Tag Archives: doctors visits

National Influenza Vaccination Week

National Influenza Vaccination Week

This week was National Influenza Vaccination Week. The flu shot is the best tool to protect you and your family.

Struggling Through the Flu

 

The flu causes millions of illnesses, hundreds of thousands of hospitalizations, and thousands of deaths every season. Get your shot today!

Avoid Getting Sick with the Shot

 

More than 132.7 million people have already gotten their flu shots. If your kids are over 6 months, protect them now!

Protect Your Kids From the Flu

 

Flu shots are the best way to avoid seasonal doctors’ visits, missed work and school, and to prevent hospitalizations.

Avoid Flu Season Woes

 

The flu can be a serious danger to your health, especially to those under 6 months old, pregnant women, and the elderly. Protect yourself now!

Our blogger overcame her fear of the flu shot. Let her story remind you why you need yours.

As a Health Alliance member, your flu shot is covered, so there’s no reason not to get yours today!

You're Covered, So Feel Better!

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AEP Autumn

Vantage Point: It’s That Time of Year

Days are warm and evenings crisp. Orchards bustle during the pear and apple harvest. It is my favorite time of year, but for seniors it can be stressful because of Medicare’s Annual Enrollment Period (AEP), which runs from October 15 through December 7. This is the time of year when most Medicare beneficiaries can choose or change their Medicare coverage.

Better-than-ever health care coupled with healthier lifestyles means people are living longer. With that, living on a fixed income means many seniors worry about having affordable health care for years to come.

One of the most common questions we hear in our Wenatchee office is, “What is the difference between a Medicare Supplement and Medicare Advantage plan (also known as Part C)?” Learning about each product can help people understand what best fits their lifestyles, pocket books, and health care needs.

Whether choosing a Supplement or Advantage plan, you must continue to pay your part B premium.

Medicare Supplements work much like a secondary insurance. They pick up their share of the covered health care cost after Medicare pays, depending on what plan you purchase. For example, it may pick up 10 percent of the 20 percent coinsurance (meaning you would still pay 10 percent). Supplements will not cover any cost Medicare denies, and some Supplements require medical underwriting to gauge the health of the individual. Premiums, or the cost you pay for the coverage each month, are generally more expensive. Like with Original Medicare, you can see any doctor who accepts Medicare.

Medicare Advantage plans replace Original Medicare, which means hospital and doctor visits are paid directly by the plan. Many Advantage plans also include prescription coverage making for one tidy package. To be clear, you still keep all your Medicare benefits. There is no medical underwriting, and premiums are generally lower. Advantage plans also cover extras that Medicare does not, like dental and fitness programs. They also work closely with provider offices to help coordinate care. This helps many members stay healthier. Advantage plans have contracts with provider offices so a member normally must chose a doctor within the plan’s network.

Health Alliance takes Medicare seriously, and our Wenatchee office and helpful customer service representatives are a resource you can count on to help make a great decision for you during AEP and beyond.

Visit us at 316 S. Fifth St. in Wenatchee from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m., weekdays. Or call 1-877-561-1463, TTY 711, from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. daily. That looks like a toll-free number, but our local representatives are on the other end waiting to help.

Schedule Your Doctor's Appointment

Getting the Most Out of Your Doctor’s Appointment

Scheduling Your Doctor’s Appointment

Prevention is important to maintaining good health, so it is important to know what you need each year at your doctor’s appointment.

Blood Pressure

This should happen at every doctor’s appointment, even if you don’t currently have high blood pressure, to track your levels over time.

Flu Shot

This yearly shot protects you and those you care about from the flu.

Yearly Blood Tests

You should get these blood tests at your yearly physical doctor’s appointment:

Microalbumin

This yearly test can detect early signs of kidney damage.

Dental Exam

You should set up this kind of doctor’s appointment with your dentist every 6 months for a regular cleaning.

Dilated Eye Exam

This yearly doctor’s appointment is when your eye doctor puts eye drops into your pupil so they can get a better view of the back of your eye.

Pneumococcal Shot

This one-time shot prevents blood, brain, and lung infections, like pneumonia, caused by a certain bacteria.

HbA1c

Those with diabetes should have this test at doctor’s appointments 2 to 4 times a year to help track their blood sugar levels long-term.

Foot Exam

This should happen at every doctor’s appointment for those with diabetes.

At Your Doctor’s Appointment

Ask for help.

Never be afraid to ask your doctor for advice. They want to help you be your best!

  • Prepare – Organize your questions ahead of time, and feel free to write them down if you’re afraid of forgetting anything.
  • Be Specific – Detailed information can help your doctor make your treatment plan and make sure it is working for you.
  • Tell the Truth – Be honest and direct with your doctor. Sharing information about how you feel will help you stay healthy.

Ask questions.

Not sure what to ask at your doctor’s appointment? Here are some questions to get you started:

  • What’s my blood pressure, cholesterol, and health goals?
  • How frequently should I check my blood pressure?
  • What lifestyle changes can I make to lower my blood pressure and cholesterol? Should I start a healthy diet or exercise plan?
  • What are the common side effects of my meds? Will any of my other meds, supplements, or foods interact with any of my meds?

Stay calm.

Do you get nervous or anxious when you go to doctor’s appointments? You’re not alone, and it can actually cause your blood pressure to rise while you’re there. Research shows that about 20% of patients with mild cases of high blood pressure see their blood pressure rise at doctor’s appointments. This is sometimes called white-coat syndrome.

Track your blood pressure at home and compare readings with those taken in the office to see if this is happening to you. Take these readings with you to your next doctor’s appointment and talk to them about it to make sure they get an accurate account of your blood pressure.

And once they know, your doctor can also help calm your fears, like by explaining exactly what they’re doing as they go.