Tag Archives: green

Air Quality Index

Keeping Track of Air Quality

Just like a stoplight tells you when to go, the Air Quality Index (AQI) tells you when it’s safe to go outside and how clean the air is to breathe.

Across America, the AQI tracks smog, pollution from cars, soil dust, pollen, and ash. Every day, the Environment Protection Agency (EPA) gives the air quality a color.

Green is the best, and as it goes from green to yellow to orange, the air gets less clean.

Poor air quality is a threat to everyone’s health, but children, the elderly, and those with breathing problems need to be even more careful. The worse the air, the more likely it will trigger an asthma flare-up.

Green is when it’s perfect to play outside, but as it changes colors, slow down or maybe even stay in.

AQI Color

AQI Status

Advice

Green

Good

Enjoy the outdoors.

Yellow

Moderate

Enjoy the outdoors, but maybe limit how long you’re outside.

Orange

Unhealthy for elderly, kids, and those with breathing problems

Take it easy, and if you’re at risk, think about staying inside.

Red

Unhealthy

Stay inside.

Purple

Very unhealthy

Stay inside.

Maroon

Hazardous

Definitely stay inside.

 

Before you head out, you can check the day’s color at AirNow, and protect yourself from the start.

Safe and Green While Cleaning

Green While Cleaning Your Home

Magazines, newspapers, TV, and the internet all remind you to go green whenever possible, at the office, while driving, even at the grocery store.  But what about at home? Do you go green while cleaning?

Even better, do you go green at home and save money while doing so?

Try a non-toxic approach to cleaning your house. Ammonia, bleach, and other toxins can be harmful to you, your children, and your pets. When there are affordable ways to clean all naturally, why not go green in your home?

Green While Cleaning Swaps

Swap these natural cleaning solutions for harsh store-bought chemicals.

To clean countertops and cutting boards

Take hot tap water and mix with vinegar. Dip a nylon scrub pad into the water and scour your countertops and cutting boards. “That’s all you need to remove the bacterial film that even strong disinfectants have trouble penetrating,” says Allen Rathey, president of the Healthy House Institute.

To clean toilets and bathtubs

To combat stains, sprinkle a generous amount of baking soda on the surface and scrub with a brush. To kill germs or mold, spray the surface with a 10% vinegar, 90% water solution, and let sit for 30 minutes. Rinse with water when finished.

To clean stains, mildew, or grease on tile

Spray or douse the area with lemon juice or vinegar. Let sit a few minutes, then scrub with a stiff brush.

To clean mirrors and glass

In a spray bottle, mix a solution of 10% vinegar and 90% water. Spray the dirty glass and wipe down with a microfiber cloth. If you don’t like the smell of vinegar, you can substitute undiluted lemon juice or club soda.

To clean wood furniture

Barely dampen a microfiber cloth and wipe off dust. If you prefer a shine on your wood furniture, follow dust removal with a soft cloth dabbed with olive or lemon oil.

To remove carpet stains and spills

Lift off any solids, then pour on club soda. Blot with a rag. The soda’s carbonation has the power to bring the spill to the surface, and the salts in the soda prevent and stop staining. For bigger spills, dump cornmeal on the mess, wait 5 to 15 minutes, and vacuum up the gunk.