Tag Archives: help

Honor a Veteran This Veterans Day

Covered Bridge: Honor and Comfort a Veteran

My aunt is a quilter. If you know a quilter or happen to be one yourself, you know that this is more of a way of life than a hobby.

Every important occasion in our family merits a quilt. Getting married? Quilt. Having a baby? Quilt. Everywhere you turn from in town to in the country, you see barn quilts on sheds, and those patterns inspire her.

November is an important month in our country because it’s the month we celebrate Veterans Day. How do you recognize Veterans Day? Of course my aunt would say, “I’ve got a quilt for that!”

The Quilts of Valor Foundation is an organization that seeks out veterans to honor by making and presenting them with a handmade quilt. Its motto is “Quilting to Honor and Comfort.” I like that. Here is a group of people with a passion for sewing something with their own two hands to make someone else feel better. To date, Quilts of Valor has given away more than 193,000 quilts.

Let’s go back to the question, “How do you recognize Veterans Day?” Or better yet, do you recognize a veteran?

We live in a time in our nation’s history when a veteran can look so many different ways. Our nation’s veterans are handsome 90-year-old WWII veterans, hardworking Korean War veterans, proud but quiet Vietnam veterans, or even the 25-year-old grandson or granddaughter of someone you know.

The men and women who serve our country have done so in my name, in your name. How can you recognize them today? How can you say, “I see you and understand what you mean to this country?” We can’t all make quilts. But we can buy cups of coffee. We can shake hands, or if appropriate, give a hug. We can all say thank you.

Here are some organizations that reach out to veterans. See if you can find one in your community and offer whatever special skill you have to their cause. If you bake, bake. If you woodwork, woodwork. Share yourself with a veteran so they know you care. It’s the very least any of us can do to honor and comfort the heroes around us.

Morgan Gunder is a community and broker liaison for Reid Health Alliance. Born in the South and raised in the Midwest, she is a wife and mother with a passion for traveling, learning, and technology.

National Depression Education & Awareness Month

National Depression Education & Awareness Month

It’s National Depression Education & Awareness Month, and depression affects over 19 million people in the U.S.

There are several types of depression, but the most common one is major depression. Symptoms of major depression stop you from enjoying your daily life for at least 2 weeks straight.

Major Depression

 

Postpartum depression affects mothers after giving birth and can make it difficult to bond with or even care for their new babies.

Postpartum Depression

 

Seasonal affective disorder is a common kind of depression where your mood is affected by the changes in the seasons, and the colder months of the year drain you of energy.

Fighting SAD

 

Depression can be caused by genetics, trauma, stress, brain structure, brain chemistry, substance abuse, and even other conditions like sleep issues, ADHD, and chronic pain.

Reasons for Depression

 

While symptoms can vary, adults suffering from depression usually feel overwhelmed with sadness. Children and teens are more likely to be irritable. Women also tend to note anxiety, while men report aggression.

The Differences in Depression Symptom

 

80 to 90% of those who seek depression treatment will get the help they need. Antidepressants are a powerful treatment, and there are more treatment options than ever, from therapy to meditation and yoga.

How Treatment Can Help Depression

 

Depression is tied to a higher risk of suicidal behavior. If you or someone you love is struggling with suicidal thoughts, it’s important to talk to a doctor.

If you need to talk to someone immediately, call the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 1-800-273-8255.

Getting Help for Suicidal Thoughts

Children’s Vision and Learning Month

Children’s Vision and Learning Month

It’s Children’s Vision and Learning Month, and you’d be surprised how important vision can be to learning.

1 in 10 children have a vision problem significant enough to affect their ability to learn.

Children's Vision and Learning

 

20/20 vision means you can see at a distance, but it doesn’t mean a child can focus, coordinate, and track with their eyes, which can impact their performance in school.

Vision and Focus at School

 

Children with vision problems can be misdiagnosed with ADHD because they have poor reading comprehension, skip or reread lines, take longer to do school work, or show a short attention span.

Mistaken ADHD Diagnoses Based on Vision Issues

 

Teaching your kids skills like using scissors, drawing, painting, and handwriting before school can help them establish hand-eye coordination, be ahead in school, and help you spot potential eye problems.

Teaching Hand-Eye Coordination

 

School vision screenings provide less than 4% of the eye tests needed to help kids see, and they can miss up to 75% of vision problems.

School Vision Screenings

 

61% of children who were found to have eye problems through school screenings are never taken to the doctor to get help.

Going to the Eye Doctor

 

Yearly comprehensive vision exams with an eye doctor are the best way to protect your child’s sight and make sure they’re prepared to learn at school.

PTSD Awareness Month

PTSD Awareness Month

It’s PTSD Awareness Month, and PTSD, or post-traumatic stress disorder, is an anxiety problem certain people suffer from caused by traumatic events like combat or a serious accident.

Understanding PTSD

 

Those suffering from PTSD may relive the event with overwhelming memories, flashbacks, or nightmares that disrupt their day-to-day lives.

PTSD Symptoms

 

Veterans are some of the U.S. citizens most likely to suffer from PTSD.

Veterans and PTSD

 

Homeless vets today are even more likely to be haunted by PTSD than veterans of previous eras were.

The Homeless Vets and PTSD Connection

 

Injured soldiers’ sleep issues can be key to improving their rehabilitation and issues with PTSD.

Sleep Issues and PTSD

 

Consider these issues and guidelines if you’re wondering about seeing a therapist for your PTSD.

Learn more about PTSD, its symptoms, treatment, and how to get more help.

PTSD Support and Help

Pregnancy Discomforts

Dealing with Pregnancy Discomforts

Pregnancy Discomforts

Some parts of pregnancy can be uncomfortable, and that’s normal. While you should still tell your doctor about small pregnancy discomforts, here are some tips that can help:

Nausea & Vomiting

  • Eat small meals regularly
  • Eat carbs, especially in the morning after you get up
  • Avoid greasy and spicy foods

Fatigue

  • Rest or nap when you can
  • Ask for help with tasks
  • Go to bed earlier than you would’ve before your pregnancy

Dizziness

  • Stand up slowly
  • Hold onto walls or other supporting structures for balance
  • Ask your doctor about taking a vitamin supplement

Hemorrhoids

  • Drink plenty of water and juice
  • Eat more fruit and veggies for fiber
  • Ask your doctor about medication

Swelling & Fluid Retention

  • Lay on one of your sides
  • Elevate your legs while resting
  • Wear support hose

 

Make sure you pay attention to your body and that it’s not just a discomfort though. These signs of early labor can help you know when you need to get to the doctor.

Get Organized

Covered Bridge: Getting Organized for the New Year

Every year I start out with a new goal. Of course, a healthier lifestyle is always at the top of my list, but I also always make other goals. (Maybe it’s so if I fail at my first goal, I have backups? We’ll discuss that on next year’s January e-column if I succeed!)

Some are big and some are small, but one I know consistently comes back each year is, “how do I get organized?” (I do realize that if this is a consistent goal each year, shouldn’t it be my first goal? Baby steps here…)

I notice each year when I set out to accomplish this goal, I feel the need to take this on alone, and then suddenly, I’m overwhelmed and want to quit immediately. That should be my first red flag.  

Asking for help should be the first step in this goal. Whether it’s from a spouse, children, family members, friends, or co-workers, asking for help will always make it easier to get the task done, no matter what you are trying to organize.

Don’t try to do it all at once! We get so wrapped up in trying to accomplish our new goal that we try to do too much at once, and then we fail, because it’s just too much. Start small, work in timed intervals, and most importantly, remember it doesn’t have to be done in one day.

Enjoy the process! Whether you are reminiscing over photos or paperwork or cleaning out the garage, take the time to remember the things you’re going through and share your stories with someone. You never know, someone may want the item as a keepsake to tell the story later.

At Reid Health Alliance, we hold Downsizing and Decluttering educational presentations, and if you know a group that may want some more information in the coming months, please feel free to reach out to me. Even if I never get organized this year, I can help you get organized!

Happy New Year and new goals!

Morgan Gunder is a community and broker liaison for Reid Health Alliance. Born in the South and raised in the Midwest, she is a wife and mother with a passion for traveling, learning, and technology.

Signs of Dyslexia

Dyslexia Awareness Month

October is also Dyslexia Awareness Month. Dyslexia is a neurological condition, which causes a difference in how people understand and process language.

Dyslexia Awareness Month

 

Since there’s no cure, a dyslexia diagnosis can feel overwhelming. While it makes reading more difficult, almost all people with dyslexia can learn to read.

Learning to Read

 

Dyslexia does not affect intelligence. Thomas Edison, Albert Einstein, Stephen Spielberg, and many more have excelled despite having dyslexia.

Intelligence and Dyslexia

 

Dyslexia runs in families, so if you have dyslexia, you should keep an eye out for signs of it in your children.

Dyslexia and Your Kids

 

Your child might have dyslexia if they have trouble learning their sounds or letters, or to speak, read, and write.

Getting special instruction that breaks down language structure can help your student cope with dyslexia.

Help Learning with Dyslexia

 

You have a right to get help or special considerations when taking certain tests, applying for colleges, or applying for jobs.

Your Rights with Dyslexia