Tag Archives: late

Fresh Fiddlehead Ferns at Your Farmers Market

Making the Most of a Farmers Market

There are lots of reasons to get out to your local farmers market, but going to a farmers market for the first time is very different than going to the supermarket. We can help make sure it goes smoothly with these tips from a farmers market veteran:

1. Prepare.

  • Illinois has a Senior Farmers Market Nutrition Program that gives you a free booklet of checks that you can use at local markets. Check it out on the Illinois Department on Aging’s site for details and participating counties and markets .
  • Many vendors only take cash (and some take SNAP and WIC benefits). Some booths only take small bills, 20s and smaller.
  • Many vendors don’t offer bags, so it’s a good idea to bring a few cloth ones you can use.
  • Most markets don’t allow dogs, so leave them at home.
  • Have an idea of what is in stock at that time of year, so you know what to expect. Use this map to find out what’s in season where you live.

2. Check the info booth first. If your market has an info booth, check there before you start shopping. The people working can let you know if there are any special things going on that day, like cooking demos.

Certain markets, like the new Champaign Farmers’ Market downtown, have special deals for SNAP users, so it’s always good to check with the info booth. At their market, they will double up to $20 of benefits per person while funds last when you bring your Link card to the market booth!

3. Go early or go late. If you go early, you will have first pick of the freshest and largest selection. If you go late, some farmers will offer discounts to clear out their stock before heading home.

4. Take a lap. Unless you know your market really well, don’t just buy the first things you see. By walking a lap through the market first, you can get the lay of the land, compare prices and selection, and taste samples.

5. Talk to the farmers. The farmers can answer questions about how the food was grown and harvested, talk about why their produce is or is not organic, offer recipes, give info about something you’ve never tasted, or recommend their favorites.

6. Be mindful. It’s considered rude to squeeze stone fruits, like peaches, plums, or tomatoes, because it can bruise them. And it’s considered rude to open husks of corn before buying them, which can actually make them less sweet. Also, look for whole produce, meaning veggies like carrots and beets with their green tops still whole. These will stay fresh longer, and you can make things like pesto sauces with the greens.

7. Take a risk. Sometimes you find things that are new, different, or even strange at the farmer’s market. This is the perfect opportunity to try something new because the farmers can usually give you advice on how best to use it.

8. Bring a friend or the family. Grocery shopping, unlike the farmers market, can feel like a chore. Take people with you to talk and walk with outside, and the farmer’s market instantly becomes a more fun activity. And you can always save money and split certain produce.

9. Keep it simple. When you’re cooking your food at home, go for simple recipes. Because you bought such fresh produce, you should let it shine. Put fresh wild strawberries over a salad or in a breakfast parfait instead of baking them into a cake. If you’re worried you won’t be able to use all of something you bought you can always freeze it and use the rest later. Use this guide from the FDA to make sure you’re storing and washing produce correctly.

10. Find the right market. Many areas have more than one farmers market within driving distance. If you can, test them all. Large farmer’s markets have a lot of energy, selection, and sometimes even dining options, but smaller markets often have good deals. Find the one that works best for you.

Find farmer’s markets near you. Learn more about which ones take SNAP and WIC, or check out this list of all the farmer’s markets that take Illinois Link Benefits.

Up Next:

Do you really understand what you’re getting when you buy organic? We break it down in Organic 101.

And make sure you’re cleaning your fresh fruits and veggies the right way to keep your family safe.

Last Chance

Your Last Chance

It’s the last week of Medicare’s Annual Enrollment Period (AEP), which ends on December 7, and your last chance to get covered!

Don’t let it pass you by. We can cut through confusion and questions to help you get covered today.

Call 1-888-382-9771 (TTY 711) from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. weekdays. Or visit HealthAllianceMedicare.org for more info.

Health Alliance Medicare is an HMO, PPO, and PDP plan with a Medicare contract. Enrollment depends on contract renewal. You must continue to pay your Part B premium. Low-cost prescriptions are available at other in-network pharmacies. The benefit information here is just a brief summary, not a complete description of benefits. Limitations, copayments, and restrictions may apply. Benefits, formulary, pharmacy network, premium, and/or copayments/coinsurance may change on January 1 of each year.

ADHD - Like Changing Channels

Can Adults Have ADHD?

Remember that boy in second grade? The one who couldn’t sit still? Who the teacher was always disciplining for not listening and distracting others? Chances are, he had Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD).

If so, chances are also good that ADHD is still a part of his everyday life.

Most people don’t outgrow ADHD. The good news? Once the disorder’s been recognized and treated, adults can learn to adapt. When managed with the appropriate combo of meds, therapy, education, and support, adults lead productive and successful lives.

Doctors once thought that ADHD only affected children, and boys, twice as much as girls. Now, we know that its symptoms continue into adulthood for about 60% of those kids. That’s about 4% of the U.S. adult population, or 8 million adults. Because ADHD is likely a genetic, inherited disorder, adults are often diagnosed when their son or daughter is.

You may have been un-diagnosed as a kid if:

  • School report cards showed comments about behavior problems, poor focus, lack of effort, or underachievement.
  • Teachers brought up behavioral issues with your parents.
  • You had problems with peers, bed wetting, school failure, or suspensions.

ADHD affects the prefrontal cortex of the brain, the part of the brain which lets us control thoughts and actions. Its symptoms include being:

    • Easily distracted
    • Forgetful
    • Disorganized
    • Restless
    • Reckless
    • Careless

And these symptoms can cause further struggles, like:

  • Lateness
  • Anxiety
  • Mood swings
  • Anger problems
  • Depression
  • Low self-esteem
  • Impulsiveness
  • Substance abuse or addiction
  • Procrastination
  • Frustration
  • Boredom
  • Trouble concentrating with reading and listening

Adults with untreated ADHD have trouble following directions, planning ahead, and finishing work on deadline. When not managed, this can lead to job loss and unhealthy relationships.

Talk to your doctor today if you think you or your child have ADHD.