Tag Archives: doctor’s office visits

Making Sense of BMI

Vantage Point: BMI – The Number of Dread

If you’ve ever had to step on a scale (begrudgingly) at the doctor’s office, you know that based on that scale’s number, the following conversation with your doctor may be about your body mass index (BMI).

For many years, as my age and weight increased, I wanted to hear less and less about this number. Not only did I already know that I had gained more than a few pounds, I was also very aware that my numbers (A1C, BMI, etc.) probably weren’t where they needed to be.

And honestly, I didn’t want to hear it! Luckily, my A1C surprised me. It was great. But my BMI could be better.

BMI is divided into these categories:

  • Underweight = Less than 18.5 BMI
  • Normal Weight = 18.5 to 24.9 BMI
  • Overweight = 25 to 29.9 BMI
  • Obesity = BMI of 30 or greater

So why get your BMI checked? Because for most people, it can provide a baseline for predicting the likelihood of developing serious illnesses in the future. We’re talking type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and certain types of cancer, just to name a few.

Reba Karr, our quality improvement coordinator, says, “There’s not a lot any of us can do to change our height, gender, or age. But even a modest weight loss, between 5% and 10% of your current body weight, can have a strong impact on overall health. If you combined calorie reduction with a gradual increase in exercise, such as walking, you can enhance the improvement more rapidly.”

The next time you see your doctor, have them check your BMI just to start the conversation about specific actions you could be taking to improve it. You can also visit our health and wellness resources for more info on weight management.

 

Breck Obermeyer is a community liaison with Health Alliance Northwest, serving Yakima County. She is a small-town girl from Naches and has a great husband who can fix anything and 2 kids who are her world.

Migraine and Headache Awareness Month

Migraine and Headache Awareness Month

June is Migraine and Headache Awareness Month! Headaches are actually common for children. Do you know how to help?

Rule Your Headache

 

Between 4% and 10% of kids get migraines, and most adults with migraines started getting them as kids.

Children Get Headaches Too!

 

Migraines usually run in the family, so knowing how they affect your family can help you and your doctor find the right treatment.

Migraines can stop you from participating in life’s activities and can be a significant health problem. Talk to your doctor!

Headaches Affecting Your Life

 

There are many types of headaches. Read more about them to identify yours.

What's Your Headache?

 

There are many kinds of treatment available for headaches, including preventive treatment. Learn more.

Getting Help with Headaches

 

Only 1 in 3 migraine sufferers talk to their doctor about them. Getting diagnosed can get you the treatment you need to improve your life.

Baby Feet

Before the Burp Cloths, Learn These Baby Basics

If you or someone you love has had a baby, you know the joys that come with being pregnant. Soon-to-be moms and dads might also be nervous about what their health plan covers.

Heather Miller knows. Her team in our call center gets lots of questions from soon-to-be parents.

And she just gave birth to her son Kolton.

If she didn’t know the ins and outs from working at a health plan, Heather says she would have questions, too.

“My first questions would be, ‘Are my visits covered? What about my sonograms?’” she said.

Here’s what Heather says members need to know.

Before the baby is born, we cover:

  • Doctor’s office visits
  • Lab work
  • Sonograms

After the baby is born, we cover:

  • Being in the hospital (48 hours, or 96 hours after a C-section)
  • Most lab work
  • Follow-up visits

New parents typically have 31 days to add their newborn to their plan. Once they have, the baby is covered beginning on the date of birth.

Heather says to review your policy or log in at YourHealthAlliance.org for more details. If you still have questions, call the number on the back of your ID card.

“You’ll feel a little less nervous when you know what your plan covers before you start setting up those pre-baby visits,” she said.