Tag Archives: phone app

An App for Better Dental Health

Long View: Dialing In to Better Dental Health

I have a confession to make. My toothbrush talks to my cellphone, and I’m pretty much OK with that. I’ve brushed my teeth well over 36,000 times in my time on this planet, and suddenly now, in my 50th year, I need my phone to tell me if I’ve been doing it correctly.

Having good teeth is a genetic gift I inherited from my grandmother. She grew up in an era before there was fluoride in the drinking water, and her father didn’t believe in traditional medicine. I wonder if she ever even went to the dentist as a child. And yet, when she passed away, well into her 90s, she didn’t have a single cavity.

I’m lucky to have inherited her teeth DNA. I’ve only had two cavities in my life and both came after a pregnancy and were so shallow I didn’t even need Novocain. So they don’t count.

This is good news because I have a very low gag threshold and can’t stand having any kind of metal dental instrument in my mouth. Just getting X-rays at the dentist once a year is traumatic for me. I have to give myself a pep talk while biting down. “Just breathe and don’t throw up, just breathe and don’t throw up.” If I had to withstand anything more exotic than a quick cleaning, the dentist would probably have to sedate me.

Getting back to my talking toothbrush, thanks to Bluetooth technology, an app on my phone tells me if I’m brushing long enough, too hard, too soft, or not long enough in a certain area. How my phone knows this is pure sorcery in my opinion, but I’m taking my phone’s advice and trying to do a better job of brushing. After all, good oral hygiene is a part of our overall health and well-being.

In my line of work, I get a lot of feedback from seniors on Medicare. Time and time again, one of their questions is, “How am I going to pay for my dental care?” This is a valid question because original Medicare does not pay for dental care. Without purchasing a separate dental insurance policy, the expenses of cleanings, X-rays, cavities, root canals, crowns, partials or even dentures must come out of your own pocket. (Whew, just typing those procedures made me queasy.)

Some people get to remain on their company’s dental insurance policy when they retire. Others will decide to purchase private dental insurance as part of their overall retirement health insurance expenses. Many people that don’t have these options are kind of left wondering what to do now.

There are many Medicare Advantage plans that offer members a set-amount dental benefit along with medical coverage to help offset some of the expense of dental care. It won’t provide as extensive of coverage as a private dental insurance policy does, but the benefit does help offset some (or all if you have teeth like my grandmother’s) expenses of good dental care.

If keeping your pearly whites in working order is a priority for you but the extra expense of full-blown dental insurance isn’t, a Medicare Advantage plan might be a solution. While you’re at it, you can consider looking into one of those high-tech toothbrushes like mine. As your mother always told you, the best dental care starts with good brushing habits.

Lora Felger is a community and broker liaison at Health Alliance. She is the mother of 2 terrific boys, a world traveler, and a major Iowa State Cyclones fan.

Fight the Common Food Allergy

Food Allergy Awareness Week

It was Food Allergy Awareness Week, so we had more info each day.

Find ways you can help raise awareness!

FARE_Poster_No_Crop
Image via FARE

 

Millions of people suffer from different kinds of allergies, and there are a lot of myths around them. Get informed on the facts:

Allergy Myths Dispelled
Image via Allergy Be Gone

 

This handy app, LifeCafe Healthy Pantry, can also help you find out what allergens are in your food. Search for it in your app store!

Peanuts are one of the most common food allergies for kids, but there are other nut butters you can try!

Nut Butter Alternatives

 

Eggs are another common food allergy, but there are easy substitutions you can try while cooking so you won’t even notice they’re gone:

Egg Substitutions
Image via Swanson Health Blog

 

If you’re allergic, or just avoiding added sugar, these are some of the best sugar alternatives to try.

Sugar Alternatives

 

Still adapting to a new food allergy? Or never found a good alternative? This chart can help you find options when you’re cooking:

This for That Chart
Image via eReplacementParts.com

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Medicare Basics Without an App

Vantage Point: There’s Not an App for That – But We Can Help!

Personal fitness trackers—like the Fitbit® or Jawbone®—are popular devices to help you keep your New Year’s resolutions and stay fit all year long. The fitness tracker collects data and sends it to a phone app that tracks physical activity, calorie intake, and sleep quality. Wouldn’t it be cool if the device included an insurance tab to help people navigate their Medicare benefits, too?

Could you imagine how you’d feel slipping on the device if it said,
• “You have adequate coverage for your current health.”
• “Your doctor is in-network, and the out-of-pocket cost for your upcoming appointment is $10.”
• “Warning, you are nearing the prescription coverage gap.”

Until that technology comes along, Health Alliance Medicare can help explain Medicare basics. Most people paid for Medicare Part A through their payroll taxes while they were working, so they don’t pay a premium now. Part A covers inpatient hospital procedures, but not the doctor who does the procedure.

Medicare Part B covers the doctor and requires a monthly premium. Both A and B have deductibles (what you pay before your coverage kicks in) and coinsurance (a percentage of total cost that you pay). Figuring out coinsurance is tricky because it’s hard to plan what the overall doctor visit or hospital cost will be.

Medicare Part D is for prescription drug coverage. If you don’t choose Part D when you become eligible for Medicare, you could pay a penalty, called the Late Enrollment Penalty, if you add it later. If you pay a lot for your medicine, it’s important to read your monthly Explanation of Benefits to see if and when you’ll fall into the coverage gap.

Medicare Advantage plans, like Health Alliance Medicare, are called Part C and cover every benefit of Original Medicare and more, plus you can add prescription drug coverage. Medicare Advantage plans can be an easy transition for those turning 65 because they look a lot like employer insurance plans.

Until someone invents a Medicare app, consider Health Alliance Medicare your source for information. Helping people get started with the right information to avoid common and costly pitfalls later is the best part of our jobs.