Tag Archives: pickles

Healthy Burger Recipes

Healthy Burger Recipes

This week in food, we had all kinds of healthy burger recipes for you to start grilling!

First up for Meatless Monday was a Portobello Mushroom Burger with Avocado Chimichurri for a burger that tastes meaty without the meat.

Portobello Mushroom Burger with Avocado Chimichurri and Capsule Kitchen Challenge

 

Try Tortilla Crusted Chipotle Salmon Sliders for a delicious and one-of-a-kind appetizer.

Tortilla Crusted Chipotle Salmon Sliders
Image and Recipe via How Sweet Eats

 

This Herbed Turkey Burger with Goat Cheese and Cranberry Sauce is pretty much Thanksgiving on a bun.

Herbed Turkey Burgers with Goat Cheese and Cranberry Sauce

 

Italian Meatball Burgers combine ground beef and sausage for a saucy family-favorite.

Italian Meatball Burgers

 

These Smoky Black Bean Beet Burgers are vegan, but still get crispy on the outside and tender on the inside.

Smoky Black Bean Beet Burgers
Image and Recipe via Minimalist Baker

 

Thai Tuna Burgers with Ginger-Lemon Mayonnaise are perfect served with a cucumber salad instead of pickles.

Thai Tuna Burgers with Ginger-Lemon Mayonnaise

 

Bacon Cheddar Chicken Burgers with Guacamole and BBQ Mayo are super easy when made with frozen chicken patties and are healthier than a beef option.

Bacon Cheddar Chicken Burgers with Guacamole and BBQ Mayo + a Grilling Package Giveaway

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Controlling Asthma with Diet

Balancing and Controlling Asthma with Your Lifestyle

Controlling Asthma through Lifestyle

There is no way to magically cure your asthma, but eating a smart and healthy diet and keeping a healthy lifestyle can make a huge difference in controlling asthma.

The number of people with asthma has risen in the past 3 decades, and many wonder if it’s because of our changing diet without enough fruits and veggies.

Several studies have explored this connection. One found that teens with poor nutrition were more likely to have asthma.

And while nutrition is likely not the cause of asthma, it can be the cause of obesity. Being overweight makes you more likely to have severe asthma symptoms, take more meds, and miss more work.

Changes for Controlling Asthma

Eat lots of fruits and veggies.

Packed with antioxidants like beta carotene and vitamins C and E, fruits and veggies help with lung problems. Try controlling your asthma by adding more of these to your diet:

  • Apples, which have been tied to lower rates of asthma, possibly because of something in them called flavonoids that have been shown to open airways.
  • Cantaloupe, which is high in Vitamin C.
  • Carrots, which have a lot of beta carotene, can help reduce attacks caused by exercise.
  • Coffee, the caffeine in it can help open airways slightly for a few hours after drinking it.
  • Flax seeds, which are high in omega-3 fatty acids and magnesium which can relax your muscles, which can help open airways.
  • Garlic, which has long been used as a treatment for many things because it’s thought to be anti-inflammatory.
  • Avocados, which is a healthy antioxidant called glutathione.

Add more vitamin D.

Studies find that people with severe asthma have low levels of vitamin D. Work on controlling your asthma by adding more foods with plenty of vitamin D to your meals, like milk, eggs, and salmon.

Avoid trans fats.

Trans fats, found in many processed foods like margarine, can make your asthma worse and have been linked to other serious health conditions, like heart disease.

Look for sulfites.

Sulfites are a preservative that keeps foods like wine, dried fruits, pickles, and fresh and frozen shrimp good for longer. They give off sulfur dioxide which can irritate your lungs, and research has tied it to asthma flare-ups in some people.

This doesn’t mean you have to cut these from your diet. Just watch for a reaction for about an hour after you eat them.

Stay away from allergy-triggering foods.

Asthma puts you at a bigger risk for food allergies, and you can develop them late in life.

After you eat common allergy-triggering foods like nuts, soy, eggs, and dairy, keep an eye out for common allergy reactions:

  • Burning, teary, itchy, red, or swollen eyes
  • Coughing, wheezing, or a tight chest
  • Headache
  • Hives or skin rashes
  • Itchy nose, throat, or mouth
  • Runny nose
  • Sneezing

Avoid foods that trigger Gastroesophageal Reflux Disorder (GERD).

Up to 70% of people who have asthma, also have GERD, which is stomach acid reflux. GERD can make asthma symptoms worse.

While it can cause normal heartburn symptoms, it doesn’t always. You may need to take medicine or lose weight to manage GERD. But sometimes just eating smaller meals, cutting back on alcohol and caffeine, and avoiding eating before bed can help. You can also avoid foods that you know cause these problems for you.

Lose weight.

While losing weight isn’t easy, it can help your asthma. Eat a healthy and balanced diet and stay active. Make sure you talk to your doctor about how best to manage your asthma or use your meds so that you can exercise without causing attacks.

Drive Thru Choices

Smart Eating in the Drive Thru

Fast food can be easy, quick, and affordable. And there’s going to be times, like running around after school and work, but before your kid’s big game, that you just don’t have time to go home and cook. But, you should be careful to eat smart when you’re running through the drive thru.

From 2007 to 2010, American adults got 11.3% of their total daily calories from fast food. And when many fast food meals pack a high-calorie punch, it’s important to make the smartest choices possible.

Tips for the Drive Thru

Don’t add salt.

Fast food places are already adding plenty of salt to their food, so don’t add extra from the shaker to your fries.

Pick smart toppings.

Ketchup can have quite a bit of sugar, but sauces like honey mustard and BBQ have even more, and mayo is high in fat. Mustard is the perfect low-fat condiment. And pick veggies like onion, tomatoes, pickles, and lettuce instead of cheese or bacon.

Pay attention to names and menu descriptions.

Things that are labeled deep-fried, panfried, basted, batter-dipped, breaded, creamy, crispy, Alfredo, or in cream sauce are going to be high in calories, fat, and salt.

Don’t assume it’s healthy because it sounds like a health food.

Some fast food salads, like those with crispy chicken, lots of cheese, and heavy dressings, like ranch, can have more than a 1,000 calories! Some burgers have as few as 250 calories. Pay attention to what’s on each item.

Skip the soda.

Drink water, tea, or even coffee instead. Even diet soda is not helping your health.

Look at ALL of the menu.

Some places serve breakfast all day that can have healthier options. Kids’ menus can give you smaller, lower calorie portions. And you can always ask to remove or substitute certain ingredients.

Use technology.

More and more menus are listing calories, but it can be hard to read that in the drive thru while you’re also trying to choose and order. But technology makes it easy to check calorie-counts and nutrition info online. Some places, like Starbucks, even have nutrition info on their app. Take a minute before you go or while you’re waiting in a long line to check what your healthiest options are.

Stop your cravings.

If you’re hitting up the drive thru because of a craving, not because you’re short on time, learn how to make healthier, cheaper, and delicious versions of your favorite takeout at home. Our Pinterest can help you learn how.

Fitness Magazine also has some great recommendations for what you should order at some of your favorite fast food stops.