Tag Archives: milk

National Breastfeeding Month

National Breastfeeding Month

It’s National Breastfeeding Month, and we had more information and tips about breastfeeding for new and expectant moms all week long.

What can breastfeeding do for you and your baby? Learn more.

Why Breastfeed?

 

Everything you need to know about breastfeeding in one handy guide.

Your Guide to Breastfeeding

 

For many women, pumping and storing breast milk is key to going back to work after they have a baby. Learn more about the basics of pumping breast milk.

How to Pump & Store Breastmilk

 

If you’re a new mom, you might not know these surprising facts about nursing your newborn.

Your Newborn and Breastfeeding

 

If you’re struggling to produce milk but still want to breastfeed, these natural ways to boost milk production could help.

If you’re a breastfeeding mom, your diet is still very important! These foods can help you get the nutrients you need.

What You Need for Healthy Breastmilk

 

Natural disasters can be especially hard on you and your baby if you’re breastfeeding. Have a plan in case of emergency.

Planning for Disasters While Breastfeeding

The Smart Processed Foods Choice

Making Sense of Processed Foods

You’ve probably heard in the news that processed foods are bad for you. They’re frequently blamed for high rates of obesity, high blood pressure, and diabetes in America.

But it’s a little more complicated than that. Not all processed foods are bad for you, and it’s important to know which ones you need, which ones can help you save, and which ones to avoid.

What Is Processed Food?

There is a whole range of processed food, and the more processed it is, the less likely it is to be good for you.

Barely processed foods are things that you can find at the store that have been prepped for you for your convenience. These include:

  • Washed and bagged lettuce and spinach
  • Precut or chopped fruit or veggies
  • Roasted nuts

Foods processed at their peak lock in and preserve nutrition, quality, and freshness. These include:

  • Canned tomatoes
  • Frozen fruit and vegetables
  • Canned tuna

Foods with added ingredients may have better flavor and texture, but they can also be worse for you. While these ingredients help preserve quality, they can also have higher sugar, fat, and unnatural additives. These frequently include sweeteners, spices, oils, colors, and preservatives. Foods with added ingredients include:

  • Jarred pasta sauce
  • Salad dressing
  • Yogurt
  • Cake mixes

Ready-to-eat foods are usually heavily processed with lots of added ingredients. These include:

  • Crackers
  • Chips
  • Cookies
  • Granola bars
  • Prepackaged deli meat

Frozen and premade meals are usually the most heavily processed with lots of added ingredients, including salt and preservatives to make them last. These include:

  • Frozen pizza
  • Frozen meals
  • Microwaveable dinners

Positives of Processed Foods

As you can see, some processed foods are good for you. Fresh fruits and veggies that have just been chopped and washed before being packaged really just save you time. (Although you usually have to pay more for that time savings.)

Foods processed at their peak are a great way to save, with the same nutrition at a lower price than fresh.

And some foods with added ingredients are actually better for you. Many kinds of milk and juice have more calcium and vitamin D added in. Some breakfast cereals have added fiber.

Problems with Processed Foods

The 3 biggest problems with processed foods are added sugars, salt, and fat.

Sugars

Sugars aren’t just in candy and prepackaged desserts. They’re added in all kinds of foods, and you may not even know it.

  • Breads can have added sugars to give them a nice brown color.
  • Canned pasta sauce generally has a surprising amount of added sugar.
  • Many cereals are heavily sweetened.
  • Fruit canned in syrup is filled with sugar.

Salt

Salting your food isn’t to blame for high levels of sodium in your diet. 3/4 of the salt you take in comes from processed food.

  • Most canned vegetables, soups, sauces, and beans have added sodium to improve the taste and texture and to help preserve them on the shelf.
  • Premade meals and snacks are full of extra salt to make them taste better and preserve them.

Fats

Added fats make food shelf-stable and tastier. But trans fats in processed foods can raise your bad cholesterol.

Many products with added fats have really small serving sizes, and if you eat more than that, you’re eating a lot of trans fat in one sitting.

For instance, a serving size of Oreos is just 3 cookies, and those 3 cookies have 7 grams of fat, which is 11% of your recommended daily total of fat. Do you actually eat just 3 Oreos in a sitting? Just doubling to 6 cookies puts you over 20% of your daily fat total!

Smart Processed Foods Choices

Now that you know the basics, how can you pick out processed foods that are good for you?

Read Food Labels

  • Look for fortified milk and juice, which have added calcium and vitamins.
  • Avoid things like white bread, which are so refined that most of the healthy fiber has been removed in the processing. Look for whole grain breads, tortillas, and pastas instead.
  • Buy canned fruit packed in water or 100% fruit juice. Avoid fruit packed in syrup and fruit juice concentrate, which have added sugar.
  • Even if a product says it’s organic or all-natural, it can still have added sugar. Too much cane sugar and honey can be just as bad for you as too much corn syrup.
  • Carbohydrates on the nutrition label include naturally occurring sugars, like in yogurt and fruit. Instead, look at the ingredients list to see if sugar has been added. Look for:
    • Sugar
    • Maltose
    • Brown sugar
    • Corn syrup
    • Cane sugar
    • Honey
    • Fruit juice concentrate
  • Check things you might not think you need to for sugar, like cereals, even plain kinds, and pasta sauce.
  • Look for reduced or low sodium on things like canned vegetables, soups, and beans. You can always add a little bit of salt when you’re cooking if you need it.
  • Always rinse canned beans and vegetables, which can lower the salt content by 40%.
  • Even if a product says it has zero trans fat, check the ingredients. If it has any hydrogenated vegetable oils, then it’s going to have some trans fat.

And most importantly, just try to eat heavily processed foods in moderation and make the most of healthier processed foods in a balance with fresh foods.

Up Next:

Making sense of food labels is easy with our handy guide.

Make the most of your next grocery shopping trip to boost your diet and make healthy choices.

Protect Your Health for Dairy Month

Dairy Month

June is Dairy Month. Do you know why you should be getting dairy in your diet?

Calcium in dairy helps build your bones and teeth and prevent breaks.

The Benefits of Dairy

 

Dairy is especially important for kids. It helps build bone mass while they’re young.

Dairy and Your Kids

 

A diet with dairy in it helps reduce your risk of osteoporosis later in life.

Dairy In Your Diet

 

Dairy, especially yogurt and milk, is rich in potassium, which helps with your blood pressure.

A diet with dairy in it helps reduce your risk of cardiovascular disease and high cholesterol.

Yogurt and Milk's Benefits

 

The vitamin D in dairy helps your body maintain calcium and protect your bones.

Building Stronger Bones

 

A diet with dairy in it also helps lower your risk of type 2 diabetes.

Preventing Disease with Dairy

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Avoiding Food Allergies for Food Allergy Awareness Week

Food Allergy Awareness Week 2016

This week is Food Allergy Awareness Week, so we’re bringing you facts about food allergies each day. Learn more.

Food Allergy Breakdown

 

Bodily Reaction

 

Milk and Egg Allergies

 

Allergy Signs and Symptoms

 

Treating a Reaction

 

Cleaning Surfaces

 

Cooking for Those with Food Allergies

 

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Easy, Healthy Food Substitutions

Healthy Food Substitutions

Have you ever run out of something or tried to make your recipes lighter? We can help with easy food substitutions.

You can replace half of the butter in your recipe with tofu or pureed white beans.

Replacing Butter

 

Whip up some healthy whipped cream by using coconut milk.

How to Make Coconut Whipped Cream

 

Never have buttermilk on hand? Replace with lemon juice and regular milk.

Buttermilk Substitution

 

Cut the salt but not the flavor with fresh or dried herbs, spices, citrus juices, or rice vinegar.

Cut the Salt

 

Replace margarine with unsweetened applesauce to cut fat and add Vitamin C.

Avoid Margarine

 

Vegan Marshmallow Fluff is made with the liquid from chickpeas and honey.

Healthy Vegan Marshmallow Fluff – 2 Ingredients

 

Replace sour cream with plain Greek yogurt and increase the recipe’s protein by 88%.

Skipping Sour Cream

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Holiday Cookies That Are Good for You

Healthy Holiday Cookies

This week in food, we had some holiday cookies that will keep you and Santa healthy this holiday season.

These Soft Gingerbread Cookies are the perfect holiday treat for the whole family.

Soft Gingerbread Cookies + A Healthier Christmas Cookie

 

Healthy Chocolate Crinkle Cookies only look rich and decadent.

Chocolate Crinkle Cookies
Image and Recipe via Busy But Healthy

 

These Dark Chocolate Cranberry Oatmeal Cookies are best hot out of the oven with milk.

Dark Chocolate Cranberry Oatmeal Cookies
Image and Recipe via Amy’s Healthy Baking

 

Make these Healthy Ginger Cookies homemade and skip the gingersnaps.

Healthy Ginger Cookies

 

Hot Cocoa Cookies with Vanilla Bean Frosting are perfect for the kids or holiday parties.

Hot Chocolate Cookies
Image and Recipe via Fit Foodie Finds

 

Swedish Almond Cardamom Stars are a great alternative to sugar cookies.

Swedish Almond Cardamom Stars

 

These Ginger-Lemon Pinwheel Cookies are the perfect combo of sweet and spicy.

Ginger-Lemon Pinwheel Cookies

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