Tag Archives: Emergency Room

Pain Awareness Month

Pain Awareness Month

It’s Pain Awareness Month. Many kinds of health conditions can cause chronic pain, and these resources can help you start managing that pain.

Resources for Your Pain

 

Almost all sufferers of chronic pain end up in the ER at some point. How can you be prepared and what can you expect?

E.R. Visits for Pain

 

Pain management programs and your pain management team are key to getting your pain under control.

Managing Your Pain with Your Team

 

If your pain limits your ability to perform these simple tasks, it’s time to talk to your doctor.

Pain Limiting Your Day

 

One of the most common types of chronic pain is back pain. This tool can help you describe your back pain in better detail and track your pain over time.

Migraines are a common cause of chronic pain. This guide can help you talk about your migraine pain with your doctor at your next visit.

Ongoing Headache Pain

 

Be ready to talk to your doctor at your next appointment about what’s happened with your last visit by filling out this summary.

Talking About Pain with Your Doctor

Essential Summer Safety Tips

Essential Summer Safety Tips

The summer season is finally here! But as we start to enjoy the outdoors and more adventurous activities, hospitals and urgent care facilities are bracing themselves for “trauma season” as they call it in the healthcare industry. 

Emergency rooms usually see injuries and traumas double in the summer compared to the winter months. The most common causes of injuries during the summer include car accidents, severe sunburns, water-sports injuries, dehydration, heat exhaustion, and falls.

But many of these can easily be avoided by following these essential summer safety tips that will keep you and your family safe and healthy during the summer months.

WaterTo avoid dehydration, drink plenty of water or beverages high in electrolytes. Avoid drinking too much alcohol or caffeine, both of which actually make your system lose water. Eat fruits and vegetables which contain a lot of water like grapefruits, peaches, eggplants, and spinach.

Sun ProtectionTo avoid sunburns, apply sunscreen with an at least SPF 30 and make sure you’re using a waterproof formula if you’re swimming. Stay in the shade from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m., cover your skin, and wear a hat if you’re exposed. Keep children in the shade as much as possible.

Heat ProtectionTo avoid heat exhaustion and heatstroke, don’t engage in physical activities during the hottest hours of the day. Get acclimated to the hot weather by slowly increasing the amount of time you spend outside.

Water SafetyTo avoid water-related injuries, always bring a buddy along while participating in water sports and follow the lifeguards’ instructions. Take time to get used to the difference in temperature between in and out of the water. Don’t drink alcohol before water activities.

Car SafetyTo reduce the risk of car accidents, make sure all your car maintenance is done before you leave on a trip. Allow plenty of time to arrive and try to drive during off-peak hours. Stop and take breaks every 100 miles or 2 hours, and if possible, take turns with a passenger.

 

Sometimes accidents, illnesses, and injuries cannot be avoided, even for the most careful traveler. If you find yourself injured or sick, remember that our travel emergency partner, Assist America is here to help. 

You can download the free Assist America Mobile App to access your membership details, membership ID card, list of services, or to call the 24/7 Operations Center with the tap of a button.

App Store Google Play

 

 

 

App Store is a service mark of Apple Inc., registered in the U.S. and other countries. Google Play and the Google Play logo are trademarks of Google LLC.

National Financial Wellness Month

National Financial Wellness Month

It’s National Financial Wellness Month, and we have tips about taking care of your finances, especially as they relate to health insurance.

Using Your FSA

If your health insurance features a flexible spending account (FSA), you could save on all kinds of health services and products.

Your FSA and the New Year

 

Health savings accounts (HSAs) are becoming more common, and if your plan has one, it could help you with your medical expenses and offset high deductibles. 

Saving with an HSA

 

You might not realize how much money you’re losing going to the emergency room when you should be going to urgent care. Know where to go and save.

Skipping the ER

 

You know you pay a premium for your health insurance, but do you understand all of your out-of-pocket costs, like deductibles, copays, and coinsurance? Make sense of what you pay.

Paying Out-of-Pocket Costs

 

Do you know what happens after you get care? Make sense of the claims process, how your doctor gets paid, and what you’ll owe.

Paying Healthcare Costs

 

Making financial plans for your future can help you be ready for retirement, Medicare, and medical emergencies. Be prepared.

Making Financial Plans

 

Financial wellness can impact other parts of your health too. These tips can help you track your spending, set goals, and more.

In Case of Medical Emergency

Long View: What Is a Medical Emergency?

According to Medicare.gov, a medical emergency is a situation where “[Y]ou believe you have an injury or illness that requires immediate medical attention to prevent a disability or death.”

It seems pretty straightforward, so why are there so many questions around the decision to get treatment at your local emergency room?

An emergency room (ER) provides some of the most sophisticated diagnostic options in a hospital and the most immediate care to patients in crisis.

The list of possible emergencies is endless, so it’s important for you to recognize how serious your injury or illness is and to know the best way to get treatment for it.

Many of us have heard about folks with medical emergencies driving themselves to get treatment or catching a ride with a family member. Please don’t. Driving yourself puts you and others in jeopardy and delays the start of your treatment. Dialing 911 brings you the treatment quickly and gets you to an emergency room faster than a white-knuckle trip across town, dodging traffic lights.

Dr. Frank Friedman, one of our medical directors who specializes in emergency care, said, “A true emergency is one that can’t wait. It is something causing such severe pain or such a risk to life or limb, for oneself or a loved one, that it can’t wait hours, or a day or two, to be seen by one’s own doctor or healthcare provider.”

If it’s not an emergency but you need medical care to keep an illness or injury from getting worse, call your doctor. If your doctor can’t see you right away or the office is closed, urgent care (or convenient care) can help you get treatment quickly.

Over the years, I have heard some interesting and alarming questions from our members. This FAQ can help answer those questions.

Q. I just got one of your policies, and I’m having severe chest pain. Will you cover me for an ER visit?

A. This is one of the most unsettling questions we receive. If you’re experiencing severe chest pain, don’t call your plan, call 911. It’s as simple as that.

Q. Do I have to pay a copay when I get there?

A. No, they should be able to bill you, so there’s no reason to wave your credit card around as they wheel you through the front door. In fact, under federal law, an ER has to evaluate and stabilize you in an emergency medical situation, without regard for your ability to pay.

Q. What if I have special conditions they need to know about?

A. Keep a list of your medications with you. MedicAlert’s medical IDs or the Yellow Dot program can also help you share this information. And many smart phones have features that let you add emergency contacts and medical information. Plan ahead.

Q. What are some examples of when I should go to the ER and when I should go to my doctor or urgent care?

A. Visit the ER for emergencies like chest pain, broken bones, poisoning, shortness of breath, fainting, and seizures. For things like a constant fever, strep throat, sprains, the cold or flu, earaches, or minor infections like pink eye, call your doctor or visit urgent care.

Will you recognize a medical emergency? Probably yes, so trust your judgment, act quickly, and please be careful out there.

Patrick Harness is a community liaison with a long history of experience in health insurance. If you ask him to pick a color, he always chooses orange, and he is known for his inability to parallel park.

Asthma and Allergy Awareness Month

Asthma and Allergy Awareness Month

It’s Asthma and Allergy Awareness Month. Do know the facts of asthma?

Ashtma Roundup

Ashtma and Children

Asthma in America

Asthma and Gender

Asthma and Your Age

Lack of Asthma Cure

The Cost of Untreated Asthma

Save

Preventing Group B Strep

Group B Strep Awareness Month

July is Group B Strep (GBS) Awareness Month, so we’re helping you learn more about it each day.

GBS is a type of bacteria that’s in the digestive track of up to 1 in 4 pregnant women, and can cause babies to be miscarried, stillborn, premature, handicapped, or very sick. Learn more.

1

 

GBS Disease has 3 types, prenatal (during pregnancy), early-onset which happens within your baby’s first week, and late-onset, anytime after 1 week. Learn more.

Cropped shot of a father holding his infant child in the air

 

GBS does have noticeable symptoms! If you’re pregnant, call your doctor if you have less or no fetal movement after your 20th week, or if you have an unexplained fever.

3

 

Once your baby’s born, call you doctor or take them to the ER if they have refuse to eat, sleep too much, have a high or low temp, red skin, or blue or pale skin from not enough oxygen. See the full list of symptoms.

4

 

Babies can be infected with GBS from in the womb until several months old. Women usually don’t have symptoms, but should get infections during pregnancy treated right away.

I could lay here forever

 

You can check for GBS with a urine test during pregnancy if you’re worried you might have it.

6

 

The hospital can also test your baby to see if they have GBS after they’re born, so talk to your doctor about any symptoms you see.

7

Save

In Case of Emergency

ER Care vs. Urgent Care

Your 2-year-old has an earache. You slip and sprain your ankle. You’re feeling chest pain. Do you know where you should be getting care in each of these cases?

It can be hard to know, but it’s important because if you go to the emergency room when it’s not actually an emergency, your insurance may not pay for your care.

A trip to the ER is usually the most expensive kind of care. The average ER visit costs more than the average American’s monthly rent.

If you don’t need help right away, you can save time and money by setting up a same-day appointment with your doctor or going to an urgent care or convenient care clinic. These usually have extended hours, you don’t need an appointment, and many clinics have them.

But when something happens and you need care right away, you should know which things you should go to an urgent care location for, and when you should go to the ER.

Emergency Room or Convenient Care?

Earache

Visit convenient care. This needs care to keep it from getting worse, but it won’t pose a serious health risk if not treated immediately.

Sprained Ankle

Visit convenient care. This injury isn’t life threatening, but you may need medical attention to treat it.

Chest Pain

Go to the ER. This could because of a serious problem and is normally considered a medical emergency.

A trip to the ER is usually the most expensive kind of care. If you don’t need help right away, you can save time and money by setting up a same-day appointment with your doctor or going to an urgent care or convenient care clinic. These usually have extended hours, you don’t need an appointment, and many clinics have them. Carle, for example, has a few convenient care options.

Let these examples be your guide to where you should go:

Emergencies

Urgent Care Situations

  • Shortness of breath
  • Chest pain
  • Poisoning
  • Broken bones
  • Fainting, seizures, or unconsciousness
  • Sharp wounds
  • Serious bleeding
  • Constant high or rising fever
  • Migraine headaches that don’t improve
  • Uncontrolled vomiting or diarrhea
  • Bronchitis
  • Severe allergic reactions
  • Cuts, even minor ones, that need closed
  • Constant high or rising fever
  • Migraine headaches that don’t improve
  • Uncontrolled vomiting or diarrhea
  • Bronchitis
  • Allergies and asthma
  • Cold and flu
  • Minor infections, like bladder, sinus, or pink eye
  • Rash or sunburns
  • Sprains and strains
  • Back and neck pain
  • Muscle or body aches
  • Earache
  • Strep throat
  • Minor cuts
  • Minor work illness or injuries

 

It’s not always easy to know if you should go to the emergency room, especially when you need to act fast. The key is to trust your judgment. If you believe your health is in serious danger, it’s an emergency.