Tag Archives: mouth

Through with Chewing Tobacco

Quitting Chewing Tobacco

Chewing tobacco can be just as dangerous for your health as other forms of tobacco. It’s time to quit for Through with the Chew Week.

Chewing tobacco is tied to many mouth problems, including mouth, tongue, cheek, and gum cancer, and can also cause cancer in the esophagus and pancreas.

Smokeless Tobacco Dangers

 

Chew can cause leukoplakia, or gray-white patches in the mouth that can become cancer.

Chewing Tobacco and Cancer

 

Chewing tobacco also stains your teeth, causes bad breath, and destroys your gum tissue.

Protect Your Mouth from Tobacco

 

If you regularly use smokeless tobacco, you’re more likely to have gum disease, cavities, tooth decay, and expensive dental issues.

Protect Your Teeth from Tobacco

 

All forms of tobacco, including the smokeless kind, increase your risk of heart disease and high blood pressure.

Kick the Chew for Your Teeth

 

When you chew tobacco, you also raise your risk of heart attack, stroke, and serious pregnancy complications.

Smokeless tobacco can also lead to nicotine poisoning and death in kids who mistake it for candy.

Chewing Tobbaco and Kids

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Protect Your Children's Dental Health

Foods for Children’s Dental Health

It’s National Children’s Dental Health Month, so we have some recipes to try to work into your kids’ diets that are good for their teeth.

Cheese has been found to raise the PH in your mouth, which lowers risk of tooth decay.

For your adventurous eaters, try this healthy Cheesy Turkey Stuffed Peppers.

Cheesy Turkey Stuffed Peppers
Image and Recipe via Cookie Named Desire

 

Yogurt’s probiotics are good for your gums. Try these 7 Healthy Fro-Yo Recipes.

7 Healthy Fro-Yo Recipes
Image and Recipes via Greatist

 

Leafy greens are high in calcium and vitamins for your teeth. Sneak them in with 20 Healthy Green Smoothie Recipes.

20 Healthy Green Smoothie RecipesImage and Recipe via Yummy Healthy Easy

 

Apples help you produce saliva that rinses out your mouth and is good for your gums.

Try Apple Pie in a Jar for a fun new way to get your kids to eat their apple a day.

Apple Pie in a Jar
Image and Recipe via Vie de la Vegan

 

Carrots can help lower your risk of cavities and are a great source of fiber and vitamin A.

If your kids love pasta, this Raw Carrot Pasta with Peanut Sauce is a great way to get their veggies.

Raw Carrot Pasta with Peanut Sauce
Image and Recipe via Betsy Life

 

Celery has great vitamins that are good for gums, and it acts like a toothbrush scraping out food and bacteria.

The apples in this Celery Root and Apple Salad can help convince your kids to get their veggies in.

Celery Root and Apple SaladImage and Recipe via Gourmande in the Kitchen

 

Almonds are a great source of calcium and protein while being low in sugar.

These Sea Salt Dark Chocolate Almond Clusters taste like candy and are good for your teeth.

Sea Salt Dark Chocolate Almond Clusters
Image and Recipe via Sally’s Baking Addiction

Protecting Your Pets for Christmas

Holiday Pet Safety

You may not have realized that the holidays can be a dangerous time for your furry friends, but these holiday pet safety tips can help.

Make sure your Christmas tree is anchored so it can’t tip and fall when your pets jostle it.

Christmas tree water may contain fertilizers and is a breeding ground for bacteria, which can cause upset stomachs in pets.

Christmas Trees and Your Pets

 

Avoid mistletoe and holly. Holly causes nausea in pets, and mistletoe upsets their stomachs and can cause heart problems.

Avoiding Poisonous Christmas Plants

 

Kitties love sparkly tinsel, but when they nibble on it, it can cause blocked digestive tracts, which can lead to expensive surgery.

Protecting Playful Kitties

 

Keep wires and glass and plastic ornaments out of paws’ reach to avoid electric shocks and cuts to feet and mouths.

Curious Kittens and Ornaments

 

Make sure batteries aren’t left in pets’ reach. They can cause burns to the mouth and esophagus when punctured.

Toy Safety Around Pets

 

As you count down to the new year, avoid confetti strings, which can get stuck in pets’ intestines, and noise poppers and fireworks around timid pets.

Fighting Pet Fear

Avoiding Food Allergies for Food Allergy Awareness Week

Food Allergy Awareness Week 2016

This week is Food Allergy Awareness Week, so we’re bringing you facts about food allergies each day. Learn more.

Food Allergy Breakdown

 

Bodily Reaction

 

Milk and Egg Allergies

 

Allergy Signs and Symptoms

 

Treating a Reaction

 

Cleaning Surfaces

 

Cooking for Those with Food Allergies

 

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Learning About Your Family's Diabetes

Around the Web: You and Your Family’s Diabetes

According to the American Diabetes Association (ADA), in 2012, 29.1 million people had diabetes, and 8.1 million of them didn’t even know they had it. Managing you and your family’s diabetes can be a challenge.

Sometimes, you don’t realize the reach the disease can have on your health and your lives.

Diabetes Guides

These visual guides can help you understand the difference between type 1 diabetes and type 2 diabetes.

Your diabetes can affect your feet,  eyes, and mouth. These guides tell you how diabetes affects them, and ways to prevent problems.

Controlling your blood sugar through an insulin-based treatment plan can be tricky, but these tips can help.

Your blood sugar can also swing for reasons other than what you eat, so awareness is key.

When you’re first diagnosed, insulin injections can be a scary part of dealing with your diabetes. This guide can help walk you through the process.

You can also check out the YouTube video playlist Diabetes Basics from the ADA to learn more about how diabetes works and ways to protect yourself.

Your Family’s Diabetes

Of the 9.3% of the U.S. population who has diabetes, about 208,000 people are under age 20. And when you’re still growing up, the age difference can change the affects, both physically and emotionally.

The ADA’s page For Parents and Kids is a great place to start as you explore your child’s diabetes. Be Healthy Today; Be Healthy for Life is also an in-depth resource for kids and their families about living with type 2 diabetes.

The National Diabetes Education Program also has these PDFs of helpful info and tips written specifically for teens and their needs:

The ADA also has a page, Everyday Life, that helps you find resources to help your kids live with diabetes through all the stages and events of life. Topics include leaving them with babysitters, telling others, playing sports, and even parties, dating, and driving.

Their YouTube channel also has a playlist of videos to help you make sure your kids are Safe at School.

For additional resources and ways we can help, visit us online and join our Diabetes Disease Management program.

Treating Diabetes with Glucose Checks

Treating Diabetes

There isn’t a cure for diabetes, but it is very treatable. Treating diabetes depends on which type of diabetes you have.

Type 1 Diabetes

Because those with type 1 diabetes can’t produce enough of their own insulin, they must treat their diabetes with insulin injections.

Type 2 Diabetes

For many, treatment for type 2 diabetes focuses on diet and exercise. If blood sugar levels stay high, oral medications can help your body better produce insulin.

In some cases, insulin injections are used.

For those who who are at risk of TOFI type 2 diabetes, it’s important to:

  • Exercise, which is the only way to shed fat on the abdominal organs.
  • Lower stress, which can temporarily raise your blood sugar.
  • Diet smart by avoiding “diet foods” that are actually loaded with sugar, like low-fat salad dressings and vitamin drinks.

Gestational Diabetes

Treatment for gestational diabetes needs to happen quickly to protect you and your baby.

Treatment tries to keep your blood sugar levels at the same levels as healthy pregnant women’s through a combination of these:

  • Specialized meal plans
  • Regular, scheduled physical activity
  • Daily blood sugar testing
  • Insulin injections

It’s important to work with your doctor to make a treatment plan in all cases, but especially with gestational diabetes where personal changes are important for protecting your baby.

Testing

The A1c test measures your average blood sugar level over 2-3 months. Your doctor will generally order it every 3-6 months depending on which type of diabetes you have to keep an eye on how your treatment is working.

For most adults, the American Diabetes Association’s suggests your A1c be under 7%, but your doctor will help you decide what’s best for you. Studies show that people with diabetes keep normal A1c levels live five years longer, on average.

Checking your blood sugar with your personal meter helps you manage your treatment on a day-to-day basis. It gives you info right away to help you make decisions about taking your insulin, when to exercise, and tell you if you’re on track.

Keeping normal blood sugar levels reduces the risk of high cholesterol, and controlling your cholesterol can lower heart complications by 50%.

These two tests work together to tell you how your diabetes management is going. This chart shows what an A1c level translates to in blood sugar levels:

A1c Average Blood Sugar (mg/dl)

6% 126

7% 154

8% 183

9% 212

10%    240

11%    269

12%    298

Insulin Injections

The biggest challenge to people who are treating diabetes with insulin injections is balancing exactly how much insulin you need to take, which can vary based on:

  • Food
  • Exercise
  • Stress
  • Current emotions
  • General health

Not balancing these factors and your insulin can result in hypoglycemia and hyperglycemia.

Hypoglycemia is when you eat too little food, take too much insulin or diabetes meds, or get extra exercise, which causes your blood sugar levels to be too low.

Hyperglycemia is when you eat too much food, don’t take enough insulin, or are stressed or sick, and then your blood sugar levels are too high.

The best way to know if your blood sugar is high or low is to test your levels. But it’s also good to know the warning signs:

Hypoglycemia

  • Shaky
  • Dizzy
  • Nervous
  • Sweaty
  • Hungry
  • Clumsy
  • Confused
  • Trouble paying attention
  • Tingling mouth
  • Headache
  • Pale face
  • Seizure
  • Passing out

Hyperglycemia

  • Going to the bathroom a lot
  • Thirsty
  • Tired
  • Weak
  • Blurry vision
  • Hungry, even when you’ve eaten.

When your blood sugar level is too low, you can:

  • Eat or drink something with 15 grams of carbs:
    • Try three glucose tablets, 4 ounces of apple or orange juice, 4 ounces regular soda, 1 tablespoon cake frosting or three Jolly Ranchers.
    • Wait 15 minutes, and then check your blood glucose level again.
    • If your blood glucose is still too low, eat another 15 grams of carbs. Wait another 15 minutes, and then check your blood glucose again. You may want to keep eating until you feel better, but it’s very important to wait the full 15 minutes.

If you or your care team feel your signs are serious, inject glucagon which is the opposite of insulin—it raises your blood glucose level.

If your blood sugar is high, it’s important to remember that one high blood sugar reading isn’t a big deal, it happens to everyone from time to time. But if you keep running high day after day, talk to your doctor.

No matter what, it’s important to talk to your doctor and care team about the best way to manage your diabetes and how to handle these situations.

Learn About Tobacco and High Blood Pressure

Tobacco and Your Heart

Tobacco and High Blood Pressure

When you think about the damage tobacco does, you worry about your lungs and mouth. But when you combine tobacco and high blood pressure, it can be hurting you in more ways than you know.

There’s a common belief that chewing tobacco isn’t as bad for you as smoking is, but it can also cause serious health problems. Smokeless tobacco increases your heart rate and blood pressure. Some evidence suggests these products may put you at an increased risk of heart attack or stroke.

Chewing tobacco will still get you hooked on nicotine, the same way cigarettes do. Once you’re addicted, it becomes difficult to stop. Just like with smoking, withdrawals cause intense cravings, make you hungrier, and make you more irritable and depressed.

But the stimulants in all forms of tobacco can have this effect on your blood pressure. The best thing you can do for your heart is quit tobacco completely.

Help Quitting

The first step to quitting is really wanting to quit. These tips can help you get started:

  • Make a list of your reasons for quitting.
  • Set a quit date.
  • List what might stop you from staying tobacco-free. Do you smoke when you’re stressed, hungry, or when you go out with friends?
  • Plan ways to fight it in those moments.
  • Ask family, friends, and your doctor for help.

Our members can also use our Quit For Life program for help . This program helps you break tobacco’s mental and physical hold. You’ll get:

  • One-on-one coaching from a quit coach
  • A quit plan made just for you
  • Helpful tools, like Text2Quit
  • Web Coach®, an online learning and support community

It’s never too late to quit. For more information, visit QuitNow.net or call 1-866-QUIT-4-LIFE (1-866-784-8454).