Tag Archives: kids

Children’s Vision and Learning Month

Children’s Vision and Learning Month

It’s Children’s Vision and Learning Month, and you’d be surprised how important vision can be to learning.

1 in 10 children have a vision problem significant enough to affect their ability to learn.

Children's Vision and Learning

 

20/20 vision means you can see at a distance, but it doesn’t mean a child can focus, coordinate, and track with their eyes, which can impact their performance in school.

Vision and Focus at School

 

Children with vision problems can be misdiagnosed with ADHD because they have poor reading comprehension, skip or reread lines, take longer to do school work, or show a short attention span.

Mistaken ADHD Diagnoses Based on Vision Issues

 

Teaching your kids skills like using scissors, drawing, painting, and handwriting before school can help them establish hand-eye coordination, be ahead in school, and help you spot potential eye problems.

Teaching Hand-Eye Coordination

 

School vision screenings provide less than 4% of the eye tests needed to help kids see, and they can miss up to 75% of vision problems.

School Vision Screenings

 

61% of children who were found to have eye problems through school screenings are never taken to the doctor to get help.

Going to the Eye Doctor

 

Yearly comprehensive vision exams with an eye doctor are the best way to protect your child’s sight and make sure they’re prepared to learn at school.

Exercise with Your Child Week

Exercise with Your Child Week

It’s Exercise with Your Child Week, and we can help your family get moving all week.

How much exercise do your kids really need at different ages? 

How Much Exercise Do Kids Need?

 

If you’re trying to squeeze in a quick workout with your kids, here are 10 exercises you can all do together.

How to Exercise At Home with Kids

 

Dad can make playing with the kids a workout with these exercises from Men’s Health.

Playing as a Workout

 

Balance time spent on sedentary play, like reading books and playing with toys, with play that requires physical activity, like tag, hide and seek, and hopscotch.

Make Time for Active Play

 

Set aside daily time for active movement together, maybe it’s swimming at the pool in the summer, walking the dog, or playing catch.

Daily Time for Movement

 

Instead of going to the movies, pick family activities that get you moving, like bowling, mini golf, or laser tag.

Get Moving for Family Night

 

Have weekly sports nights where you use a set of exercise cards, play lawn games (like shuffleboard, bags, or badminton), or even get moving with physically active video games.

Competition with the Family

Get Ready for Kindergarten Month

Get Ready for Kindergarten Month

August is Get Ready for Kindergarten Month! The first thing to do to make sure your little one is ready to start school is to check out our Summer Health Checklist.

Summer Health Checklist

 

Double-check which shots your little one needs before they start kindergarten.

Your Children’s Preventive Care and Physicals

 

Make sure they’ve had their annual physical before they start. What happens at their next annual well-child appointment? We can help.

Well-Child Visits – Ages 5 to 10

 

Read books with your child to help them get ready for their first day of school.

Read About Kindergarten

 

Walk your child by the school, play on the playground, and if possible, give them a tour to make them feel more secure.

Tour the School

 

Plan their sleep schedule ahead of time so they’ll be adjusted to their new morning schedule for school.

Adjust Their Sleep Schedule

 

If you can, take a practice bus trip or walk through their morning trip with them so they’re ready on the first day of school to tackle getting there.

Practice the Bus Trip

National Child-Centered Divorce Month

National Child-Centered Divorce Month

July is National Child-Centered Divorce Month. Thinking about your kids if you’re going through a divorce doesn’t mean staying together for their sake. It just means you’re considering their feelings and emotions while making choices.

Considering Your Kids During Divorce

 

If you’re getting a divorce, take the time to sit down together with your kids and explain the decision whenever possible. Presenting a unified front, even at this difficult time, is important for your family.

Discussing the Decision as a Family

 

Put yourself in your children’s shoes and validate their feelings while handling a divorce. They have a right to have feelings about the situation and to express them.

Safely Expressing Feelings During Divorce

 

Remind your kids that they’re not at fault or a cause of the divorce, and reassure them at each step that mom and dad will always be their parents. 

Don’t ask them to take sides or put them in the middle of arguments. Make sure they feel comfortable loving both of you and talking about it.

Avoiding Putting Your Kids in the Middle

 

Focus on change and not blame. Help them understand the changes that are coming to all of your lives and how you’ll work through it together. 

Focusing on Change as a Positive

 

Be confident and consistent when discussing the divorce with them. You should both decide on how you’ll handle issues with the kids upfront and be ready to communicate with them about these issues consistently.

Consistency During Divorce

Kids and Energy to Burn

Long View: Energy to Burn

I tried to talk my parents into buying me a paddle boat when I was 11. Oh yes, I did.

We used to spend the summer on a little island at the south end of Mobile Bay in Alabama. The first thing my younger brother and I wanted to do when we got there was to go to the concession stand and rent paddle boats. For those of you who are not familiar, they are kind of like riding a bike but on the water, seriously.

The rental was kind of expensive as I remember, but the folks let us ride as many times as we wanted. My idea of buying one to save on the rental just didn’t float with Mom and Dad.

The following year, we discovered the paddle boat concession had been wiped out by a hurricane. We were inconsolable until our Dad presented us with 4 new Frisbees. We got the neighbor kids out on the beach and played for what seemed like hours. When the inevitable boredom set in, we often walked to historic Fort Gaines on the far eastern end of the island. There were lots of walls to climb and ramparts to scramble up. It was like a huge jungle gym. The fort had real cannons too.  Signs discouraged people from climbing on them, but we did it just the same.

After supper, the family often walked to the western end of the island, which was quite a jaunt for our little legs, especially in the sand. By the time we got back to the house, we were ready for a well-deserved night’s sleep.

It took me a while to realize that my parents were geniuses. They knew how to engage their 2 somewhat hyperactive boys and make sure we burned off enough energy to settle down in the evening. Sometimes we volunteered to go to bed early, which gave the folks a much-deserved rest.

When I talk to people who are older and wiser than me, I keep in mind they probably have insights and wisdom far beyond my own. Giving an older friend or family member a chance to share their insights is our chance to learn from someone else’s experience.  My parents might not have been geniuses, but they were most certainly practical and insightful when it came to raising kids.

I recently checked out the cost of a paddle boat, with an awning of course. It was affordable. However, I realized what a wildly impractical purchase it would be, so I bought a Frisbee instead. Lesson learned.

Patrick Harness is a community liaison with a long history of experience in health insurance. He is known for his inability to parallel park, and if you ask him to pick a color, he always chooses orange, (and he paints!)

Essential Summer Safety Tips

Essential Summer Safety Tips

The summer season is finally here! But as we start to enjoy the outdoors and more adventurous activities, hospitals and urgent care facilities are bracing themselves for “trauma season” as they call it in the healthcare industry. 

Emergency rooms usually see injuries and traumas double in the summer compared to the winter months. The most common causes of injuries during the summer include car accidents, severe sunburns, water-sports injuries, dehydration, heat exhaustion, and falls.

But many of these can easily be avoided by following these essential summer safety tips that will keep you and your family safe and healthy during the summer months.

WaterTo avoid dehydration, drink plenty of water or beverages high in electrolytes. Avoid drinking too much alcohol or caffeine, both of which actually make your system lose water. Eat fruits and vegetables which contain a lot of water like grapefruits, peaches, eggplants, and spinach.

Sun ProtectionTo avoid sunburns, apply sunscreen with an at least SPF 30 and make sure you’re using a waterproof formula if you’re swimming. Stay in the shade from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m., cover your skin, and wear a hat if you’re exposed. Keep children in the shade as much as possible.

Heat ProtectionTo avoid heat exhaustion and heatstroke, don’t engage in physical activities during the hottest hours of the day. Get acclimated to the hot weather by slowly increasing the amount of time you spend outside.

Water SafetyTo avoid water-related injuries, always bring a buddy along while participating in water sports and follow the lifeguards’ instructions. Take time to get used to the difference in temperature between in and out of the water. Don’t drink alcohol before water activities.

Car SafetyTo reduce the risk of car accidents, make sure all your car maintenance is done before you leave on a trip. Allow plenty of time to arrive and try to drive during off-peak hours. Stop and take breaks every 100 miles or 2 hours, and if possible, take turns with a passenger.

 

Sometimes accidents, illnesses, and injuries cannot be avoided, even for the most careful traveler. If you find yourself injured or sick, remember that our travel emergency partner, Assist America is here to help. 

You can download the free Assist America Mobile App to access your membership details, membership ID card, list of services, or to call the 24/7 Operations Center with the tap of a button.

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App Store is a service mark of Apple Inc., registered in the U.S. and other countries. Google Play and the Google Play logo are trademarks of Google LLC.

National Children’s Awareness Month

National Children’s Awareness Month

June is National Children’s Awareness Month and the perfect time to talk about child abuse and neglect.

Child abuse is any act that results in serious harm or risk of harm to children, including physical violence, exploitation, and death. Failure to take action to stop this is also considered child abuse.

Child neglect is when a child isn’t provided basic needs like food, clean clothing, and medical care.

Child Neglect Signs

 

A report of child abuse is made every 10 seconds, and 91% of child abuse is committed by parents.

Reporting Child Abuse

 

4 to 5 children die from abuse or neglect every day in the U.S., and 75% of these children are under the age of 3 years old.

The Risk of Child Neglect

 

Children often can’t speak up to protect themselves from abuse. Some physical signs of abuse include visible and severe injuries, like bruises, sprains, and burns that aren’t easily explained.

Protecting Kids from Abuse

 

Children who avoid or fear situations or a certain person in their life and who have extreme behavior, nightmares, and difficulty expressing their thoughts and feelings may be experiencing abuse.

Signs in Children's Behavior

 

If you know kids with low self-esteem, who have strong shame or guilt, or who have slowed development mentally, physically, or emotionally, they may be experiencing child abuse.

Development in Child Abuse Survivors

 

If you suspect child abuse or neglect, contact your state’s agency for help.