed in a hurry, and make shopping easier.

Choosing Your Store

Choosing where you shop can also help you save. Besides the grocery store, some great places to find good deals are:

  • Ethnic markets
  • Dollar stores
  • Retail supercenters
  • Wholesale clubs
  • Farmers markets

At the Store

Once you’re at the store, you should try to shop the outer edge of it as much as possible. The outer edge usually has the fresh produce, like fruits and veggies, meat, dairy, bread, and frozen food. It’s typically the inner aisles that are full of boxed and processed foods.

Fruits & Veggies

It’s recommended that you eat 5 servings of veggies a day, so it’s important to really use that part of the store. With that in mind, fruits and veggies, fresh or frozen, should take up about a third of your cart on each shopping trip.

  • Shop in season 

At the farmers market, you have to buy what’s in season, but at the grocery store, there are lots of choices. But when you buy what’s in season, you can save a lot, and your food will be the tastiest and freshest it can be. This list can help you find what’s in season when.

  • Buy bags at the right time

With certain go-to things your family will always use, like apples, oranges, potatoes, and onions, buying them in the big bags when they’re in season can help you save even more.

  • Stock up on canned and frozen fruits and veggies

Canned and frozen fruits and veggies are picked while they’re in season and tasting best, and they’re good for you, too. So instead of buying fresh peas when they’re not in season, stock up on frozen ones to save and get the best flavor. Plus, they last much longer.

Look for frozen veggies without added sauces or butter. Choose canned fruit in 100% fruit juice and veggies with “low-sodium” or “no salt added.”

Canned veggies and broths are perfect for easy soups and stews, and canned fruit makes great fruit salad and snacks for the kids.

Packaged Goods

Avoid a lot of the packaged and processed foods in the center of the store. Cookies, candy, chips, crackers, and soda are all high in things you don’t want, like sugar, salt, and bad fats, and low in things like protein and nutrients. They’re also expensive.

  • Look for whole grains

Be careful you don’t get fooled by things that just call out wheat. Instead, look for whole grains and whole-grain breads.

  • Find high-protein foods besides meat

Yogurt and cheeses are great sources of protein, as are beans and other legumes, which you can find dried or canned.

  • Be smart about cereal

Cereals are one of the top foods for hidden sugar. Look for ones with little or no sugar. You can always add honey to flavor it in the bowl. Also look for cereals high in fiber to start your day right.

  • Try new things in the bulk aisle

If you want to try a new grain, nut, or dried fruit, the bulk aisle with bins is a great way to taste test. Scoop out a small bag for your family to taste before buying bigger servings.

Shopping Tips

Make the most of your trip by paying attention to how your store organizes things, their price tags, and food labels.

  • Don’t shop at eye level

Stores oftentimes stock the most expensive things right where they’ll catch your eye. Looking at the upper and lower shelves can help you find the best deal.

  • Grab from the back

Stores also stock from the back, putting newer things behind the older ones. Grabbing from the back gets you fresher food with better expiration dates, so your food will be good for longer.

  • Look for store brands

Many stores have their own brands of items, and in most cases, you’ll get the exact same or very similar thing at a much better price.

  • Read the label

Reading the nutrition label can tell you a lot about what’s in a food, if it’s good for you, and help you choose between brands.

  • Pay attention to serving sizes

Some things might seem good for you until you check the serving size. Sometimes the serving size is much smaller than what you’d actually eat in a sitting, which makes the numbers on the label look better.

  • Learn how to read unit price on the price tag

Unit price tells you how much something costs per pound, ounce, quart, or other unit of measure. It can tell you which brands are the most affordable. This guide can help you read or calculate unit price.

  • Have a calculator handy

Whether it’s on your phone or you bring a small calculator along to the store, having one on hand can make it easy to compare labels and costs.

Up Next:

Learn how to read and make sense of nutrition labels to get the most out of your food.

Clean Eating Done Right

5 Steps to Clean Eating

What Is Clean Eating?

There’s a new buzz word being thrown around in the world of nutrition, clean eating. It’s a pretty simple concept: eat foods that aren’t processed and are as direct from nature as possible. They’re whole and free of additives, colorings, flavorings, sweeteners, and hormones.

Evidence shows that the closer to nature you eat, the fewer calories it will take for you to feel full. Processed foods are low in fiber and water, have few nutrients for the amount of calories and added flavors from salt, sugar, and chemicals.

Clean foods are the exact opposite, with lots of fiber, water, many nutrients to the amount of calories and no added flavors. This combination tells your brain that you are satisfied.

For example, if you were eating raw almonds as a snack, you are likely to eat fewer than if you were diving into a bag of honey roasted almonds. The sugary coating on the almonds makes the snack harder to resist.

Give clean eating a try for yourself. It’s easier than you think. Instead of an apple pastry, applesauce, or apple juice, go to the source and eat an apple.

Clean Up

  • Toss heavily processed food, full of things like corn syrup, oil, and salt, and soda.
  • Shop the outskirts of the grocery store, which is where the freshest foods are.
  • Read labels for the fewest and simplest ingredients. The longer the list, the more room for the additions of chemicals, sugar, salt, and bad oils.
  • Cook more meals at home. Restaurants rely heavily on processed foods to make things quickly and uniformly.
  • Train your tongue. If you are used to salt, sugar, and fat, you’ll need some time to appreciate the more subtle flavors of natural foods.