Tag Archives: insomnia

Caffeine Awareness Month

Caffeine Awareness Month

It’s Caffeine Awareness Month, and we’ll have tips to help you make sure you’re using caffeine safely.

Caffeine is usually safe for adults, but pregnant women shouldn’t use it, and children should avoid it.

Up to 400 mg of caffeine a day is usually safe for healthy adults. That’s about 4 cups of brewed coffee, 10 cans of cola, or 2 energy shots.

How Much Caffeine is Safe?

 

While the caffeine in 10 cans of cola is still at a safe limit, it would have over 90 teaspoons of sugar. You should be shooting for no more than 6 teaspoons of sugar a day. Be aware of the sugar you take in with your caffeine.

Watching Sugar with Caffeine

 

Avoid mixing caffeine with other substances like alcohol. Their effects can compound each another, making them more dangerous.

Avoid Mixing Caffeine

 

You may want to cut back on caffeine if you’re experiencing side effects like migraines, insomnia, nervousness and restlessness, a fast or uneven heatbeat, or jittery muscle tremors.

Side Effects of Caffeine

 

Caffeine usually takes an effect on most people within 15 to 45 minutes, so don’t drink more just because you don’t immediately feel its effects.

Caffeine Takes Effect

 

Caffeine isn’t safe for dogs, so don’t let them get into chocolate or caffeinated drinks.

Caffeine and Dogs

Sleep Awareness

Sleep Awareness Week

This week is Sleep Awareness Week, just in time for the Daylight Savings Time change, so we will be giving you tips and info about getting a healthy amount of sleep each day.

Approximately 30% of Americans suffer from some insomnia symptoms, and 10% have issues functioning during the day because of it.

37 million people regularly snore, and many who snore have sleep apnea, where they stop breathing while sleeping. Sleep apnea hurts your daytime activity and is tied to more serious health problems.

Living with Snoring

 

Try keeping a sleep diary to monitor how well you sleep. This will be especially helpful if you visit a doctor for the problem. Devices like a Fitbit also keep detailed info on your sleep patterns.

Keeping a Sleep Diary

 

Stop drinking caffeine 4 to 6 hours before bed to fall asleep more easily.

Cutting Back Caffeine for Better Sleep

 

Don’t exercise 3 hours or less before bed. Exercise wakes up your system and can make it hard to fall asleep.

Exercise and Your Bedtime

 

If you have trouble sleeping, wind down before bed with calming activities, like taking a relaxing bath or reading.

Relaxing to Sleep Better

 

Turn off devices at least an hour before you go to sleep. The light from your TV, phone, and tablet screens can mess with the hormones that help you sleep. Machines and apps that recreate sounds like rain can make noise without the light.

Turning Off Devices

Save

Sleep for the Whole Family

Long View: Take Time to Rest Easy, Don’t Skip Sleep

I know we all think about ways to carve out more time in our busy lives, and I’m sure we’d all like to be more efficient. Sometimes I think getting by on less sleep is the way to go, but after looking into it, there are some problems with that solution.

There are lots of reasons you might not get enough sleep—illness, stress, family commitments, and job issues. Bad sleep habits, like irregular schedules and eating too much before bed, can lead to insomnia whether or not you’re actually trying to skip sleep. The causes of a bad night’s sleep seem endless, and so do the effects. But your primary care doctor can get you started on the right path to better sleep.

I can’t close my eyes to the fact that my sleep habits aren’t always the best, but I try to maintain a regular schedule. Typically, I read a few pages from a book with a serene topic before I drift off. For a while, I was concerned about afternoon drowsiness until I was able to tie the symptoms to carb loading at lunch. I also took a medicine that had vivid dreams as a possible side effect. My dreams are vivid enough as is. The medicine made them unbearable, so my doctor and I decided we would take another path.

My friend Karen Stefaniak is our wellness program administrator here at Health Alliance. She shared her knowledge on sleep.

“Recent studies are linking reduced sleep duration—five hours or less—to weight gain,” Stefaniak says. “Not getting enough sleep affects the two hormones that tell us when to eat and when to stop eating. People who are sleep-deprived produce more ghrelin, the hormone that tells us when to eat, and less leptin, the hormone that tells us when to stop. Plus, when we don’t get enough sleep, our metabolism slows down, and we tend to crave high-carbohydrate foods that provide a quick energy boost.”

So are we actually helping ourselves at all by sleeping less? Probably not. It lowers our waking quality of life and increases our risk for accidents, and it even makes us want to eat more. I think I need to consider a good night’s sleep a necessity rather than a luxury. You can rest easy knowing I will pay more attention to my sleep habits going forward.

Health Education

National Health Education Week

It was National Health Education Week, so we gave you helpful info and resources each day on social media so you could learn more about a variety health subjects.

Did you know Hepatitis B is the most common infectious disease in the world today? Approximately 2 billion people have it. That’s why vaccinations are so important! Learn more.

29.1 million people, 9.3% of the population, have diabetes. 8.1 million people, or 27.8 % of those who have it are undiagnosed. Learn the symptoms and get help today.

Mental illness affect 1 in 4 Americans every year. These conditions are some of the lease covered by media. You can learn more about what you or your loved ones are feeling and going through, and find or give help.

Oral and dental health problems like dry mouth, gum disease, and denture sores can become serious. Yearly dentist visits are important to preventing these. If you think you might be suffering from one of these, you can learn more.

Not getting enough sleep is related to lots of other health problems, and ¼ of Americans don’t get enough. Nearly 10% experience chronic insomnia. Learn more about some of the things that could be hurting your sleep.

187 million adults and 6.8 million children currently suffer from asthma, and people still die from it each year. Learning and being prepared is the key to maintaining your asthma. Take control with these tips from the American Lung Association.

Lung cancer is the leading cancer-killer in the U.S. While tobacco use can be a cause, those who have never used tobacco can still get it. Lung cancer also presents many emotional challenges, including blame. Learn more about the disease and helping.