Tag Archives: effects

Caffeine Awareness Month

Caffeine Awareness Month

It’s Caffeine Awareness Month, and we’ll have tips to help you make sure you’re using caffeine safely.

Caffeine is usually safe for adults, but pregnant women shouldn’t use it, and children should avoid it.

Up to 400 mg of caffeine a day is usually safe for healthy adults. That’s about 4 cups of brewed coffee, 10 cans of cola, or 2 energy shots.

How Much Caffeine is Safe?

 

While the caffeine in 10 cans of cola is still at a safe limit, it would have over 90 teaspoons of sugar. You should be shooting for no more than 6 teaspoons of sugar a day. Be aware of the sugar you take in with your caffeine.

Watching Sugar with Caffeine

 

Avoid mixing caffeine with other substances like alcohol. Their effects can compound each another, making them more dangerous.

Avoid Mixing Caffeine

 

You may want to cut back on caffeine if you’re experiencing side effects like migraines, insomnia, nervousness and restlessness, a fast or uneven heatbeat, or jittery muscle tremors.

Side Effects of Caffeine

 

Caffeine usually takes an effect on most people within 15 to 45 minutes, so don’t drink more just because you don’t immediately feel its effects.

Caffeine Takes Effect

 

Caffeine isn’t safe for dogs, so don’t let them get into chocolate or caffeinated drinks.

Caffeine and Dogs

Act Happy Week

Act Happy Week

Next week is Act Happy Week, and happiness can affect your health more than you realize.

Live for the Day

 

Believe it or not, the effects of positive thinking can actually improve your health and happiness.

Positive Thinking Grows

 

Positive thinking lowers depression and distress and is tied to handling stress well.

Positive thinking is also tied to longer life spans, greater resistance to the common cold, and better heart health.

Active and Happy

 

Positive and optimistic thinkers also tend to live healthier lifestyles, with more physical activity and a healthier diet.

Act Happy for a Healthier Lifestyle

 

Practice makes perfect. Try putting things in positive terms. “I’ve never done it before” becomes “I can learn something new.”

Setting Hopeful Goals

 

Humor can help. Give yourself permission to laugh, especially at difficult times, which can help lower your stress.

Laughter as the Best Medicine

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Sleep for the Whole Family

Long View: Take Time to Rest Easy, Don’t Skip Sleep

I know we all think about ways to carve out more time in our busy lives, and I’m sure we’d all like to be more efficient. Sometimes I think getting by on less sleep is the way to go, but after looking into it, there are some problems with that solution.

There are lots of reasons you might not get enough sleep—illness, stress, family commitments, and job issues. Bad sleep habits, like irregular schedules and eating too much before bed, can lead to insomnia whether or not you’re actually trying to skip sleep. The causes of a bad night’s sleep seem endless, and so do the effects. But your primary care doctor can get you started on the right path to better sleep.

I can’t close my eyes to the fact that my sleep habits aren’t always the best, but I try to maintain a regular schedule. Typically, I read a few pages from a book with a serene topic before I drift off. For a while, I was concerned about afternoon drowsiness until I was able to tie the symptoms to carb loading at lunch. I also took a medicine that had vivid dreams as a possible side effect. My dreams are vivid enough as is. The medicine made them unbearable, so my doctor and I decided we would take another path.

My friend Karen Stefaniak is our wellness program administrator here at Health Alliance. She shared her knowledge on sleep.

“Recent studies are linking reduced sleep duration—five hours or less—to weight gain,” Stefaniak says. “Not getting enough sleep affects the two hormones that tell us when to eat and when to stop eating. People who are sleep-deprived produce more ghrelin, the hormone that tells us when to eat, and less leptin, the hormone that tells us when to stop. Plus, when we don’t get enough sleep, our metabolism slows down, and we tend to crave high-carbohydrate foods that provide a quick energy boost.”

So are we actually helping ourselves at all by sleeping less? Probably not. It lowers our waking quality of life and increases our risk for accidents, and it even makes us want to eat more. I think I need to consider a good night’s sleep a necessity rather than a luxury. You can rest easy knowing I will pay more attention to my sleep habits going forward.