Tag Archives: health

Understanding Prescription Details

Long View: Safety in the Details

Some people say I get into details too much. To some, paying attention to details is a strength. To others, it may be irritating. However, specific details make a difference, depending on the situation.

I remember an incident where a friend was going to meet me after I got off work. The friend called me to ask what time I was getting off work. I told them the time and asked them to meet me after. Well, I assumed they knew where to meet me since we had met before at the same place.

Instead, this person met me at the right time but at the wrong place. I was in front of my house. But they were in front of my workplace. The biggest issue was that at the time, I was commuting to work about 40 miles away, so I had to sit and wait until they traveled back. Time, money, and patience were wasted all due to an assumption, lack of clarification, and lack of details.

Earlier this year, I gave a presentation on health advocacy to a Parkinson’s disease support group. One of the important points was that it’s important for patients to speak up to their healthcare provider. It’s important to speak up about concerns, needs, and expectations. One of the things patients are encouraged to speak up about is their prescription medications. Some questions you should be asking your provider during an appointment included:

  1. What will the medication you’re prescribing do?
  2. How do I take it?
  3. What are the side effects?

There was a point made in the open discussion at this presentation on instructions about how often and when to take a particular prescription commonly used to treat Parkinson’s disease. An instruction on the medication label said to take it 4 times a day. Being familiar with this medication, the person knew the instructions usually said to take 4 times a day during waking hours. The person inquired about it and found that those details had been omitted by the pharmacist. But the doctor’s intent was for it to be taken during waking hours. This was an important detail for treating a Parkinson’s patient.

I’m not sure what adverse effect may have happened if the medication had not been taken during waking hours. But any risk is too much of a risk to take when it concerns taking medication and your good health. Following the directions of prescription medication labels can help you avoid the risk of having adverse reactions. It can also help you gain the full intended benefit of the drug. And it’s also important to ask clarifying, detailed questions before taking medication.

We want you to be your best and to take charge of your health. When it comes to your health and wellness, don’t be afraid to speak up and ask questions. There is safety in the details.

 

Sherry Gordon-Harris is a community liaison at Health Alliance. She is a wife and mother of 2 boys and enjoys traveling, collecting dolls, and hosting princess parties and princess pageants.

Get Ready for Kindergarten Month

Get Ready for Kindergarten Month

August is Get Ready for Kindergarten Month! The first thing to do to make sure your little one is ready to start school is to check out our Summer Health Checklist.

Summer Health Checklist

 

Double-check which shots your little one needs before they start kindergarten.

Your Children’s Preventive Care and Physicals

 

Make sure they’ve had their annual physical before they start. What happens at their next annual well-child appointment? We can help.

Well-Child Visits – Ages 5 to 10

 

Read books with your child to help them get ready for their first day of school.

Read About Kindergarten

 

Walk your child by the school, play on the playground, and if possible, give them a tour to make them feel more secure.

Tour the School

 

Plan their sleep schedule ahead of time so they’ll be adjusted to their new morning schedule for school.

Adjust Their Sleep Schedule

 

If you can, take a practice bus trip or walk through their morning trip with them so they’re ready on the first day of school to tackle getting there.

Practice the Bus Trip

Herbal/Prescription Interaction Awareness Month

Herbal/Prescription Interaction Awareness Month

July is Herbal/Prescription Interaction Awareness Month. Just because something is natural or a “supplement” doesn’t mean it’s safe, especially if you’re taking other prescription drugs.

Herbal supplements with cranberry extract as a primary ingredient can interact with blood thinning medications, so you shouldn’t take both at the same time.

Cranberry Extract Interactions

 

Ginkgo, most commonly taken to improve memory, has been shown to interact with aspirin, diuretics, anticonvulsants, antidepressants, and blood thinners.

Ginko Interactions

 

Echinacea, largely used to fight the cold and flu, can interact with some chemotherapy agents, caffeine, liver medications, and meds that decrease your immune system.

Echinacea Interactions

 

Saw palmetto, a popular active ingredient in supplements, can be dangerous during pregnancy and can  interact with birth control, hormone therapy, and medication that prevents blood clots.

Saw Palmetto Interactions

 

Fish oils, taken for heart and bone health, may interact with high blood pressure meds, birth control, and some meds that prevent blood clots.

Fish Oils Interactions

 

Keep a list of all your prescriptions and supplements and talk to your doctor about them to make sure there aren’t any interactions. You can also learn more by reading warning labels on your medications or talking to your pharmacist.

Talking About Drug Interactions

How to Stay Healthy While Traveling

5 Tips to Stay Healthy While Traveling

Traveling is amazing! What’s not to love about discovering new places, meeting new people and trying new foods? But, traveling also means that your fitness, eating, and sleep habits are disrupted, which can affect your overall health. Assist America, our travel emergency assistance partner has tips for helping you stay healthy while traveling. 

  1. Adopt a Go-To Travel Exercise Routine.

To-Go Travel Routine

If you travel regularly, create an exercise routine that can easily be adapted to your environment and that you can commit to when you’re on-the-go. Your routine should be simple and short, with exercises you can do in a hotel room, a gym, a park, or even on a beach.

If you are a runner, make sure to pack your running gear with you. Running is a great way to discover a destination from a different angle.

If working out isn’t your thing, simply set aside 10 minutes in the morning to stretch before you start your day and another 5 minutes at night to wind down. It will help you relax and energize your body. 

  1. Choose Walking Over Cabs or Public Transportation.

Choose Walking

Whenever you can, choose to walk rather than hop in a cab, bus, or subway since walking is beneficial for your health. It helps improve circulation, sleep, and breathing. It also strengthens muscles, supports your joints, and can lead to weight loss. 

  1. Hydrate, Hydrate, Hydrate!

Hydrate, Hydrate, Hydrate

Reusable water bottles are your best travel ally. Once you get through airport security check points, fill up your bottle at a nearby water fountain and make sure you keep drinking water on the plane.

Once you’ve arrived at your destination, fill up before you leave your hotel room if it’s safe to drink the tap water at your destination. If it’s not, ask the hotel for unopened water bottles or buy some at a store nearby. And don’t forget to drink plenty of water at restaurants or even hanging out by the pool.

  1. Commit to One Healthy Meal a Day

One Healthy Meal a Day

While there’s nothing wrong with trying new foods and enjoying big meals, having several rich meals per day can be hard on your body.

If you’re staying at a rental or an apartment-hotel, take advantage of the kitchen by cooking simple meals depending on your schedule. If you’re going to be eating out a lot, opt for vegetarian dishes, choose grilled options over fried, try some fresh seafood, and look at the salad menu. 

  1. Sleep! 

Get Enough Sleep While Traveling

Changing time zones, walking all day, carrying suitcases, all of these can be harsh on your body and your energy. Just being away from your own bed can make it hard to fall asleep. Make sure to rest and to get plenty of sleep by blocking out the lights, reducing the noise, and turning your phone off.

 

If you incorporate these tips into your travel routine, we guarantee you will feel refreshed and full of energy to enjoy each of your trips to their fullest!

Nationally Sexually Transmitted Diseases (STDs) Month

National Sexually Transmitted Diseases (STDs) Month

It’s National Sexually Transmitted Diseases (STDs) Month, and cases of STDs are at an all time high. Have you been tested each year or talked to your doctor about your sexual health?

Talking Sexual Health with Your Doctor

 

Next time you visit your primary or well-woman doctor, take the time to give them a sexual history, which can help them know what STD tests to give you.

Talking to Your Doctor About STDs



You should be comfortable talking to your doctor about your sexual history. Find someone who treats you with respect, listens to your concerns, takes the time to answer your questions, and sets up the right screenings and preventive care.

Worried about what your doctor might ask you before you get tested for an STD? This list can help you be ready when they ask about your sexual history.

Prepare to Talk to Your Doctor About Sexual Health

 

Most STDs are curable, and all have some form of treatment to help alleviate symptoms, so getting tested is always good for your health. It will get you closer to the right treatment faster.

STD Treatment

 

The best ways to protect yourself from long-term, irreversible damage to your health from STDs is to get tested and start treatment or to get preventive care like the HPV vaccine.

Preventing STDs

 

If you’ve been diagnosed with an STD, you might be able to get treatment for your partner too at the same time, which is called expedited partner therapy.

STD Treatment for Your Partner

National Financial Wellness Month

National Financial Wellness Month

It’s National Financial Wellness Month, and we have tips about taking care of your finances, especially as they relate to health insurance.

Using Your FSA

If your health insurance features a flexible spending account (FSA), you could save on all kinds of health services and products.

Your FSA and the New Year

 

Health savings accounts (HSAs) are becoming more common, and if your plan has one, it could help you with your medical expenses and offset high deductibles. 

Saving with an HSA

 

You might not realize how much money you’re losing going to the emergency room when you should be going to urgent care. Know where to go and save.

Skipping the ER

 

You know you pay a premium for your health insurance, but do you understand all of your out-of-pocket costs, like deductibles, copays, and coinsurance? Make sense of what you pay.

Paying Out-of-Pocket Costs

 

Do you know what happens after you get care? Make sense of the claims process, how your doctor gets paid, and what you’ll owe.

Paying Healthcare Costs

 

Making financial plans for your future can help you be ready for retirement, Medicare, and medical emergencies. Be prepared.

Making Financial Plans

 

Financial wellness can impact other parts of your health too. These tips can help you track your spending, set goals, and more.

Recognizing Early Labor

Recognizing Early Labor

Early labor begins before you’ve finished 37 weeks of pregnancy, and babies born this early can have lifelong or life-threatening health problems.

What Happens

If you go into early labor, you will likely be given meds to delay or stop it. In some cases, it can be delayed long enough to transport you to a hospital that has a . You may also be given medications that can improve the baby’s health if they come early.

Warning Signs

  • Contractions – Your abdomen will tighten like a fist every 10 minutes or more.
  • Change in Vaginal Discharge – You might leak fluid or bleed from your vagina.
  • Pelvic Pressure – This might feel like your baby is pushing down.
  • Cramps – These might feel like your period or like abdominal cramps with or without diarrhea.
  • Backache – You might feel a low, full backache.

What to Do

Call your doctor or go to the hospital right away if you’re going into labor or have any of the warning signs. They may tell you to:

  • Come into the office or go to the hospital for a checkup
  • Stop what you’re doing and rest on your side for an hour
  • Drink 2 to 3 glasses of water or juice

If your symptoms get worse or do not go away after an hour, call your doctor back or go to the hospital. If the symptoms improve, relax for the rest of the day.