Tag Archives: first aid

National Youth Sports Safety Month

National Youth Sports Safety Month

It’s National Youth Sports Safety Month, and it’s the perfect time to make sure you’re ready to enroll your little ones in summer sports.

Before your kids play organized sports, make sure they have a physical exam with their doctor that clears them to play sports safely.

Get Ready for Summer Sports

 

Your children should always have a water bottle at practice and games, especially during the summer heat. Help them stay hydrated before, during, and after play.

Kids and Hydration During Sports

 

Stretching before exercise and sports can help release muscle tension and prevent injuries like sprains and muscle tears. Make sure your athlete gets to warm up before playing.

Kids and Stretching Before Exercise

 

Rest is important on your growing kids’ bodies. It’s recommended that kids take at least 1 day a week off from a particular sport. 

A coach on the team should be certified in first aid and CPR, understand concussions, and help players avoid overuse injuries. Kids should also feel safe with their coaches, not just motivated.

Coaches Keeping Your Kids Safe

 

If you’re a parent, consider hosting an event that spotlights safety by inviting a trainer, physical therapist or other health professional to speak with players, parents, and coaches about safety.

Host a Health Sporting Event

 

You can always look to your sport’s governing body or even local sporting goods stores for health and safety guidelines and resources. If you hold gear swaps, make sure you know which equipment is safe to reuse.

League Health and Safety Guidelines
National Epilepsy Month

National Epilepsy Month

November was also National Epilepsy Month.

Epilepsy is a chronic disorder where you have regular seizures, sometimes more than one kind. While seizures may affect the whole body, the electrical events that cause them start in the brain. Where it starts, how it spreads, and how much of the brain is affected can all have long term effects.

Sometimes, people with epilepsy have similar EEG tests, clinical history, and family history, and their conditions are usually a specific epilepsy syndrome. Besides the physical effects on your body and brain, epilepsy can also affect your physical safety, your ability to drive and work, and even your relationships.

Seizures are more common than you might realize.

Did You Know: 

1 in 26 Americans will develop epilepsy in their lifetime
4th most common neurological disorder
1 in 10 people will have a seizure during their lifetime
65 million

 

Connect with people who have epilepsy and great resources on Living Well with Epilepsy.

Do you know what to do if someone is having a seizure? Learn more.

Seizure First Aid

Stay with the person
Time the seizure
Protect rom injury
Loosen anything tight around the neck
Do not restrain the person
Do not put anything in the mouth
Roll the person on their side as the seizure subsides
After the seizure talk to the person reassuringly
Preventing Drowning

Water Safety

Summer’s in full swing, and it’s important to remember some water safety tips before you hit the pool.

Never leave kids unsupervised around water! Make sure you or a trained lifeguard are watching them at all times.

Supervision in the Pool

 

Knowing CPR could help you save a life! Carle has free CPR and first aid classes.

Protecting Your Family in the Water

 

Many people, especially kids, can be allergic to the chemicals in pools, so always wash off your skin after!

Kids and Pool Chemicals

 

Interested in becoming a lifeguard and helping others with water safety? Check with the YMCA or American Red Cross for classes.

Learning to Lifeguard

 

Invest in flotation vests and devices, which are a great way to protect your kids, but are also great for adults when boating or doing water sports.

Adults and Water Safety

 

Check with local pools, the YMCA, or the American Red Cross for swim classes to teach your kids water safety.

Swimming Safety

 

The good news is that technology is hard at work to prevent children from drowning. Learn more about what’s being done.