Tag Archives: potatoes

Healthy Potato Recipes

Healthy Potato Recipes

This week, we’re featuring healthy potato recipes that you can use this holiday season without hurting your healthy diet.

First up are The Creamiest Vegan Mashed Potatoes, perfect for your Thanksgiving.

The Creamiest Vegan Mashed Potatoes
Image and Recipe via My California Roots

 

Make this easy Seasonal Leek and Potato Pan Roast for a beautiful side dish.

This Skinny Stuffed Baked Potato Soup will be a hit at holiday potlucks.

Skinny Stuffed Baked Potato Soup
Image and Recipe via Jeanette’s Healthy Living

 

This Vegan Avocado Potato Salad is a light and easy side for work events.

Skip the unhealthy fried snacks with Simple Baked Potato Chips.

This Vegan Breakfast Skillet is veggie-packed and will satisfy your potato craving.

Video and Recipe via Heather Christo

 

Whip up this refreshing Cilantro Lime Potato Salad for a hearty side.

Cilantro Lime Potato Salad
Image and Recipe via Julia’s Album
Camping Meals & Campfire Delights

Healthy Camping Meals

To go along with our National Camping Month safety tips, we also featured some healthy camping meals you can make on the campfire.

First up were easy Breakfast Burritos that you can just throw in the fire.

Lumberjack Breakfast combines your favorite breakfast fixings in one packet.

Lumberjack Breakfast
Image and Recipe via Echoes of Laughter

 

These Campfire Tex Mex White Bean and Chicken Foil Packets are a breeze to make.

This BBQ Party Pack is the perfect side dish or vegetarian meal while camping.

Hobo Dinners are foil packets of meat, potatoes, and veggies perfect for camping.

Image and Recipe via Brittany’s Pantry

 

Foil Wrapped Salmon with Herbs and Lemon is great made with fresh fish.

Foil Wrapped Salmon with Herbs and Lemon
Image via Roadtrippers

 

Reheat this Whole Wheat Pasta with Goat Cheese & Tomatoes in Foil over the fire.

Whole Wheat Pasta with Goat Cheese & Tomatoes in Foil
Images and Recipes via Cookin’ Canuck
Cooking Spring Side Dishes with Fresh Veggies

Healthy Spring Side Dishes

This week, we featured spring side dishes that make use of some of your favorite fresh spring veggies.

First up is a Spring Pea and Radish Salad worth shelling fresh peas for.

Spring Pea and Radish Salad
Image and Recipe via Running with Tweezers

 

These bright Roasted Potatoes and Lemon with Dill will satisfy your potato craving.

Roasted Potatoes and Lemon with Dill
Image and Recipe via Real Simple

 

Keep some Pickled Lavender Carrots on hand for a twist on your sandwich.

Pickled Lavendar Carrots
Image and Recipe via Rattlebridge Farm

 

Asparagus with Citrus Sauce is light and refreshing with grilled chicken or fish.

Asparagus with Citrus Sauce
Image and Recipe via Good Housekeeping

 

Throw together this Carrot, Avocado, and Orange Salad for your next BBQ.

Carrot, Avocado, and Orange Salad
Image and Recipe via Epicurious

 

Spring Orzo Pasta Salad with Asparagus and Artichokes will be a tasty and vibrant addition to your spring meals.

Spring Orzo Pasta Salad with Asparagus and Artichokes
Image and Recipe via Food for My Family

 

This Crunchy Sprout and Daikon Salad with Mint is a great coleslaw replacement.

Crunchy Sprout and Daikon Salad with Mint
Image and Recipe via Whole Living
Safe, Fresh Food Storage

Keeping Things Fresh

Storing your fresh food correctly is important. It protects you from contamination that can make you sick, and it helps you get the most out of your groceries. If you store your fruits and veggies in the wrong way, they can go bad more quickly, before you have the chance to use them. These tips can help.

Tip #1

Keep them cold. Most importantly, make sure your fridge is at the right temperature, 40°F or below, and the freezer should be 0°F or below.

Foods that need refrigerated should be put in the fridge as soon as you get home. Never allow food that should be refrigerated, including leftovers and takeout, to sit out for more than 2 hours.

As soon as you get home from the store, freeze any meats that you aren’t going to cook in the next 2 days.

Tip #2

Some things always need to be refrigerated. All produce that is pre-cut or peeled needs stored in the fridge.

Eggs, meat, chicken, and seafood need to be refrigerated.

Tip #3

Some fruits and veggies shouldn’t be refrigerated. Tomatoes get mushy and lose their flavor; bananas will turn black, and the starch in potatoes turns to sugar when kept in the fridge.

And while potatoes and onions do best in a cool, dry place, don’t keep them under the sink where leaking sinks can ruin them. And never store any food near cleaners because they can poison you.

Tip #4

Some fruits should be ripened on the counter and then refrigerated. Avocados, kiwis, and fruits with a pit, like peaches and plums, take a few days on the counter to ripen and then can be kept in the fridge.

Tip #5

The containers some produce comes in are good ways to store them. When you bring home berries, make sure you go through them and remove all spoiled ones so they don’t spread mold to the other berries. Their containers also allow for air to get to them.

Things like grapes and onions also come in bags that let air get to them.

Salad mixes also often come in good storage containers. It can be a good idea to put a paper towel between the lid and greens to prevent condensation.

Always make sure your meat is wrapped well, both for the best quality and to protect other food.

Tip #6

Some things shouldn’t be stored together. Never store anything you eat raw, like fruits and veggies, near anything that must be cooked to be safe to eat, like raw meat, chicken, or seafood.

And even though potatoes and onions both do well in cool, dry environments, you shouldn’t store them right next to each other. That goes for most foods and onions because other foods can take on the onion flavor. (But make sure to store green onions in your fridge in the crisper drawer.)

If you buy root vegetables with their tops still on, like radishes, turnips, beets, and carrots, cut the greens off and store them separately. Never used the tops before? Don’t worry, we can help!

Tip #7

Use water to keep some things fresh for longer. Asparagus and fresh herbs, like basil, cilantro, parsley, and mint, stay fresh for longer when you store them with the ends in a jar or cup of water.

Still not sure how to handle a certain food? This handy guide can help:

How to Store Your Groceries
Image via Buzzfeed

 

Up Next:

Wondering how long your food is actually good for? We can help make sense of all those dates!

And make sure you keep your food bacteria-free by washing your produce and practicing safe food prep.

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Cleaning Produce at Home

Cleaning Before Eating

Cleaning produce carefully before eating it is important for lots of reasons. Some people blame all foodborne illnesses on meat, but in recent years, fruits and veggies, like spinach, tomatoes, and lettuce, have played a role in many illnesses.

Your fresh fruits and veggies can get contaminated by animals or harmful substances in the soil or water during farming. And after farming, they pass through many people’s hands, raising that risk even more.

Easy Steps for Cleaning Produce

  1. Start by washing your hands with soap and warm water.
  2. Always wash and cut off bruised or damaged parts of fruits and veggies before eating or preparing them.
  3.  Always wash fruits and veggies before you peel them, so dirt and bacteria don’t go from your hands or knife onto the parts of the fruits or veggies you eat.
  4. Use a clean vegetable brush to scrub firm produce, like melons, squash, and cucumber.
  5. Gently rub fruits and veggies under cold, running water. You don’t need to use soap or cleaners.
  6. Dry them with a clean cloth or paper towels to help get rid of any other bacteria.

Tips for Cleaning Produce

Fruits with Stems

Fruits like apples and pears can hold bacteria around the stem, so it’s always a good idea to wash them off right before eating them. And it never hurts to cut off the core’s outer ends before eating.

Fruits with Rinds

Even though you don’t eat the peel of things like oranges and grapefruits, make sure you rinse them well before peeling them. You can always scrub bumpy foods, like avocados, to kill bacteria. If you’re going to use zest in a recipe, cleaning these kinds of fruits is really important.

Berries

Rinse berries gently. Using a colander can make it easier to drain them of extra water.

Lettuce and Cabbage

Throw out the outer leaves of all heads of leafy greens.

Broccoli and Cauliflower

These have lots of spaces for bacteria to hide. Soak these for a few minutes if rinsing them can’t get every spot.

Celery

Things that come in a bunch, like celery, should be pulled apart before washing, so you can get each piece clean.

Root Veggies

Veggies like potatoes and carrots need scrubbed well to get all of the dirt and bacteria off, even if you’re going to peel them after.

Mushrooms

Some mushrooms can absorb water, so it’s important to not let them soak. Rinse them gently or wipe them off thoroughly with a damp cloth or paper towel.

Organic Produce

Still needs washed! And while farmers markets are a great place to get local, healthy produce, you should still wash it all carefully!

Up Next:

Your fruits and veggies can also get contaminated after you’ve bought them. Learn more about storing your food to prevent this. And make sure your food prep is safe.

Dividing Your Plate

Dividing Your Plate Into Sections

Dividing your plate into sections to make sure you choose healthy foods and use proper portions is the key to managing your diabetes, cholesterol, high blood pressure, and your diet.

Dividing Your Plate

According to the American Diabetes Association, a good way to plan your meals is by dividing your plate into 3 sections.

Use an imaginary line and cut your plate in half. Divide one of the halves into two to create the three different zones.

For Breakfast

  • The large section is for fruit, fresh if possible.
  • Whole grain cereals or whole grain toast go into one of the smaller sections.
  •  Eggs, Greek yogurt, or lean breakfast meats go into the other small section.

For Lunch and Dinner

  • The large section is for non-starchy vegetables like carrots, spinach, broccoli, and green beans.
  • Starchy foods such as whole-grain bread, rice, or potatoes go into one of the smaller sections.
  •  Lean meat or meat substitutes go into the other small section.

Keeping portions in mind when managing your diet can have a significant effect on your health.