Tag Archives: older people

Older Driver Safety Awareness Week

Older Driver Safety Awareness Week

It’s Older Driver Safety Awareness Week, and the ability to drive safely can be affected by changes in our physical, emotional, and cognitive health. Although these changes are part of normal aging, they can affect each individual at different rates.

Just as one plans for retirement, it’s important to plan for your transportation needs.

Planning for Future Transportation

 

December is the perfect time to have a conversation with loved ones as you come together for the holidays.

Talking to Family About Driving As They Age

 

When an older driver decides it’s time for a check-up, useful driving fitness education tools can help identify challenges and help them adjust.

Evaluate Your Ability to Drive As You Age

 

Driving intervention plans, drawn up between a client and therapist, can help older individuals drive safely for as long as possible.

When someone needs to adjust to keep driving or can no longer drive, family and friends can help with resources for independent transportation in the community.

Planning for a Future Without Driving

 

Exploring alternative types of transportation can help older adults stay independent. Options can include community networks, public transit, and ride sharing apps.

Resources to Stay Independent

 

Vision problems and certain medications can also cause issues driving early. Talk to your doctor to get help.

Health Issues and Driving As You Age

Hunger Action Month

Hunger Action Month

It’s Hunger Action Month, and in 2018, 40 million Americans are dealing with hunger. 12 million of those are children, and more than 5 million are seniors. Help make a difference.

Americans and Food Safety

 

1 in 6 kids in America don’t always know where they’ll get their next meal. Free breakfast and lunch programs at school can make a huge difference in their lives.

 

The Importance of School Meals

 

Children facing hunger are more likely to struggle in school, repeat a grade, have developmental impairments, have social and behavior problems, or have health conditions.

Kids and Hunger

 

Some senior citizens are having to choose between medical care and food because of costs. Those struggling with hunger are also more likely to have chronic health conditions.

2.4 million people who live in rural communities face hunger and food deserts, and 86% of the counties with the highest rates of children facing hunger are rural.

Rural Food Deserts

 

Three-quarters of the counties with the highest rates of food insecurity are in rural areas, and mobile pantries that distribute food are one of the best ways to help.

Improving Food Insecurity

 

Those dealing with hunger and food insecurity also struggle to get enough food to support a healthy life and are more likely to spend money on heavily processed foods based on cost and convenience.

Healthy Food = Healthy Life

Long-Term Care Awareness Month

Long-Term Care Awareness Month

November is Long-Term Care Awareness Month, and 70% of those over age 65 will require long-term care in the future.

Preparing to Grow Together

 

Whether you’re already on Medicare or planning for the future, make sure you understand how Medicare will help you pay for long-term care.

Understanding Medicare and Long-Term Care

 

78% of adults receiving care at home rely on loved ones for care. There are 45 million informal caregivers in the U.S.

Getting Care at Home

 

92% of family caregivers make a major work change from full-time to part-time hours or take a leave of absence to be a caregiver.

Caregivers' Lives

 

11% of caregivers moved closer to a parent or family member to give them more care.

Moving Back for Loved Ones

 

Long-term care takes a physical, mental, and emotional toll on you, your caregivers, and other loved ones. Take steps to avoid burnout.

National Family Caregivers Month

 

Get resources and support if you’re a caregiver providing long-term care.

Protecting Yourself and Your Loved Ones

National Home Care and Hospice Month

National Home Care and Hospice Month

November is National Home Care and Hospice Month. Home health care includes a wide range of care you can get for an illness or injury at home.

Home care is usually less expensive, more convenient, and just as effective as care in a hospital.

Home Care

 

Hospice is special care for people who are terminally ill, including medical and physical care and help with social, emotional, and spiritual needs.

Hospice Care

 

An important part of home care and hospice is being prepared for the future. Document your decisions for your loved ones.

Preparing for the Future

 

If you’re a caregiver, you should understand your loved ones’ home care and hospice options.

Prepared Caregivers

 

If you or a loved one has a serious issue, palliative care, or specialized medical care tailored to you, can help relieve your symptoms and improve your life.

Planning for Long-Term Care

 

Advance directives help your loved ones carry out your wishes in life-threatening circumstances. Have yours ready.

Having Your Advance Directives Ready

Sharing Personal Histories

Vantage Point: The Importance of Our Personal Histories

Recently, I was sitting at a local senior center, talking to several retirees. I asked what professions they were in prior to their retirement, and one gentleman’s answer struck me hard.

He said he was a cartographer, or map maker, but that his skill and history were no longer relevant. I found this most interesting and asked him to give me an idea of what his job was like.

He started to tell me and then said, “But I am no longer relevant to this day and time due to technology.” My first reaction was pure shock and then sadness. This man, who had worked more than 30 years as a cartographer, thinks that he is no longer relevant.

Many of us sitting at the table found this to be the most interesting profession of everyone in the conversation. And as he started to tell us what he did in his job, I could only think how awesome it would be for our younger generation to hear his story.

As he finished up his story, I asked him why he thinks he’s not relevant anymore. He said, with today’s technology, few humans are needed in the creation of maps since they have drones and computers now to do what he and others did “back in the day.”

I reminded him that his history and knowledge were valuable and needed by our younger generations. The skillset needed for his job when technology was scarce needs to be heard. The history of cartographers is still vital and very important, even with the advanced technology that we have.

Everyone at the table agreed with me and joined in my admiration of his profession and knowledge.

Through my work, I have met teachers, chefs, firefighters, coaches, doctors, and now a cartographer. They all have great stories infused with history, skill, and knowledge. It’s also obvious that they loved what they did and want to share their story.

Remembering that we all have value in every part of our lives is important, whether it’s when we are young and working, or when we get older and retire. Our histories are relevant no matter where we are in our lives, and they need to be shared, remembered, and heard by all.

Joy Stanford is a community liaison with Health Alliance, serving Thurston County. She’s been involved with Medicare for 20+ years and truly enjoys it. She enjoys gospel, R&B, and country music, and she owns over 100 pairs of shoes.

Getting Older with Grace

Long View: How Do You Know You’re Getting Older?

When I started working in the Medicare department, I was ignorant about Medicare and insurance of any kind. It seemed like a growth industry, and I was blessed with 7 family members over the age of 75.

15 year later, I have a much more personal interest in the subject. This aging thing is not as easy as I thought it would be. Things change.

I’ve made progress in the meantime. I used to think being online and connected was not that necessary. Now I couldn’t live without it.

Please note, the perception that older people don’t like to use technology is false. According to Nielsen research published in 2009, 89% of people 65+ have personal email and use it regularly. And as of 2015, Pew Research Center reports 59% of those over 65 go online, and 35% of everyone over 65 uses social media, approximately 16 million people.

I used to take extra time getting ready for a big event. When I was done, I would look in the mirror and say, ”You look good.” Now, when I go through all the same steps, I look in in the mirror and say, “You look clean.”

When did I stop hearing, “You look great,” and start hearing, “You look great for your age”? Probably around the same time folks went from saying, “I like your new glasses,” to “Your new glasses take 5 years off your face.” Ugh.

I’ve learned not to ask anyone how old they are unless they are under the age of 12. Even then, I would think twice about it. If anyone forces you to guess how old they are, make a fair guess, and then subtract 15 years. No one ever complains.

From 2014 to 2060, the older population, people age 65 and older, in the United States will more than double from 46 million to over 98 million. More surprising, the oldest of the older population, people over age 85, are the fastest growing segment, according to the U.S. Census Bureau.

Aging is tough. Often we have to forgo many of the activities of our youth such as:

  • Driving a car
  • Living independently
  • Eating anything you want
  • Staying up all night
  • Getting a haircut
  • Worrying about the small stuff (Oh wait, that’s a good thing.)

Personally, as I navigate this process of maturing, I try to remember we are all getting older. It’s not always an easy process, so I hope my friends and family help me do it with grace and dignity.

Patrick Harness is a community liaison with a long history of experience in health insurance. If you ask him to pick a color, he always chooses orange, and he is known for his inability to parallel park.

Protection to Prevent Burn

Burn Awareness Week

It’s Burn Awareness Week. Burns continue to be one of the leading causes of accidental death in the U.S. and can cause lasting pain and disabilities in survivors.

Don't Get Burned

 

Avoid burns and scalds while cooking with these tips.

 

Use the back burners while you cook, and turn pot handles away from the stove’s edge.

Back Burners to Avoid Burns

 

Use oven mitts and pot holders, and make sure you replace old and worn mitts.

Children, elderly people, and the disabled are at the highest risk for burns, and almost 1/3 of all burns happen to kids under 15.

Preventing Burns and Scars

 

Children under 5 are 2.4 times more likely than the general population to suffer burn injuries that need emergency treatment.

Protecting Kids from Burns

 

Never carry children while preparing or drinking hot liquids (or foods) and teach them burn safety.