Tag Archives: grandchildren

What Grandparents Should Know About Vaccines

Covered Bridge: 3 Things Grandparents Should Know About Vaccines

There are few things more exciting in this world than the arrival of a grandchild. The anticipation of seeing if the baby has your child’s eyes, the enjoyment of picking out all of those adorable baby clothes, and those precious weekends at grandma’s!

While flu season is slowly falling behind us, new grandparents should also remember the importance of protecting their grandchild from preventable illnesses by understanding all vaccines. Vaccines are not just important for the newborn, but also for you.

  1. Vaccines Are Safe and Effective

    The medical community is in agreement that vaccines are safe and effective and that they do not cause serious harm to children. Vaccines are the single most important method to prevent diseases like polio, whooping cough, and the measles. Vaccines go through rigorous testing, and children are far more likely to be harmed by the illnesses than by the vaccines themselves. The World Health Organization has a useful website debunking myths about vaccines.

  2. Whooping Cough

    Do you think whooping cough is an extinct illness from your childhood? Sadly, because people haven’t been vaccinating their kids, illnesses that were once very rare thanks to high vaccination rates are now reappearing.

    Whooping cough (also called pertussis) is one illness that is especially dangerous to newborns. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) says that in 2017, there were 17,972 reported cases of whooping cough. While that number is down from 2014, it certainly shows there is still an issue.

  3. Time for a Booster?

    You may be thinking, “Wait! I was already vaccinated against whooping cough when I was a child.” But the CDC recommends you get a Tdap shot, the vaccine that protects against whooping cough, every 10 years or if you’re 65 or older and in close contact with infants. Don’t forget about your annual flu shot either.

Take steps to protect the health of you and your grandbaby. Making precious memories with your new grandchild will be more enjoyable with that peace of mind.

 

Morgan Gunder is a community and broker liaison for Reid Health Alliance. Born in the South and raised in the Midwest, she is a wife and mother with a passion for traveling, learning, and technology.

Happy Birthday Dr. Seuss

Vantage Point: Happy Birthday, Dr. Seuss

We always hear how we need to spend more time with our loved ones. But it’s hard to find common ground with others. We might not like the same music or have the same hobbies and interests.

In March, many schools celebrate Dr. Seuss’ birthday (March 2, 1904). This is a great opportunity for kids to learn the legend of these children’s books. It’s always nice to hear kids get back home and tell us how they now know about “Green Eggs and Ham.” We have all grown up hearing these stories and catchy rhymes. Now we don’t have to worry about what we are going to talk about with our children or grandchildren.

Dr. Seuss has been such an icon for so many years. His books bring together so many families and generations. When we were children, we loved the funny characters in these stories and how much fun they had in their adventures. Dr. Seuss taught us that there is so much more to do on a rainy day than just looking out the window. That silly cat had so many tricks up his sleeve (or should I say his hat?).

These stories help with more than just letting your imagination loose. They teach us valuable lessons. “How the Grinch Stole Christmas!” really shows us that this holiday is not about material possessions but about being surrounded by the people you love the most.

“The Lorax” has a character that only thinks about himself and his success but doesn’t think about how his actions could affect the environment. This teaches us to think of the long-term effects of our actions.

Now when we spend time with our children or grandchildren, we can read them a Dr. Seuss book. Enjoy watching them take in all of the colors, characters, and rhymes. We can teach them the meaning of each story and share the stories we grew up with. We don’t have to struggle to find something we both like. Instead, we can really enjoy our time together. And why not get a couple of laughs in as well?   

 

Jessica Arroyo, born and raised in the Wenatchee Valley, is a Medicare community liaison for Health Alliance Northwest, serving Chelan, Douglas, Grant, and Okanogan counties in Washington. During her time off, she enjoys spending time with her husband and son.