Tag Archives: high cholesterol

Self Improvement Month

Self-Improvement Month

It’s Self-Improvement Month, and we can help you set goals and make changes to improve your health and wellness.

Your food choices are a key part of maintaining a healthy body weight, which can reduce your risk of heart disease, high blood pressure and cholesterol, and more. Get help making healthy food choices each step of the way.

Healthy Food Choices

 

Get moving to improve your health and how you feel. Studies have found that any kind of exercise, even deep cleaning your kitchen, can help.

Moving Many Ways

 

Is there something you’ve always wanted to try? Finding a hobby you love and taking on new challenges is a great way to fight stress and channel your passion.

Pick a Passion

 

Take an adventure. Traveling is one of the best ways to broaden your horizons, and even if you don’t go far, exploration will be worth the experience.

Adventure Away

 

Become a mentor. Whether it’s to a new co-worker, your nephew, or at-risk youth, mentoring can help you and someone else grow.

Become a Mentor

 

Adjust and refocus on your goals. Figure out what’s working and what isn’t, and make a system to stick with them, like a dream board, planner, or journal.

Evaluate your relationships and how you can be a better friend, spouse, or parent to those you love. Focus on small ways to make improvements for each type of relationship.

Prioritize Relationships

PCOS Awareness Month

PCOS Awareness Month

It’s Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome, or PCOS Awareness Month. PCOS is an endocrine disorder that affects 1 in 10 women, more than 7 million total.

Learning About PCOS

 

More women suffer from PCOS than the number of people diagnosed with breast cancer, rheumatoid arthritis, multiple sclerosis, and lupus combined.

Unity in the Face of PCOS

 

With PCOS, many women develop cysts because of a hormonal imbalance. Insulin may also be linked to it.

Insulin Levels

 

PCOS Symptoms can include infertility, abnormal menstrual cycles, weight gain, pain, and more.

PCOS Symptoms

 

Your doctor can perform an exam or tests to check for signs and symptoms of PCOS. Ask about them at your next well-woman visit.

You and Your Well-Woman Visit

 

If you suffer from PCOS, you’re more likely to have serious health problems like diabetes, high blood pressure, high cholesterol, and sleep apnea.

More Serious Health Risks that Go with PCOS

 

There isn’t a cure for PCOS, but your doctor can help you treat it and its symptoms. You can also donate time or money.

PCOS Treatment and Support

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National Eye Exam Month

National Eye Exam Month

August is National Eye Exam Month, and 12.2 million Americans require some sort of vision correction but don’t use any, according to the Vision Council of America.

Almost 50% of children under 12 have never seen an eye care professional. Eye exams can help you fix issues early.

Eye Exams for Kids

 

1 in 4 kids have vision problems, and it’s a common reason for them to fall behind in school. Eye exams could help stop reading problems in their tracks.

Read Better with Glasses

 

Many eye diseases have no symptoms. Eye exams can help your doctor catch serious issues early.

 

Many eye conditions can be improved if they’re caught early, especially in children. Schedule an eye exam for your kids.

Fight Eye Problems Fast

 

Eye exams can also help spot other problems, like high blood pressure, diabetes, and high cholesterol.

Window to Your Health

 

If you’re having unexplained headaches, your eye doctor might be able to help. It may be as simple as updating your prescription.

Fighting Headaches with Your Eyes

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Protect Your Health for Dairy Month

Dairy Month

June is Dairy Month. Do you know why you should be getting dairy in your diet?

Calcium in dairy helps build your bones and teeth and prevent breaks.

The Benefits of Dairy

 

Dairy is especially important for kids. It helps build bone mass while they’re young.

Dairy and Your Kids

 

A diet with dairy in it helps reduce your risk of osteoporosis later in life.

Dairy In Your Diet

 

Dairy, especially yogurt and milk, is rich in potassium, which helps with your blood pressure.

A diet with dairy in it helps reduce your risk of cardiovascular disease and high cholesterol.

Yogurt and Milk's Benefits

 

The vitamin D in dairy helps your body maintain calcium and protect your bones.

Building Stronger Bones

 

A diet with dairy in it also helps lower your risk of type 2 diabetes.

Preventing Disease with Dairy

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Blood Pressure and Cholesterol Resources

National Cholesterol Education Month

It’s National Cholesterol Education Month. Do you know what cholesterol is and what your levels mean? Learn more.

Cholesterol Defined

 

What can high cholesterol do to you? Learn more about the consequences.

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Knowing your cholesterol numbers can help protect you from heart disease and stroke. Learn more.

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High cholesterol can be different for different people. Learn about your risk.

Your Cholesterol Risk

 

Learn about the symptoms, diagnosis, and monitoring for your cholesterol and protect yourself.

Knowing Your Numbers

 

Preventing high cholesterol is important, but so is knowing about treatment. Learn about both.

Do you need tools and resources as you learn about your cholesterol? The American Heart Association can help.

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In Case of Emergency: FAST

Vantage Point: Act FAST

Due to its beauty, 4 distinct seasons, diverse recreation opportunities, and 300-plus days a year of sunshine, North Central Washington is a paradise to many. Living here helps to promote a healthy lifestyle and positive attitude.

For several years, North Central Washington has also been known for the inevitability of summer wildfires. And last year, with the towns of Carlton and Pateros burning, and this year, with the town of Wenatchee on fire, it’s put a whole new meaning on how devastating, scarring, and unpredictable wildfires can be and how important it is to act fast when one occurs. The same can be said for a stroke.

A stroke is an often unrecognized, true emergency, cutting off vital blood flow and oxygen to the brain. Strokes are the second-leading cause of death for people 60 years or older worldwide, the fifth-leading cause of death in the United States, and a leading cause of serious long-term adult disability.

Strokes can happen to anyone, at any time, regardless of race, sex, or age. Risk factors include high blood pressure, high cholesterol, atrial fibrillation, smoking, diabetes, poor circulation, inactivity, obesity, and family history. You can learn more by visiting the National Stroke Association’s Stroke Awareness website, but the best action you can take is to get regular checkups with your primary care doctor, so together you can formulate your own prevention plan.

There are two types of strokes, ischemic and hemorrhagic, and during a stroke, 2 million brain cells die every minute, increasing risk of permanent brain damage and disability. Therefore, recognizing symptoms and acting fast to get medical attention can save a life and limit disabilities. The sooner you call 911, the better chance there is of recovery. So remember, “FAST” stands for:

  • Face, look for an uneven smile.
  • Arms, check to see if one arm is weak or unable to move.
  • Speech, listen for slurred speech or inability to speak.
  • Time, call 911 at the first sign.

Like natural disasters, many times, health concerns such as strokes come with no warning or time to prepare, so it’s important to have adequate health insurance coverage. Our expert and local customer service representatives are always here to help our members understand all their health insurance benefits, especially in the case of an emergency, so they can worry less and focus on what is most important, enjoying the North Central Washington good life.

Shannon Sims is a Medicare community liaison for Health Alliance, serving Chelan, Douglas, Grant, and Okanogan counties in Washington. She has four adult sons and two grandsons. During her time off, she performs as part of a rodeo drill team on her horse, Skeeter.

Women's Health and Taking Control

National Women’s Health Week

Next week is National Women’s Health Week, so had more info on the subject each day this week.

Are you wondering what steps you should be taking for better health? It’s different for every age. Find out what you should be doing.

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Did you know your annual well-woman visit is covered by your insurance? Don’t let anything stand in the way for getting screened. Things to know about your visit:

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Get active! You can reduce your risk of many diseases by exercising for just 30 minutes a day. So skip that Friends rerun and get busy:

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Your mental health and stress can hurt your physical health, and women are more likely to have anxiety and PTSD (Post Traumatic Stress Disorder)sm. Tips to take care of your brain too:

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Risky actions are unhealthy for you, and your family. Protect them by making smart choices:

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What you put in your body matters, and you have to make those decisions 200 times a day! Make smart ones for better health:

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Take the National Women’s Health Week pledge to join women across the nation who are coming together to take a step towards better health.

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