Tag Archives: mental illness

Remember Veterans

Covered Bridge: Remember Veterans this Independence Day

Independence Day is almost a whole month away, but I am already looking forward to it because, you guessed it, the food. Barbecued chicken and ribs, potato salad, and deviled eggs, all in the same meal? It’s almost too good to be true. However, the holiday also moves me beyond just my stomach.

While we always have a flag flying, we have a special flag we fly on the Fourth of July. This simple act always reminds me of the many service members who have defended and still are defending our great nation. I have many family members who have served in the military and still currently are. I can only imagine that being in the military is a very challenging experience, so I am thankful there are resources available to military personnel after they serve. One such resource is the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA).

Local veteran service officers can help veterans navigate the many useful programs offered in their area. The resources they offer include help finding employment, starting or continuing an education, or launching a small business. The VA also helps people who are transitioning from active duty to civilian life, which can be a complicated process.

The VA website features an easy-to-navigate section on health topics. Some are of general interests (like cataracts), while others are topics of a specific interest to service members (like readjustment counseling). One of the department’s more pressing challenges is to provide support for homeless veterans or recently discharged service members.

According to the National Coalition for Homeless Veterans, the VA says veterans make up about 11% of the adult homeless population in the U.S. and oftentimes, deal with mental illness and substance abuse.

A local resource is our Wayne County Veterans Office. Our veteran service officer is Pete McDaniel. He is located in the Annex Building and is there Monday through Wednesday from 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. Thursdays are by appointments only. This office provides many great local resources.

I know many of you have served in the military or have friends and family who have served. Reid Health Alliance Medicare thanks all those who have protected this country and have allowed us to continue celebrating Independence Day. This year, I plan on being more about the flag and less about the food.

Morgan Gunder is a community and broker liaison for Reid Health Alliance. Born in the South and raised in the Midwest, she is a wife and mother with a passion for traveling, learning, and technology.

 

Coping with Eating Disorders

Eating Disorders Awareness Week

This week was Eating Disorders Awareness Week, so we gave you facts about the mental illness each day and advice on how to build a healthy relationship with food.

Eating disorders are mental illnesses that cause unhealthy relationships with food, and approximately 24 million people in the U.S. struggle with one. Find help.

Eating Disorders

 

50% of people with eating disorders also suffer from depression, and only 10% of people with them get treatment. Find help.

Depression and Eating Disorders

 

91% of women said they controlled their weight through dieting, and 22% said they dieted “often” or “always.” Find help.

Unhealthy Dieting

 

Men make up 10-15% of those with anorexia and bulimia, but are the least likely to get help. Find help.

Men and Eating Disorders

 

69% of girls ages 10-18 say that models and celebrities in magazines inspired their ideal body shape, and more than 50% of teen girls will smoke, skip meals, fast, or vomit to control their weight. Find help.

Setting Unhealthy Expectations

 

An estimated 25% of college-age girls binge and purge to manage their weight, and 58% say they felt social pressure to maintain a certain size. Find help.

Food Binging

 

Eating disorders have the highest mortality rate of any mental illness. For women ages 15-24, the mortality rate of anorexia is 12 times higher than any other cause of death. Find help.

Death by Eating Disorder

 

First up to building a healthy relationship with food was some advice from Lori Lieberman, a dietitian who works with people suffering from eating disorders. She recommends planning in advance. Even if you don’t prepare food ahead, having a mental plan of what you’re going to eat it can make mealtime easier.

Making a Plan

 

Lieberman also recommends mixing in foods you enjoy but think of as forbidden to avoid overeating and make eating enjoyable. See more of her advice for those rebuilding their relationships with food after eating disorders.

Indulge in "Bad" Foods

 

Focus on healthy fats, like avocado, salmon, and olive oil, which fill you up and are good for you.

Healthy Fats

 

Make sure you and your family eat breakfast! It’s good for you, and improves focus during the morning at school and work. See more tips for helping your kids build a healthy relationship with food.

Healthy Breakfast

 

Drink plenty of water instead of soda, even diet. You could eat a filling snack instead for the number of calories in a can of pop!

Drink More Water

 

Take time to chew your food. Studies show that eating slowly actually makes you feel full sooner. Get more tips.

Chew Your Food!

 

Remember that no food is actually bad. Building a healthy relationship with food, one that lets you have anything in moderation, lets you make healthy choices in any situation. Learn more.

Good Foods Vs. Bad Foods

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Health Education

National Health Education Week

It was National Health Education Week, so we gave you helpful info and resources each day on social media so you could learn more about a variety health subjects.

Did you know Hepatitis B is the most common infectious disease in the world today? Approximately 2 billion people have it. That’s why vaccinations are so important! Learn more.

29.1 million people, 9.3% of the population, have diabetes. 8.1 million people, or 27.8 % of those who have it are undiagnosed. Learn the symptoms and get help today.

Mental illness affect 1 in 4 Americans every year. These conditions are some of the lease covered by media. You can learn more about what you or your loved ones are feeling and going through, and find or give help.

Oral and dental health problems like dry mouth, gum disease, and denture sores can become serious. Yearly dentist visits are important to preventing these. If you think you might be suffering from one of these, you can learn more.

Not getting enough sleep is related to lots of other health problems, and ¼ of Americans don’t get enough. Nearly 10% experience chronic insomnia. Learn more about some of the things that could be hurting your sleep.

187 million adults and 6.8 million children currently suffer from asthma, and people still die from it each year. Learning and being prepared is the key to maintaining your asthma. Take control with these tips from the American Lung Association.

Lung cancer is the leading cancer-killer in the U.S. While tobacco use can be a cause, those who have never used tobacco can still get it. Lung cancer also presents many emotional challenges, including blame. Learn more about the disease and helping.

Mental Illness Awareness Week

Mental Illness Awareness Week

This week on social media, we gave you some staggering facts and information on mental health for Mental Illness Awareness Week and Suicide Prevention Awareness Month.

  • 1 in 4 adults, 61.5 million Americans, experiences mental illness in a given year. One in 17, about 13.6 million, live with a serious illness such as schizophrenia, depression, or bipolar disorder. With statistics like those, you probably know someone suffering.
  • Approximately 20% of kids ages 13-18 experience severe mental disorders in a given year.
  • 70% of the youths in juvenile justice systems have at least one mental health condition, and 20% live with a severe mental illness.
  • Approximately 1.1% of American adults, or 6.1 million people, live with bipolar disorder.
  • Approximately 6.7% of American adults, or about 14.8 million people, live with major depression.
  • 18.1% of American adults, or 42 million people live with anxiety disorders such as panic disorder, OCD, PTSD, and phobias.
  • About 9.2 million adults have reoccurring mental health and addiction disorders.
  • 26% of homeless adults live with serious mental illness, and 46% live with severe mental illness and/or substance abuse disorders.
  • Approximately 20% of state prisoners and 21% of local jail prisoners have a “recent history” of mental health conditions.
  • Approximately 60% percent of adults and half the youth with a mental illness got no help for it in the last year.
  • Mood disorders like depression are the 3rd most common cause of hospitalization in the U.S. for both youths and adults.
  • Serious mental illness costs America $193.2 billion in lost earnings per year.
  • Suicide is the 10th leading cause of death in the U.S. above homicide, and the 3rd leading cause of death for ages 15 to 24.
  • Military members are less than 1% of the population, but vets represent 20% of suicide. Each day 22 vets die from suicide.

You can help, and you can get help.

Hoarding Warning Signs

Warning Signs of Hoarding

What Is Hoarding?

Lately, it seems like almost every cable TV channel has a show about hoarding and people who live in less-than-great conditions because they can’t let go of anything, even trash.

While these people represent extreme cases, even mild hoarding can be a problem. As we get older, we tend to hang onto things. This often creates dangerous living areas, especially for seniors who have issues with balance and falling.

Clutter can also lead to other problems. It makes it harder to keep track of things you need like bills, meds, keys, and contact info for your friends and loved ones.

People with hoarding disorders usually save things because they believe these things will be needed in the future, they have emotional significance, and because having these things makes them feel safer and more secure. Because of this, it’s very different than collecting, when people careful find and display special items, like stamps or model cars.

Hoarding animals is one of the most dangerous forms of hoarding. Pets in these situations often aren’t cared for properly, which is dangerous for them and for you because of the unsanitary conditions this can lead to.

Signs of Hoarding

    • Cluttered living spaces, especially when it stops you from being able to use rooms for their intended purposes, like not being able to cook in the kitchen.
    • Extreme attachment to unimportant objects.
    • Letting trash build up to an unhealthy level.
    • Keeping stacks of newspapers and junk mail, or collecting lots of useless items.
    • Moving items from one pile to another without ever throwing anything away.
    • Trouble making decisions about and organizing your stuff.
    • Having a hard time letting others touch or borrow your things.
    • Embarrassment over your home.
    • Limited social interactions.

Getting Help

But hoarding is a treatable mental illness. Therapy where you talk with a doctor and certain drugs, usually ones used for depression, can help. Sticking to a treatment plan made with your doctor and support groups can also help you avoid hoarding.

You can also get help cleaning out your home with organizers, local assistance, or your friends and family. And you may find you have a lot of great things that you could donate to make someone else’s life better.

If hoarding affects you or someone you love, talk to your doctor as soon as possible. They can help you find a therapist who can work with you to make a treatment plan and recommend resources to help you clean up the clutter.