Tag Archives: older people

Long-Term Care Awareness Month

Long-Term Care Awareness Month

November is Long-Term Care Awareness Month, and 70% of those over age 65 will require long-term care in the future.

Preparing to Grow Together

 

Whether you’re already on Medicare or planning for the future, make sure you understand how Medicare will help you pay for long-term care.

Understanding Medicare and Long-Term Care

 

78% of adults receiving care at home rely on loved ones for care. There are 45 million informal caregivers in the U.S.

Getting Care at Home

 

92% of family caregivers make a major work change from full-time to part-time hours or take a leave of absence to be a caregiver.

Caregivers' Lives

 

11% of caregivers moved closer to a parent or family member to give them more care.

Moving Back for Loved Ones

 

Long-term care takes a physical, mental, and emotional toll on you, your caregivers, and other loved ones. Take steps to avoid burnout.

National Family Caregivers Month

 

Get resources and support if you’re a caregiver providing long-term care.

Protecting Yourself and Your Loved Ones

Sharing Personal Histories

Vantage Point: The Importance of Our Personal Histories

Recently, I was sitting at a local senior center, talking to several retirees. I asked what professions they were in prior to their retirement, and one gentleman’s answer struck me hard.

He said he was a cartographer, or map maker, but that his skill and history were no longer relevant. I found this most interesting and asked him to give me an idea of what his job was like.

He started to tell me and then said, “But I am no longer relevant to this day and time due to technology.” My first reaction was pure shock and then sadness. This man, who had worked more than 30 years as a cartographer, thinks that he is no longer relevant.

Many of us sitting at the table found this to be the most interesting profession of everyone in the conversation. And as he started to tell us what he did in his job, I could only think how awesome it would be for our younger generation to hear his story.

As he finished up his story, I asked him why he thinks he’s not relevant anymore. He said, with today’s technology, few humans are needed in the creation of maps since they have drones and computers now to do what he and others did “back in the day.”

I reminded him that his history and knowledge were valuable and needed by our younger generations. The skillset needed for his job when technology was scarce needs to be heard. The history of cartographers is still vital and very important, even with the advanced technology that we have.

Everyone at the table agreed with me and joined in my admiration of his profession and knowledge.

Through my work, I have met teachers, chefs, firefighters, coaches, doctors, and now a cartographer. They all have great stories infused with history, skill, and knowledge. It’s also obvious that they loved what they did and want to share their story.

Remembering that we all have value in every part of our lives is important, whether it’s when we are young and working, or when we get older and retire. Our histories are relevant no matter where we are in our lives, and they need to be shared, remembered, and heard by all.

Joy Stanford is a community liaison with Health Alliance, serving Thurston County. She’s been involved with Medicare for 20+ years and truly enjoys it. She enjoys gospel, R&B, and country music, and she owns over 100 pairs of shoes.

Getting Older with Grace

Long View: How Do You Know You’re Getting Older?

When I started working in the Medicare department, I was ignorant about Medicare and insurance of any kind. It seemed like a growth industry, and I was blessed with 7 family members over the age of 75.

15 year later, I have a much more personal interest in the subject. This aging thing is not as easy as I thought it would be. Things change.

I’ve made progress in the meantime. I used to think being online and connected was not that necessary. Now I couldn’t live without it.

Please note, the perception that older people don’t like to use technology is false. According to Nielsen research published in 2009, 89% of people 65+ have personal email and use it regularly. And as of 2015, Pew Research Center reports 59% of those over 65 go online, and 35% of everyone over 65 uses social media, approximately 16 million people.

I used to take extra time getting ready for a big event. When I was done, I would look in the mirror and say, ”You look good.” Now, when I go through all the same steps, I look in in the mirror and say, “You look clean.”

When did I stop hearing, “You look great,” and start hearing, “You look great for your age”? Probably around the same time folks went from saying, “I like your new glasses,” to “Your new glasses take 5 years off your face.” Ugh.

I’ve learned not to ask anyone how old they are unless they are under the age of 12. Even then, I would think twice about it. If anyone forces you to guess how old they are, make a fair guess, and then subtract 15 years. No one ever complains.

From 2014 to 2060, the older population, people age 65 and older, in the United States will more than double from 46 million to over 98 million. More surprising, the oldest of the older population, people over age 85, are the fastest growing segment, according to the U.S. Census Bureau.

Aging is tough. Often we have to forgo many of the activities of our youth such as:

  • Driving a car
  • Living independently
  • Eating anything you want
  • Staying up all night
  • Getting a haircut
  • Worrying about the small stuff (Oh wait, that’s a good thing.)

Personally, as I navigate this process of maturing, I try to remember we are all getting older. It’s not always an easy process, so I hope my friends and family help me do it with grace and dignity.

Patrick Harness is a community liaison with a long history of experience in health insurance. If you ask him to pick a color, he always chooses orange, and he is known for his inability to parallel park.

Protection to Prevent Burn

Burn Awareness Week

It’s Burn Awareness Week. Burns continue to be one of the leading causes of accidental death in the U.S. and can cause lasting pain and disabilities in survivors.

Don't Get Burned

 

Avoid burns and scalds while cooking with these tips.

 

Use the back burners while you cook, and turn pot handles away from the stove’s edge.

Back Burners to Avoid Burns

 

Use oven mitts and pot holders, and make sure you replace old and worn mitts.

Children, elderly people, and the disabled are at the highest risk for burns, and almost 1/3 of all burns happen to kids under 15.

Preventing Burns and Scars

 

Children under 5 are 2.4 times more likely than the general population to suffer burn injuries that need emergency treatment.

Protecting Kids from Burns

 

Never carry children while preparing or drinking hot liquids (or foods) and teach them burn safety.

Marking Milestones

Long View: Making the Most of Milestones

As a culture, we recognize milestones. We count the years with class reunions, wedding anniversaries, or years logged since a cancer diagnosis. It has been a few months, but I bet the majority of readers can tell me how many years it had been since the Chicago Cubs had last won the World Series.

As parents, we carefully record that first step, first tooth, first time rolling over. At least we do for the first baby; the second, third, fourth… maybe not quite as detailed. This month, I’m celebrating a birthday that ends in a 9.  This is a milestone in a way, a preamble to a new decade. To be completely honest, it’s more about clinging to the final year left in my current decade.

My sons had a great-grandfather who was meticulous in keeping track of each great-grandchild’s birthday. He carried a pocket calendar around and recorded every date in his precious, shaky handwriting, making sure to not miss a single date for each of his 12 great-grandkids. It was so touching to me, and I made sure to never miss that World War II veteran’s birthday either.

Today we are reminded of birthdays and anniversaries through social media. Facebook has made me a much better friend because I never would have put all of those dates into a traditional calendar. I could not keep up with sending something as old-fashioned as a card via something as truly antiquated as the mail. With just a few clicks, I can send a birthday cake emoji with a couple of exclamation points through cyberspace and am on top of things.

Some milestones can be bittersweet, like the first holiday after a grandmother passes away or a 75th wedding anniversary that never happened because one of the spouses is no longer with us. I toasted the 100th birthday of my grandmother even though she left us at 94 years old.

Do you reach out to your elderly family and friends when special dates pop up on the calendar?  These dates don’t have to be completely solemn occasions. Reaching out to remember a wedding anniversary with a widower can bring back happy memories of a beautiful marriage, not to mention the fact that you have taken the time to call or visit with this person and recognize the importance of the day.

You may not want to just send an emoji to your great grandmother. Take the time to send a card and handwritten note or better yet, stop by for a visit.

Can you imagine how you would feel at 29, 39, or 49 if your important milestone wasn’t important to anyone else?  Someone 79, 89, or 99 feels exactly the same way.

Here is an idea. This February, make an elder your valentine.

Lora Felger is a community and broker liaison at Health Alliance. She is the mother of 2 terrific boys, a world traveler, and a major Iowa State Cyclones fan.

Beat the Flu Before It Starts

The Importance of Getting That Flu Shot

Each year, you see reminders that you should get your flu shots everywhere you go. But only about 42.1 million people in the U.S. do, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Less than half of adults under the age of 65 got the shot during the 2014 to 2015 flu season.

But the flu is still dangerous, and people can and do die from it each year. And we don’t know how serious the flu will be each year. From 1976 to 2007, the number of people who’ve died each year has ranged from 3,000 to 49,000.

And in recent years, 80 to 90% of those deaths have been in the 65-or-older population.

So while you may not have thought the flu was a danger before, make sure you get the facts and get protected this year.

What is the Flu Season?

Flu season in the United States can start as early as October and last until as late as May. The most serious period of outbreaks usually peaks in January.

The flu makes its way through the American people during this time, and a flu shot is the best way to protect yourself and those around you each year.

Who Needs to Get the Flu Shot?

Everyone over 6 months old should get the flu shot, but it’s especially important for kids, pregnant women, and those over 65. The flu can be more dangerous for these people and for others at high risk.

Even if you may not be in one of these groups, you should still get the shot. While you never want to get sick, it’s important to get your shot to help your community and those most at risk around you.

Like with all vaccines, the more people who get protected, the less likely the flu will appear in your community at all. The more people who aren’t protected, the more likely it is that lots of people will get sick, even those who did get protected, because it can get stronger passing between people.

Who Should Not Get the Shot?

Different flu vaccines work for different people, so your age, current or past health, and allergies can all affect if you should get the shot. Some people shouldn’t get the shot, and some people are at risk and should talk to their doctor first.

When Should I Get the the Shot?

You should get vaccinated as early as you can, usually before or in October. It takes about 2 weeks for your body to build antibodies to the flu from the vaccines, so it’s best to get it before the flu starts to spread in your community. However, it’s better to get it early or late rather than never.

How Does the Flu Shot Work?

To make vaccines, scientists and drug makers study what strains of the flu virus happen in the lower half of the world during its flu season, June, July, and August, and use this to build flu shots for our flu season.

Depending on how well that vaccine matches the flu virus in our flu season, it can reduce the overall risk of flu by 50 to 60%.

While it helps you build your resistance to the flu, flu shots can’t actually give you the flu because the virus is dead before it’s put in the shot.

For the next flu season, shots will include 3 or 4 strains, but the nasal vaccine shouldn’t be used this year, according the CDC. Recent studies have shown it wasn’t effective in the past few flu seasons.

You need a new shot every year because your protection fades over time, and because the shot could be made up of different strains from year to year.

Get your flu shot at covered pharmacies and protect your family and community this flu season.

Play for National Parks and Rec Month

National Parks and Rec Month

July is National Parks and Rec Month, and you should take advantage of your community’s parks and activities to get active!

Visit your local pool to cool off and get moving with classes like water aerobics and swim lessons, or at some, you can even join night swims or walk against a lazy river.

Water Workout

 

Stay fit as you get older with walks, exercise classes, and activities from your local park district.

Active as You Age

 

Camps and day camps from your park district can be the perfect summer activity for your kids.

Camp Fun

 

However you want to move, from kickboxing and  yoga to line dancing, your park district has the class for you.

Work Out Your Way

 

Be prepared to save a life with CPR classes from your local park district or hospital.

Save Lives with CPR

 

Find fun, safe events and classes for your teens on things like babysitting.

Safe Teens

 

If you or your kids love to compete, join a team to get active.

Compete Your Way to Fitness

Save

Save

Save