Tag Archives: family

Honoring a Veteran

Vantage Point: Serving Those Who Served Us

“Let every nation know, whether it wishes us well or ill, that we shall pay any price, bear any burden, meet any hardship, support any friend, oppose any foe to assure the survival and the success of liberty.  – John F. Kennedy

I have three sons who served in the armed services, one who is still an active-duty Marine. Every word of that quote means a tremendous amount to my family. We understand how the rigors, values and experiences of serving in the military shape a life. What I did not realize—until talking with Patti Strawn, RN, CHPN, of Central Washington Home Health and Hospice—was how that service influences how a veteran faces serious illness and the end of life.

There are currently 22 million U.S. veterans, and 1 of every 4 people who dies is a veteran. 20% of Confluence Health hospice patients are veterans, and understanding how to care for them seems the least we can do to repay them for their service.

A friend is a Vietnam vet, and even when going out for dinner he always chooses a seat facing the room and an exit. Many veterans cannot stand the thought of laying flat, and for some it takes a long time just to get into bed because of feelings of being trapped or confined.

Imagine that person in a nursing home, hospital, or hospice situation.

Each veteran’s needs are unique and can be influenced by a number of factors, like which war they fought in, rank, branch, enlisted or drafted, prisoner of war and Post Traumatic Stress Disorder. For some veterans, the pride of serving their country is a source of comfort at the end of life. For others, hard memories may bring up pain, emotional issues, and the need for forgiveness. The military culture of stoicism, “big boys don’t cry” and guilt for making it back when others did not can also present hurdles—especially when the inability to express those long-hidden feelings prevents a peaceful passing.

It is never too late to welcome a hero home. In celebration of Memorial Day, Health Alliance Medicare encourages you to honor veterans still with us by acknowledging their brave and selfless service, and by encouraging them to register with their local Veterans Affairs (VA) office. The VA works to make sure every single veteran has compassionate end-of-life care.

Visit WeHonorVeterans.org for additional information or resources.

Affordable Care

Crunching Numbers for You

The Affordable Care Act is here to make health care affordable! Let’s run through some facts about the kinds of help you can get paying for your Health Alliance individual insurance plan, called premium tax credits and cost-sharing subsidies.

What’s a premium tax credit?

A premium is what you pay monthly to have insurance. A premium tax credit lowers your cost to make a plan affordable for you.

What is a cost-sharing subsidy?

A cost-sharing subsidy makes other health insurance costs affordable, like your deductible, coinsurance, and out-of-pocket max.

Who qualifies for help?

There’s a little math involved here. First, you need to know your individual or family income. If your income falls between 100% and 400% of the federal poverty level, you can get help from the government.

You can get government help if you’re…
An individual with a gross income* of $12,000-$46,000 a year
A family of four with a gross income of $24,000-$94,000 a year

*Gross income is everything you make in a year, before any taxes or deductions.

What’s the federal poverty level?

The federal poverty level depends on your family’s size. In 2013, it was $11,490 for a single adult and $23,550 for a family of four. You can make up to 4 times that amount and still get help!

How much help will I get?

Again, there’s a little math involved. A few tools online will do the math for you, or a Health Alliance rep can help find your subsidy amount. Call or stop by our Champaign location at 206 W. Anthony Drive, near Alexander’s Steakhouse—we’ll crunch the numbers for you.

How do I apply this help to my bill?

The only thing you have to do is pick a plan from the Public Marketplace. Any public plan will let you apply for government help. The government deals directly with us after you enroll to apply its help to your bill.

What can I do if I don’t qualify for help, but I still don’t have a lot of money? 

  1. Think about your individual risk. Your individual risk is the plan’s medical deductible added to the out-of-pocket max. This is the most you’ll have to pay (besides the monthly premium,) before a plan will cover 100% of your costs. What are you OK with paying if the worst were to happen?
  2. Pay attention to a plan’s deductible and out-of-pocket max. The higher your deductible and out-of-pocket max, the lower your monthly premium. Keep in mind that if you get sick or hurt, you will have to pay for all your medical costs until you meet your plan’s deductible.
  3. Call or stop by. It’s not a sign of weakness. It’s smart. When you need medical advice, you call the doctor. When you need health insurance insight, you talk to our helpful reps.
Young Invincibles Growing Up

Young Invincibles Feel the Love for Health Insurance

Young Invincibles

Young invincibles are young, healthy, independent, and don’t have a lot of cash to throw around, but, like everyone else, they need help when it comes to:

  • Understanding their options under the new health care law
  • Choosing the plan that’s best for them
  • Listening to their mother

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Conventional Wisdom

All kidding aside, the conventional wisdom surrounding young invincibles in need of insurance isn’t so conventional, after all. Sure, they aren’t flocking to the exchanges in droves, but they aren’t avoiding them, either.

In fact, according to this article by Aaron Smith, co-founder and executive director of Young Invincibles, as well as this press release from his organization’s website, it seems these youngsters are signing up in numbers proportional to the overall population, and possibly even at a higher rate than their older and wiser counterparts.

So good job, Mom—it turns out you raised them right!

What’s the Deal?

This may be their first time around the health insurance block, but the appeal to reason, and their very limited budgets, is bringing youthful buyers to the table. One small car or bike accident, sports injury, or even a bad case of mono could add up to HUGE medical bills that a struggling student or first-rung employee could never afford.

While many feared the typical response to the pay premiums vs. pay a tax penalty debate would be to just pay the penalty, stats show many young invincibles can do the math:

Paying a penalty and all of their potential medical costs for a year is not a good deal.

Not so Invincible, After All

It’s important to note that young invincible isn’t a title these people gave themselves. Obviously, they’re well aware it’s a big, dangerous world out there, and the smart play is getting yourself covered.

In fact, not only are your super-smart kids signing up to protect their wallets, they’re actually signing up to protect their (gasp!) health. They’re taking advantage of subsidies to buy up from the high-deductible catastrophic plans many assumed they would purchase, and investing in more benefit-rich Silver, and even Gold and Platinum, plans.

And why wouldn’t they? With many plan premiums starting under $100 a month, it’s a small price to pay for peace of mind and financial security.

Take Good Care of My Baby

So Mom, while we know you always want to take care of your kids, maybe it’s OK to let them leave the nest. And here’s something else that might ease your mind:

We’re here to help.

Keeping your family healthy and safe is a priority for us, too. Maybe you already have our group or individual plans, or know someone else who does. After all, we’ve been helping people find plans that meet their needs and situations for over 30 years, since before most of the young invincibles were even a gleam in anyone’s eye!

We have great plans, a great network of doctors and hospitals, and great people ready to explain the options, answer questions, and find the right match for your babies, as if they were our own.

Get signed up. To learn more or shop for plans, call 1-888-382-9771, visit us online at HealthAlliance.org, or stop by our Anthony Drive location in Champaign today!

Save

Helping Heart Disease

Vantage Point: Walk to Mend Hearts

As a child, I folded and cut red, heart-shaped Valentine’s Day cards. As a teenager, I experienced my first broken heart. And as adults, we learn the importance of taking care of our hearts by eating right, exercising, and avoiding damaging habits, like smoking, to avoid heart disease.

Heart disease, a disorder of the heart and blood vessels, affects people of all ages and is the number one killer of women. You should also know about atrial fibrillation (AFib) and stroke. AFib is where upper chambers of the heart beat irregularly, causing dizziness, fainting and a racing, pounding sensation. Stroke is a brain attack that occurs when blood clots block an artery or blood vessel, interrupting blood flow to the brain. People with AFib are five times more likely to have a stroke.

People diagnosed with heart problems may feel overwhelmed, anxious, and afraid, opening the door for depression. That’s where Greater Wenatchee Mended Hearts, a volunteer peer-to-peer support organization, comes in to inspire hope through people who are heart patients themselves. I recently had the privilege to attend one of Mended Hearts’ monthly meetings. The room was buzzing with encouragement. Mended Hearts also hosts educational speakers and sends monthly newsletters full of valuable information about heart disease.

One of the most valuable aspects of Mended Hearts is its Heart Patient Visiting Room program that lets heart patients meet other people who have gone through or are going through the same thing. Natalie Noyd, director of the cardiovascular service line at Confluence Health, says peer support coming from someone who has walked the walk helps heart disease patients feel they can get through the experience and aids the overall recovery process. Confluence Health and Mended Hearts work together, mutually spreading heart disease awareness and education, and helping patients, throughout North Central Washington.

Health Alliance provides therapy to help reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease and also offers rehab and testing. Sometimes heart disease runs in the family, so creating habits to help prevent the disease becomes extra important for people with a family history of heart problems. Health Alliance encourages you to learn more by joining the Go Red for Women Heart & Sole Walk on February 6 in various locations throughout Wenatchee.

Walks will also take place at Confluence Health Clinics in Omak and Moses Lake. To learn more about Mended Hearts, call Ann at 509-679-8181 or email mendedhearts91@frontier.com.

Remembering with Alzheimer’s

Vantage Point: Sometimes Behavior is not a Problem, it is a Message

My grandmother died of Alzheimer’s over 15 years ago. I still remember my family’s denial. We couldn’t agree on her course of care, and it cut like a knife when she no longer recognized us.

Alzheimer’s is the third-leading cause of death in Washington. Yet current resources are treating less than five percent of those suffering. Recently, I attended an excellent presentation by Bob LeRoy of the Inland Northwest Chapter of the Alzheimer’s Association. Bob provided some staggering data which showed in comparison to diseases like diabetes, cancer, and HIV, Alzheimer’s receives the least funding for research. Yet it has grown the most drastically.

Nationally, more than five million people live with Alzheimer’s. With 10,000 people turning 65 every day, that number will grow quickly. Alzheimer’s has become the most expensive disease to treat in America and yet still lacks resources for support. Most caregivers of those diagnosed are unpaid family members.

Sadly, since my grandma’s time there have not been major strides in awareness, education or advocacy. But there are those trailblazing a path of hope. The Inland Northwest Alzheimer’s Association has a vision of a world without Alzheimer’s, where through research they can provide and enhance care to support all affected and reduce the risk of dementia through promoting brain health. Current resources include:

• Online workshops – Know the Ten Warning Signs
• Alzheimer’s Navigator – Help creating custom plans
• Community Resource Finder
• ALZ Connect – Networking with others who care for people with dementia
• Care Team Calendar – For coordination of responsibilities among family and friends
• Safety Center – Information and resources for safety in and out of the home

Find these resources at ALZ.org, or you may call 800-272-3900 for a 24/7 helpline.

Want to get involved? ALZ.org can help you find information on a 2014 Walk to End Alzheimer’s event in your area. In Douglas County, it’s a good idea to register your loved one on the Vulnerable Persons Register to help emergency responders assist and better meet their special needs. Find more.

Health Alliance Medicare encourages its members to take advantage of their comprehensive wellness benefits and in doing so hopes any signs of dementia can be identified early.  Until there is a cure taking action can help ease the pain of Alzheimer’s, both those for those who cope with the disease and those who care for them.

Getting a Great Deal

Getting the Best Deal

“I’m always looking at ads to see who’s got the best deal,” Melissa Whitman says.

Who doesn’t love saving money? But how are great deals and health insurance connected? They may be more similar than you think, at least when you see doctors in the Health Alliance network.

“Many of our members are surprised how much they save by staying in-network,” says Melissa, a Health Alliance claims manager. “Going out-of-network can cost members twice as much, and the even more unfortunate part is they often don’t realize that until after their visit or procedure.”

With thousands of doctors and hospitals in-network (and the list growing daily), you don’t need an eye for a good deal. We have people like Melissa for that. Melissa can help with just about anything related to getting your covered care paid for.

Stepping into her cubical proves instantly there’s a lot more to Melissa than claims processing. Her family. Pictures of smiling faces decorate every open space.

“We’re always together. Cooking out,” she said. “In the summer they’re at my pool, and we just got done mushroom hunting.”

Melissa has quite the eye for those hard-to-find morels. For as long as she can remember, mushroom hunting has been an annual adventure.

“The whole family goes. Even my 89-year-old grandma gets her mushroom stick and gets in the woods,” says Melissa with a laugh.

She sums herself up simply. “I’m a city girl. I love my work, my family, and a taste of the country,” she says.

Learn About Tobacco and High Blood Pressure

Tobacco and Your Heart

Tobacco and High Blood Pressure

When you think about the damage tobacco does, you worry about your lungs and mouth. But when you combine tobacco and high blood pressure, it can be hurting you in more ways than you know.

There’s a common belief that chewing tobacco isn’t as bad for you as smoking is, but it can also cause serious health problems. Smokeless tobacco increases your heart rate and blood pressure. Some evidence suggests these products may put you at an increased risk of heart attack or stroke.

Chewing tobacco will still get you hooked on nicotine, the same way cigarettes do. Once you’re addicted, it becomes difficult to stop. Just like with smoking, withdrawals cause intense cravings, make you hungrier, and make you more irritable and depressed.

But the stimulants in all forms of tobacco can have this effect on your blood pressure. The best thing you can do for your heart is quit tobacco completely.

Help Quitting

The first step to quitting is really wanting to quit. These tips can help you get started:

  • Make a list of your reasons for quitting.
  • Set a quit date.
  • List what might stop you from staying tobacco-free. Do you smoke when you’re stressed, hungry, or when you go out with friends?
  • Plan ways to fight it in those moments.
  • Ask family, friends, and your doctor for help.

Our members can also use our Quit For Life program for help . This program helps you break tobacco’s mental and physical hold. You’ll get:

  • One-on-one coaching from a quit coach
  • A quit plan made just for you
  • Helpful tools, like Text2Quit
  • Web Coach®, an online learning and support community

It’s never too late to quit. For more information, visit QuitNow.net or call 1-866-QUIT-4-LIFE (1-866-784-8454).