Tag Archives: long term effects

Mental Health Month

Mental Health Month

May is Mental Health Month, and we’re talking about some important mental health issues facing Americans all week.

Being exposed to violence or trauma as a kid can have long-term effects, from derailing development to increased mental and physical issues. Long or repeated stress can be toxic for kids, especially if they’re lacking adult support in their lives.

Childhood Trauma

 

Adverse childhood experiences can include emotional, physical, or sexual abuse, community violence, household addiction, parents divorcing, poverty, and bullying. Know the signs to help the children in your life.

Signs of Childhood Problems

 

Taking care of your mental health in college is especially important. 1 in 5 young adults experience a mental health condition, and 75% of those begin by 24 with many emerging in the college years.

Mental health issues affect students’ success at college. College can be difficult and isolating, and 45% have felt that things were hopeless at some point. Over 45% of those who stop attending could benefit from mental health support.

Support in College During Isolation

 

Only 1 in 3 of the people who need mental health help actually seek it out, even though treatments for the most common conditions are effective 80% of the time. It’s also the leading cause of disability in the U.S.

Mental Health and Work

 

In the wake of the opioid crisis, it’s important to understand how it affects mental health. Over time, addiction changes brain function, inhibiting a person’s ability to control substance use.

Brain Function and Opioids

 

Long-term use of opioids can cause a chronic brain disorder, which causes problems with the brain reward system, motivation, memory, and related circuitry. Encourage loved ones to see a doctor to explore treatment center options.

Recovering from Addiction
National Epilepsy Month

National Epilepsy Month

November was also National Epilepsy Month.

Epilepsy is a chronic disorder where you have regular seizures, sometimes more than one kind. While seizures may affect the whole body, the electrical events that cause them start in the brain. Where it starts, how it spreads, and how much of the brain is affected can all have long term effects.

Sometimes, people with epilepsy have similar EEG tests, clinical history, and family history, and their conditions are usually a specific epilepsy syndrome. Besides the physical effects on your body and brain, epilepsy can also affect your physical safety, your ability to drive and work, and even your relationships.

Seizures are more common than you might realize.

Did You Know: 

1 in 26 Americans will develop epilepsy in their lifetime
4th most common neurological disorder
1 in 10 people will have a seizure during their lifetime
65 million

 

Connect with people who have epilepsy and great resources on Living Well with Epilepsy.

Do you know what to do if someone is having a seizure? Learn more.

Seizure First Aid

Stay with the person
Time the seizure
Protect rom injury
Loosen anything tight around the neck
Do not restrain the person
Do not put anything in the mouth
Roll the person on their side as the seizure subsides
After the seizure talk to the person reassuringly