Tag Archives: HIV

AIDS Awareness Month

AIDS Awareness Month

December is AIDS Awareness Month, and more than 1 million Americans are living with HIV, but 1 in 5 aren’t aware they’re infected.

Learning About AIDS

 

HIV has not disappeared since it was an epidemic. Every 9.5 minutes, someone in the U.S. is infected. It’s important to continue to raise awareness and fund education.

Continuing to Educate About AIDS

 

HIV is a virus that attacks the body’s immune system. Eventually, it can destroy enough T cells that the body can’t fight off infections or other diseases.

Attacking T-Cells

 

The worst version of an HIV infection is AIDS, and those suffering from it get severe illnesses because their immune system is so damaged.

Damaged Immune Systems

 

In the 1980s when the AIDS epidemic began, those who contracted HIV weren’t likely to live more than a few years. Now, thanks to antiretroviral therapy, their quality of life is much better.

Improving AIDS Quality of Life

 

Antiretroviral therapy helps stop HIV from multiplying. Patients’ immune cells can then live longer and reduce the risk of transmitting HIV to others.

People at high risk for contracting HIV/AIDS can take PrEP to help prevent infection.

Protect Yourself with PrEP

Understand AIDS

Understand AIDS

In honor of World AIDS day this month, we want to help raise awareness about HIV and help you understand AIDS.

HIV is an infection transmitted between people by bodily fluids like blood. People can have flu-like symptoms 2 to 4 weeks after becoming infected.

Lifecycle of HIV

 

HIV multiplies in your system, and without HIV treatment, it usually advances to AIDS in 10 years or longer, when the immune system is severely damaged.

AIDS Progression

 

Women with HIV can give it to their babies during pregnancy or childbirth, but your doctor can help you prevent this with medicine, C-sections, and formula.

Preventing Transmission to Your Baby

 

If you’re HIV positive, make sure you know how to prevent transmission to protect your loved ones and partners.

Protecting Your Loved Ones from HIV

 

Talk to your doctor, get tested regularly, and know how to prevent HIV infection and protect yourself now.

Protecting Yourself from AIDS

 

If you’ve just been diagnosed with HIV/AIDS, what can you expect? Know what tests and treatments come next.

What's Next After an HIV Diagnosis?

 

Understand how your care team, including case managers, can help you manage HIV/AIDS, and learn more about living with HIV/AIDS.

Your HIV/AIDS Care Team

World AIDS Day and Raising AIDS Awareness

AIDS Awareness

World AIDS day was December 1, so we’re helping raise HIV and AIDS awareness this week.

Make sure you understand the basic facts.

HIV 101

 

From 2005 to 2014, the annual number of new AIDS/HIV diagnoses declined by 19%.

Who's At Risk?

 

1 in 8 of those infected with HIV don’t know they’re infected. Get tested.

We're Getting Tested!

 

51% of young people living with HIV don’t know they’re infected, so getting tested is key.

We're Doing It

 

Treatment helps save lives. Work with your doctor if you’re diagnosed.

HIV Treatment Works

 

An estimated 1.2 million people in the United States are living with HIV.Let’s Stop HIV Together

 

Talking about AIDS and raising awareness can save lives.

Stop HIV One Conversation At a Time

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Remembering with Alzheimer’s

Vantage Point: Sometimes Behavior is not a Problem, it is a Message

My grandmother died of Alzheimer’s over 15 years ago. I still remember my family’s denial. We couldn’t agree on her course of care, and it cut like a knife when she no longer recognized us.

Alzheimer’s is the third-leading cause of death in Washington. Yet current resources are treating less than five percent of those suffering. Recently, I attended an excellent presentation by Bob LeRoy of the Inland Northwest Chapter of the Alzheimer’s Association. Bob provided some staggering data which showed in comparison to diseases like diabetes, cancer, and HIV, Alzheimer’s receives the least funding for research. Yet it has grown the most drastically.

Nationally, more than five million people live with Alzheimer’s. With 10,000 people turning 65 every day, that number will grow quickly. Alzheimer’s has become the most expensive disease to treat in America and yet still lacks resources for support. Most caregivers of those diagnosed are unpaid family members.

Sadly, since my grandma’s time there have not been major strides in awareness, education or advocacy. But there are those trailblazing a path of hope. The Inland Northwest Alzheimer’s Association has a vision of a world without Alzheimer’s, where through research they can provide and enhance care to support all affected and reduce the risk of dementia through promoting brain health. Current resources include:

• Online workshops – Know the Ten Warning Signs
• Alzheimer’s Navigator – Help creating custom plans
• Community Resource Finder
• ALZ Connect – Networking with others who care for people with dementia
• Care Team Calendar – For coordination of responsibilities among family and friends
• Safety Center – Information and resources for safety in and out of the home

Find these resources at ALZ.org, or you may call 800-272-3900 for a 24/7 helpline.

Want to get involved? ALZ.org can help you find information on a 2014 Walk to End Alzheimer’s event in your area. In Douglas County, it’s a good idea to register your loved one on the Vulnerable Persons Register to help emergency responders assist and better meet their special needs. Find more.

Health Alliance Medicare encourages its members to take advantage of their comprehensive wellness benefits and in doing so hopes any signs of dementia can be identified early.  Until there is a cure taking action can help ease the pain of Alzheimer’s, both those for those who cope with the disease and those who care for them.