Tag Archives: lives

Sharing Personal Histories

Vantage Point: The Importance of Our Personal Histories

Recently, I was sitting at a local senior center, talking to several retirees. I asked what professions they were in prior to their retirement, and one gentleman’s answer struck me hard.

He said he was a cartographer, or map maker, but that his skill and history were no longer relevant. I found this most interesting and asked him to give me an idea of what his job was like.

He started to tell me and then said, “But I am no longer relevant to this day and time due to technology.” My first reaction was pure shock and then sadness. This man, who had worked more than 30 years as a cartographer, thinks that he is no longer relevant.

Many of us sitting at the table found this to be the most interesting profession of everyone in the conversation. And as he started to tell us what he did in his job, I could only think how awesome it would be for our younger generation to hear his story.

As he finished up his story, I asked him why he thinks he’s not relevant anymore. He said, with today’s technology, few humans are needed in the creation of maps since they have drones and computers now to do what he and others did “back in the day.”

I reminded him that his history and knowledge were valuable and needed by our younger generations. The skillset needed for his job when technology was scarce needs to be heard. The history of cartographers is still vital and very important, even with the advanced technology that we have.

Everyone at the table agreed with me and joined in my admiration of his profession and knowledge.

Through my work, I have met teachers, chefs, firefighters, coaches, doctors, and now a cartographer. They all have great stories infused with history, skill, and knowledge. It’s also obvious that they loved what they did and want to share their story.

Remembering that we all have value in every part of our lives is important, whether it’s when we are young and working, or when we get older and retire. Our histories are relevant no matter where we are in our lives, and they need to be shared, remembered, and heard by all.

Joy Stanford is a community liaison with Health Alliance, serving Thurston County. She’s been involved with Medicare for 20+ years and truly enjoys it. She enjoys gospel, R&B, and country music, and she owns over 100 pairs of shoes.

World Immunization Week

World Immunization Week

This year’s World Immunization Week goal was to close the immunization gap around the world, so we had more info daily

Vaccines save between 2 and 3 million lives each year. The first and most important thing you can do is make sure your family is up-to-date.

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This week is also the 20th anniversary National Infant Immunization Week to raise awareness about protecting kids from vaccine preventable diseases. Are your kids up-to-date?

Boy Getting Shot

 

16% of kids around the world aren’t being vaccinated against measles, which lets outbreaks happen. Learn more about why we need vaccines.

Doctor vaccinating small redhead girl.

 

See rates of vaccination for different diseases around the world and learn about where needs help.

Administration of drugs

 

Do you know the myths about #vaccines? Learn more about why they matter and protect your family.

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What programs are we supporting around the world? Learn more about how the CDC is helping.

25 diseases can be prevented by vaccines, and measles deaths dropped 78% as the vaccine spread around the world. Learn more.

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Learning About Your Family's Diabetes

Around the Web: You and Your Family’s Diabetes

According to the American Diabetes Association (ADA), in 2012, 29.1 million people had diabetes, and 8.1 million of them didn’t even know they had it. Managing you and your family’s diabetes can be a challenge.

Sometimes, you don’t realize the reach the disease can have on your health and your lives.

Diabetes Guides

These visual guides can help you understand the difference between type 1 diabetes and type 2 diabetes.

Your diabetes can affect your feet,  eyes, and mouth. These guides tell you how diabetes affects them, and ways to prevent problems.

Controlling your blood sugar through an insulin-based treatment plan can be tricky, but these tips can help.

Your blood sugar can also swing for reasons other than what you eat, so awareness is key.

When you’re first diagnosed, insulin injections can be a scary part of dealing with your diabetes. This guide can help walk you through the process.

You can also check out the YouTube video playlist Diabetes Basics from the ADA to learn more about how diabetes works and ways to protect yourself.

Your Family’s Diabetes

Of the 9.3% of the U.S. population who has diabetes, about 208,000 people are under age 20. And when you’re still growing up, the age difference can change the affects, both physically and emotionally.

The ADA’s page For Parents and Kids is a great place to start as you explore your child’s diabetes. Be Healthy Today; Be Healthy for Life is also an in-depth resource for kids and their families about living with type 2 diabetes.

The National Diabetes Education Program also has these PDFs of helpful info and tips written specifically for teens and their needs:

The ADA also has a page, Everyday Life, that helps you find resources to help your kids live with diabetes through all the stages and events of life. Topics include leaving them with babysitters, telling others, playing sports, and even parties, dating, and driving.

Their YouTube channel also has a playlist of videos to help you make sure your kids are Safe at School.

For additional resources and ways we can help, visit us online and join our Diabetes Disease Management program.

Protecting Your Baby with Vaccines

The Importance of Vaccines: Myths vs. Facts

A little boy in Germany has died, the first death in the current measles outbreak. While people take sides about vaccines in the news and politics, the medical world’s feelings are clear.

Vaccines, or immunizations, are a time-tested and scientifically proven way to prevent certain diseases to protect your kids and our society.

What are vaccines?

Vaccines, immunizations, or shots are kinds of drugs you can take to help your immune system. Inside your body, they act like the diseases they’re supposed to prevent and trick your body into producing the kinds of cells it needs to fight a certain disease. By doing this, vaccines teach your body how to beat real infections when they happen.

When enough people are vaccinated, 90 to 95% of the population, it is enough to protect everyone, which helps get rid of diseases altogether.

Inoculation, an early form of vaccines, has been saving lives since the year 1000 in China. And waves of diseases and struggles to find treatments and cures across history have shown that sometimes, vaccines are our first and best form of protection.

Get more history on vaccines and the diseases they fight with this project from The College of Physicians of Philadelphia, The History of Vaccines.  

How well do they work?

Some of the scariest and most painful diseases to ever exist have been nearly wiped out by vaccination. And smallpox, one of the deadliest diseases, has been completely wiped out around the world. By doing so, according to Unicef, we’ve saved approximately 5 million lives each year.

And other diseases, like polio, have been close to being wiped out, too.

According to data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), more than a dozen of the most deadly sicknesses humans have ever seen have been nearly wiped out in the last 200 years since vaccines were made. This infographic from Leon Farrant, also shared in this ThinkProgress article on vaccines, shows their power:

ThinkProgress Vaccine Infographic

Still not convinced? The Wall Street Journal can visually show you the data piece by piece for some of the main diseases your doctor vaccinates you against.

If they work so well, why are we even talking about them?

Diseases that we hadn’t seen much in the last few years, like measles, are making a comeback.

Those diseases are coming back because parents aren’t vaccinating their kids as much as they used to. And once the population falls below that 90 to 95% vaccination rate, those diseases are able to come back. And even with modern medicine, you can still die from them.

So why are parents taking that risk? Because of an old medical study that has been discredited, says The New York Times.

In 1998, a doctor said that he had linked the measles, mumps, rubella (M.M.R.) vaccine and autism in children.

Dozens of scientists and studies proved his work wrong, saying his research was bad since he’d only studied 12 kids, which is a tiny sample when doing scientific research. The British medical authorities even took away his medical license.

This is the only time a link has ever been made between vaccines and autism, and scientists and the medical field proved it wasn’t true. As this Guardian article talks about, later research studies have even made a lot of data disproving a link between the MMR vaccine and autism. Yet the story stuck.

People also worry that vaccines are just being produced by a big company to make money, not to protect patients. But as this New York Times article points out, many doctors lose money by giving you vaccines, and historically, many makers of them have made very little money off them.

As Newsweek points out, some statistics have also been skewed in a negative way. The CDC keeps a database of adverse effects from vaccines, which it’s required to do by law. Since 2004, 69 people have died after getting a measles vaccine. However, not necessarily because of the vaccine. In some cases, their death was completely unrelated, but the reporting system just gives the cold, hard numbers, not the cause-and-effect relationship between patients’ deaths and the vaccine. Numbers like these are sometimes used to convince people that vaccines are dangerous.

But the fact is that vaccines save many lives around the world. According to the World Health Organization (WHO), the measles vaccine alone has saved 15.6 million lives between 2000 and 2016.

The government, your insurance companies, doctors, and pharmacies make vaccines affordable and easy to get for one reason and one reason only: to save lives.

Don’t risk your family or your community. Health Alliance covers immunizations for our members, and we can help you stay up-to-date.

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Family Memories

Long View: Find Your Family Legacy

My mom and Aunt Winona were riding in my car, discussing the latest family birth, when I asked them each what hospital they were born in. They both laughed and said they were born at home.

When I asked them who helped my grandmother with the birth, they told me their Grandma (Lucy) Smith was there. “Grandma Smith was a very well-known midwife in the area and even helped deliver Omar Bradley.”

I said “What? Wait. Do you mean Omar Bradley, the famous Five-Star General?”

My mom said, “Yes, and she was very proud of it.”

This prompted me to do an Internet search and gather some family history to learn more. Lucy Belle Carter, my great-grandmother, was born in 1860 in Moberly, MO. She married John O. Smith in 1878 and moved to Renick, MO, where she gave birth to six children; the last surviving child, my grandmother, was born in 1898.

Omar Bradley was born near Clark, MO, in 1893, the son of John Smith Bradley and Mary Elizabeth Hubbard. The distance from Renick to Clark is 7 miles. My great-grandmother Lucy was 33 years old at the time of Omar’s birth and had four children of her own by then. The math and the geography make Lucy’s involvement in Omar’s birth feasible. Very interesting.

I know many of you probably do not know who Omar Bradley is, but he is definitely worth a Google. The point is a random question gave me a glimpse into my family’s history that I would have never known about otherwise. More discussion focused on the many changes my mother and aunt have witnessed in their lives. I remember when there were no color televisions. They remember when there were no televisions, and record players came with a crank. That’s quite a span of human development.

Encouraging your family members to share stories becomes their legacy to future generations. Without a little effort, these experiences could be lost or forgotten. Patience and a few open-ended questions can be rewarded by an insight into a fascinating family story or encounter. With a little encouragement, I might tell you why my brother and I were featured in a full-page picture in our local paper when we were kids … or the time I was introduced to Miss America at a car show in Pittsburg. Maybe in another column.

Work Up a Sweat with a Workout Buddy

Sweat Glands Work Better in Pairs

There’s something special about being part of a group. Spoken or unspoken, you rest easier knowing, “We’re in this together.”

You experience that feeling when you exercise in groups, too. Research shows those who sweat socially, like with a workout buddy, are more likely to stick with their fitness plan and see success.

In a Baylor University study, after teaching 53 female college students a specific weight-training workout, the researchers told them to do it on their own 3-days a week for 6 weeks.

Can you guess what happened? Every single one of them quit the study.

A workout buddy doesn’t guarantee success, but it makes success more likely, a review of 87 studies on 50,000 people found this link to be clea).

Still not convinced? Here are 5 more reasons to think about grabbing a friend and workout buddy before hitting the gym:

  1. Time flies. This isn’t to say your 60-minute workout will be easy, but instead of constantly watching the clock, you can catch up on each other’s lives between sets, laugh, and have fun.
  2. No more Debbie Downer. Who likes canceling plans with a friend? If your workout partner is counting on you to be there, you’ll be less likely to bail.
  3. Share a babysitter. If your gym doesn’t have a kid center, share the cost of a sitter.
  4. Keep perspective. Most of us are hard on ourselves. When you have workout buddies, they can help you see your progress and remind you of how far you’ve come.
  5. Stay on track. Not only do friends help you see how far you’ve come, they also keep you thinner. Harvard University researchers found that a person’s risk of becoming obese goes up by 2% for every 5 obese friends or family members he or she has. Yikes!

Give social sweating a try, and let us know what you think.

And if you’re looking for a gym to join, check out our Fitness Discounts section.