Tag Archives: outreach

Making Holiday Memories Together

Vantage Point: Making Precious Holiday Memories

Holiday memories can be such a precious thing for so many people. I have fun and fond memories of numerous holiday eves and mornings with my family. When I was growing up, the night before a holiday consisted of sharing the holiday evening at a relative’s house, surrounded by aunts, uncles, cousins, and maybe other family members, if they were able to attend.

When a holiday eve memory conversation starts up, we still to this day like to remind our parents how us 2 older kids (my cousin and myself) were always last to open presents, and how much we objected to that rule.

My holiday memories, however, are an ‘80s throwback when I recall them. I would often wake up before my parents (Hello! What kid didn’t do that!?), and spy on all my presents. I would then run into their room and wake them up, bursting with anticipation because I couldn’t wait to open my presents. This gleeful anticipation then turned into longing as I waited for my dad to put together “The Camera.”

“The Camera” was the typical, large and in charge, RCA camera of the ‘80s. We are talking VHS recording here. It often reminded me of a news camera, complete with the giant, blinding light. It seemed like it would take my dad literally forever to set this up in order to film my holiday morning memories.

My mother would finally call my name, after waiting what seemed like forever, and I had to play it like I had just woken up to a holiday present wonderland. (And like the camera had been placed there, all put together, from Santa himself…) So not only did I get to open presents (Finally!), but I also got this great memory of the most ‘80s camera, which we still laugh about.

Memories are so individualized to us, and not everyone has the same experience. This time of year, it’s important to look out for those who need a helping hand when resources may be tight and food insecurity is high.

There are food programs available in the area for seniors here in the Yakima Valley, such as Meals on Wheels. They have many site locations throughout the Valley. You can help give the gift of great holiday memories.

The holidays make me want to share my memories of holiday fun with family, snow, presents, and a large camera with a bright, white light that could probably land planes in our living room if we tried. I know that it’s a rather odd and really random memory, but it’s my family’s, and I still giggle over it to this day.

Now that I have kids, I hope that their memories are as fun and silly and original as mine, and that they look back on them with fondness. What fun holiday memories have you made or would like to make in the future?

Breck Obermeyer is a community liaison with Health Alliance Northwest, serving Yakima County. She is a homegrown girl from Naches and has a great husband who can fix anything and 2 kids who are her world. When not attending community events or providing Medicare education throughout the Valley, she can be found indulging in her hobbies of homesteading, pioneer cooking, and learning new survival techniques. She also has a strong love for all things Halloween.

How to Honor Veterans

Long View: Honor and Comfort a Veteran

My mother is a quilter. If anyone reading this knows a quilter or happens to be one yourself, you know that this is more a way of life than a hobby. 

Every important occasion in our family merits a quilt. Getting married? Quilt. Having a baby? Quilt. When you fly and look down on Midwestern corn and bean fields, what do you see? Mom sees potential quilt patterns.

Lately, barns have her very excited, because farmers (and the quilters in their lives) have started hanging pretty quilt patterns from their haylofts. When my youngest son was about 2, he would announce any cows, goats, or chickens he saw on a country drive. Now, I can count on my mom yelling out a barn quilt with the same childlike excitement. Mom would quilt for world peace if the United Nations asked her.

November is an important month in our country, because it’s the month we celebrate Veterans Day. How do you recognize Veterans Day? Of course, my mom would say, “I’ve got a quilt for that!”

The Quilts of Valor Foundation is an organization that seeks out and honors veterans by making and giving them handmade quilts. Their foundation’s motto is “Quilting to Honor and Comfort.” I like that. Here is a group of people with a passion for sewing something with their own 2 hands to make someone else feel better. To date, Quilts of Valor has given away over 165,000 quilts.

Let’s go back to the question, how do you recognize Veterans Day? Or better yet, do you recognize veterans? We live in a time in our nation’s history when veterans can look very different from one another.

Our nation’s veterans are handsome 90-year-old WWII veterans, hardworking and stoic Korean War veterans, proud but quiet Vietnam veterans, or even 25-year-old grandsons and granddaughters . 

The men and women who served our country have done so in my name, in your name. How can you recognize them today? How can you tell them that you see them and understand what they mean to our country? 

We can’t all make quilts. But we can buy cups of coffee. We can shake hands, or if appropriate, give a hug. We can all say thank you.   

Here are some organizations that reach out to veterans. See if you can find one in your community, and offer whatever special skill you might have to their cause. If you bake, bake. If you woodwork, woodwork.

Share yourself with a veteran so they know you care. It’s the very least any of us can do to honor and comfort the heroes around us.

Lora Felger is a community and broker liaison at Health Alliance. She is the mother of 2 terrific boys, a world traveler, and a major Iowa State Cyclones fan.

A Healthy A1C Level

Long View: What Does A1C Mean to Me?

Our community liaison team has never met a health fair or expo they didn’t love! Health fairs and expos are great places to learn about the abundance of services available in our communities to support seniors and their families.

With brightly colored, free shopping bags in hand, visitors gather pens, lip balms, and hand sanitizers, along with informational brochures and contact information for everything from beautiful, new living communities to financial planning. I’ve never seen so many butterscotch hard candies in one place since my grandmother’s candy dish in the 1970s.

Many health fairs and expos offer free checkups for various parts of your body and health. Participants aren’t the only ones taking advantage of a little free TLC. So far this summer, I’ve had the kinks rubbed out of my neck, the skin on my face analyzed for sun damage, and my blood pressure checked.

But one of the most interesting tests I’ve done recently came from my friends at Memorial Hospital in Carthage, IL. They measured my A1C level.

“What is A1C?” I asked, with a donut in one hand and a cup of coffee with cream in the other.

A1C is the measurement of the average blood sugar levels for the past 3 months, they told me. “Oh no,” I said. “I can’t get that done today. I’m eating a donut!”

The kind nurses assured me to sit down and relax. No fasting is required. In the blink of an eye, my finger was (painlessly) pricked, and a small amount of my blood slipped into a tiny little tube. The tube took a 5-minute spin in the centrifuge, and bingo, my A1C for the past 3 months is…. I’ll keep you in suspense until the end.

The National Diabetes Education Initiative recommends that diabetics have the A1C measurement taken at least twice a year. Everyone else should measure A1C once every 3 years. The nurses from Carthage recommended that most people should have measurements below 5.7%, since measurements between 5.7 and 6.4% indicate a greater risk for becoming diabetic.

The daily measurement of glucose levels is very important for diabetics who need to keep their levels within healthy ranges. Knowing your 2- to 3-month average can help you determine your overall glucose health, which in turn can help you make healthy choices throughout each day, like about sleeping, playing, working, eating, and more.

And if you don’t have diabetes, knowing if you have a higher than average A1C level can be a valuable piece of information to help you make healthy changes to curb your chances of getting diabetes at some point in your life.

Those who are already diabetic should strive to lower their A1C to at least 7% when possible. This could be a struggle for those who suffer from the disease, but the research points toward a much lower risk of developing diabetic complications like eye, heart, and kidney disease the closer you can get to 7%.

To tell you the truth, waiting for my blood to spin around for those 5 minutes in the centrifuge had me sweating a little. This could be the year my chickens come home to roost. I’ll be having one of those special birthdays next year where everyone wears black. I’m not exactly the healthiest eater. Leggings and stretchy-fabric pants have become my best friends.

This A1C measurement was an important wake-up call for me. The good news is that I measured well below 5.7%.

While I could have spiked the football, declared myself invincible, and grabbed a second donut, I didn’t. I decided to really pay attention to this information and be grateful for my health today, maybe take an extra walk around the block every week. Next year, I’m setting my sights on something in the high 4s.

Pass the kale.

Lora Felger is a community and broker liaison at Health Alliance. She is the mother of 2 terrific boys, a world traveler, and a major Iowa State Cyclones fan.

Mexican Folk Dancing

Vantage Point: Celebración de Culturas

We have a real interest in the people who make up the communities we serve. And while NCW is known for its many recreation activities and variety of agriculture, it’s also known for its diversity of people.

This month, we will help celebrate Mexican values and culture by participating in the Fiestas Mexicanas event on September 9 and 10. Fiestas Mexicanas is a nonprofit, all-volunteer organization and a partner of the Wenatchee Valley Museum & Cultural Center. Each year, it celebrates Latin American Independence Day with a family-friendly event that features traditional Latin food and great entertainment from local groups and groups coming directly from Mexico.

The event not only attracts the Latino community, but it also brings in people of all ethnic backgrounds, raising community awareness and education about the history, lifestyle, and people of Mexico.

Jessica Arroyo, our Wenatchee office’s member service representative, remembers performing Mexican folk dances at this event throughout grade and middle school.

Jessica wore traditional folk dresses, which have different designs and colors depending on the region of Mexico they represent. Bright colors like purple and red represent the inside region, white the coastal region, and black the lower regions of Mexico. Girls also wear their hair slicked black in buns with yarn braids, red lipstick, bright eye shadow, and big gold earrings.

Authentic Mexican folk dances have been handed down for generations, so for Jessica, born and raised in Wenatchee, Fiestas Mexicanas is about coming together with a community of people who share a common background.

Uriel Perez, who joined Jessica in representing Health Alliance at the 2015 celebration, says the best part of the event for him was the food vendors that created quality, authentic dishes that represented the best cuisine of Latin and Central America.

But for Uriel, just like other community events we participate in throughout the year, the biggest takeaway we can give people is that we have a Wenatchee customer service office that can provide face-to-face help with Medicare questions year-round.

Fiestas Mexicanas is dedicated to the preservation of family, friendship, and history, and a big part of the event is giving away scholarships and recognizing those who serve others. Health Alliance shares that value and invites you to learn more about the event.

Shannon Sims is a Medicare community liaison for Health Alliance, serving Chelan, Douglas, Grant, and Okanogan counties in Washington. During her time off she enjoys spending time with her family and riding horses.      

National Child Support Awareness Month

National Child Support Awareness Month

This week is National Child Support Awareness Month, and we have resources to help you and your kids.

Back-to-school can be expensive. Check out this local, free back-to-school haircut event.

Need help with back-to-school supplies? Find free school supplies in Illinois.

Back-to-School Creativity

 

Want to give back to help students in Illinois with supplies? Give to Operation Backpack.

Getting All Kids to School

 

Need help finding childcare? chambanamoms.com’s local guide can help you.

In Smart and Safe Hands

 

Find family-friendly events, including free ones, by following chambanamoms.com.

Free Fun for All

 

Child support resources in Illinois for parents, employers, and even lawyers are just a click away.

A Guiding Hand

 

Find fun ideas for spending time with your kids as a father and much more.

Father-Daughter Day

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The Human Experience and Cancer

Vantage Point: To Know the Road Ahead, Ask Those Coming Back

Sometimes it’s little celebrations, like your first haircut after you’ve lost it all, and sometimes its big, like circling the day of your last chemo treatment on the calendar.

My friend who was diagnosed with cancer always wished for just one more normal day. She never got it, but she taught us all bravery through her journey. Cancer doesn’t play fair. But despite its devastation, it can also reveal the true beauty, valor, and resilience within us.

In Grant County, one organization stands up to support cancer patients by offering encouragement, hope, and support beyond the medical course of treatment. The Columbia Basin Cancer Foundation (CBCF) identifies individual needs, providing help throughout the process of diagnosis, treatment, and recovery. The board consists of local volunteers and courageous staff committed to caring for their clients with a true measure of grace.

Common services include gas cards to help garner access to life-saving care, wigs and head coverings, outdoor chore services, family photographs to inspire hope for recovery, cutting edge educational materials, and dietary information to combat side effects, like loss of appetite, changes in smell, sore mouth, nausea, and fatigue.

According to Angel Kneedler, executive director of the foundation, “It takes a village,” and a profoundly important aspect of the foundation is its human connection. CBCF has the ability to expedite the decision-making process and partner with other local agencies. Such was the case when it helped a recently widowed woman, living in a hospice situation in agricultural housing with little time to spare, get herself and her 6 children to her sister’s house in Colorado so she could pass among family. This helped grant her last simple wish, that her children be taken care of and not institutionalized.

“To know the road ahead, ask those coming back,” is a Chinese proverb that I think illustrates the resolve needed to battle cancer. Health Alliance supports the Columbia Basin Cancer Foundation as it goes above and beyond to help our neighbors in this fight. If you would like to do the same, join us at the Annual Country Sweethearts Dinner, Dance, and Auction on Feb 6. This fun event celebrates milestones achieved, and the money raised goes back to our local Grant and Adam counties. For more information, visit their website or call 509-764-4644.

Shannon Sims is a Medicare community liaison for Health Alliance, serving Chelan, Douglas, Grant and Okanogan counties in Washington. She has four sons and two grandsons. During her time off, she performs as part of a rodeo drill team on her horse, Skeeter.      

 

A Happy Ending from Your Decisions

Vantage Point: Life Is Not Like The Brady Bunch

Growing up watching The Brady Bunch, I loved how when there was a problem, like Jan getting a bad perm, Greg having his first fender bender, or Marcia getting braces, it was always resolved in a happy ending by the end of the episode.

I didn’t think to question how Mr. and Mrs. Brady could afford to raise 6 kids and pay for a maid and the mortgage on a tri-level house. I know now, from raising my own kids, that braces are really expensive, and so is adding teenagers to your car insurance. Real-life decisions don’t always end as positively as a Brandy Bunch episode.

In my work, I counsel people who made a choice that costs them later. For example, if you don’t pick up prescription drug coverage when you first become Medicare eligible and then realize you need to add it later, you’ll get charged a late enrollment penalty. Many times in these cases, members have sadly told me that they didn’t know or that no one had told them. They’ve truly taught me the importance of staying informed.

Recently, I had the chance to meet with Callie Klein from COUNTRY Financial, and we found that we share a mutual desire to learn about each other’s professional services.

We know Medicare can be confusing, so we do our best to help people make sense of their options. Retirement planning can also be confusing, but Callie helped me to understand how choices like life insurance and long-term care can affect your financial future. Callie pointed out that people are living longer, and some people can spend just as many years in retirement as they did on their career. That’s what makes it so important to plan ahead, so your resources match your longevity.

As we enter a new year, I am reminded how fast time goes and how important it is to give some thought to your future now. Set some long-term goals rather than just short-term resolutions.

If you haven’t already and need help, I encourage you to seek out a professional like Callie. She showed a genuine concern for her clients and a desire to guide them toward the decisions that will help them attain their future retirement goals. Professionals like her can help you at least become educated and stay informed.

Most importantly, though, I wish you happiness in 2016, and I hope that, like an episode of The Brady Bunch, your biggest problems are resolved quickly and with a happy ending.

Shannon Sims is a Medicare community liaison for Health Alliance, serving Chelan, Douglas, Grant and Okanogan counties in Washington. She has four sons and two grandsons. During her time off, she performs as part of a rodeo drill team on her horse, Skeeter.