Tag Archives: disease

GERD Awareness Week

GERD Awareness Week

This week is Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease, or GERD Awareness Week. Do you have chronic heartburn?

Heartburn Sufferers

 

Regular acid reflux and heartburn are the most common symptoms of GERD. Learn more.

Burning Pain

 

GERD could be affecting you, and it has costs.

The Costs of GERD

 

How can you control GERD this holiday season?

Controlling GERD for the Holidays

 

GERD can impact your health in many ways, including sleep. Learn more.

GERD and Sleep

 

GERD is a disease. It’s not caused by your lifestyle. Learn about living with it.

There are a variety of options to help treat your GERD. Talk to your doctor at your next appointment.

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Diabetes Resources and Treatment

National Diabetes Month

November is National Diabetes Month, and now’s the time to raise awareness and protect yourself.

86 million Americans are at risk of developing diabetes. Learn how you can protect yourself starting at home.

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This month is also Diabetic Eye Disease Month. ‪‎Diabetes‬ is the #1 cause of new blindness in adults. Learn more.

Eye Exams and Diabetes

 

Understanding your diabetes can be kind of like football, from U.S. News and World Report.

Visit our diabetes section to learn more about taking care of you or your family’s disease.

Diabetes is more common and more serious than many Americans realize. Protect yourself now.

Diabetes by the Numbers

 

You can help stop type 2 diabetes in its tracks with smart shopping and eating. Find resources from the American Diabetes Association to get started.

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Exercise is an important part of taking care of and preventing diabetes. Programs like this can help, from NPR.

Interested in learning more about diabetes from our different partners’ health experts? Check out our events page for presentations and videos.

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Learning About Your Health for Health Literacy Month

Health Literacy Month

October is also Health Literacy Month, which helps people find info and services in health situations. Learn more.

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Community organizations help educate and support. Find education and resources.

Computer and Book

 

Are you a doctor or organization? Improve your ability to help with health literacy training.

Working at conference

 

Talk to your doctor to learn about protecting your health through prevention, and know what’s covered.

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Learn more about your disease, behavioral disorder, or treatment.

doctor hands holding white pack and pills

 

Do you understand insurance terms? They play a big role in taking care of your health. We can help.

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National Psoriasis Awareness Month

National Psoriasis Awareness Month

August is National Psoriasis Awareness Month, and 7.5 million people are living with it now, and 30% will develop psoriatic arthritis.

And 59% of people with psoriasis report it’s a problem in their everyday life. Learn more.

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Psoriasis is an autoimmune disease that causes red, scaly patches on the skin, and 52% of those who have it aren’t satisfied with treatment.

Psoriasis on elbow. Medical treatment

 

33% of those suffering from psoriasis report social interactions are hurt by their disease.

Businessman applying sun screen

 

72% of psoriasis sufferers are overweight or obese, which increases their risk of having it on top of other chronic conditions.

Psoriasis is more common than you know. Pop icon Cyndi Lauper started talking about her own psoriasis in July. You’re not alone.

Volksstimme Fotos Ausgabe SAW

 

Are you newly diagnosed? The National Psoriasis Foundation has a psoriasis One-on-One to help you talk to someone who understands.

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Looking to learn more about psoriasis treatment, research, or to get involved? The National Psoriasis Foundation’s Free Health Webcasts can help.

Beautiful girl applying cream on legs

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Fighting for Fitness with Exercise

My Healthy Journey: Time to Sweat

I’ve changed my diet, organized my life, and made healthier choices, so the last and biggest thing on the list is exercise.

I don’t like to exercise, as I think a lot of us don’t. I’m competitive, so I liked playing sports as a kid, but as an adult, exercising by myself is boring and hard work. If I had a gym membership and could read on a treadmill, it might be different. But as it is, it’s hard to make myself do it.

But if I can (for the most part) give up candy, completely abandon soda, and stop drinking coffee for a month, I can handle anything!

I started by doing a muscle-strengthening yoga routine every day, which was a great way to start for me. It wasn’t too intense, it was calming, and it really helped me regain some flexibility and balance I’d lost over the years.

Now, I’ve been doing P90X. I don’t know if you’ve heard of it, but it used to have infomercials on TV, which automatically makes me suspicious. But I actually know a number of people who have done it, and my goal is less to get a killer six-pack and more to get in better shape, so I don’t really need it to live up to all its TV promises.

I borrowed the DVDs from a friend, so I didn’t spend all of the money they’re talking about. I’m also not following all of their meal plans or the exact exercise plan. Each day you’re supposed to do a different workout for a different part of your body, and they’re each about an hour and a half long with warmups and cool downs.

I usually can’t make it through the whole thing yet; they’re really difficult! I also do them more like every other day because I’m so sore the day after. They make you pour sweat, and they make you want to lie on the ground in your own sweat puddle to catch your breath.

But I can already see some improvements! And that’s really satisfying. Am I out running yet? No (it’s been so rainy!). But I am getting cardio and strengthening done, in my own bedroom no less.

Plus, I’ve found some new interests by doing them. For instance, there’s a kickboxing workout that I love, so maybe in the future, I might try kickboxing classes!

Do I think I’ll stick with this level of workout forever? Definitely no! Eventually, I’d like to mix things like this up with other activities, like yoga, runs, and more simple workouts. Once it’s a habit, it will really be more about doing something every day.

It’s all about finding the things that will keep you interested, engaged, and MOVING.

There are so many reasons (and studies on) why you should  exercise. Mayo Clinic breaks it down perfectly: Exercise controls weight, fights health conditions and diseases, improves your mood, boosts your energy, and helps you sleep.

And Rally, our wellness tool, knows how important it is, too. It has tons of great missions to get you moving, like exercise 30 minutes every day, work up a sweat 3x a week, swim 30 minutes, and work your core, as well as weightlifting and walking missions.

So to help you get on a great fitness track that will entertain you and doesn’t require an expensive package, I’ve rounded up some activities for you to try for some of these missions.

Exercise 30 Minutes Every Day

43 Workouts That Allow You to Watch An Ungodly Amount of Television
100 No-Equipment Workouts

Work Up a Sweat 3x a Week

PopSugar Workout Music
Top 100 Running Songs

Run 30 Minutes

7 Easy Ways to Become a Runner
Beginner’s Running Guide
3 Methods to Run Faster

Swim 30 Minutes

The Ultimate Pool Workout
6 Tips to Improve Your Swimming Right Now
Make A Splash Infographic

Swimming's Benefits Infographic
Image via MyMedicalForum

Work Your Core

10-Minute Core-Blasting Pilates Workout

Quick Workout for a Powerful Core
Image via Buzzfeed’s 9 Quick Total Body Workouts

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The Scope of Multiple Sclerosis

Multiple Sclerosis Education Month

March is also Multiple Sclerosis Education Month, so as we wrapped the month up, we gave you info about the disease.

MS is a disease of the central nervous system, which interferes with communication between the brain and the body, and anyone can get it.

MS affects approximately 2.3 million people worldwide, but the disease isn’t consistently tracked and reported in the U.S.

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MS causes pain, extreme fatigue, and hurts vision, balance, walking. memory, concentration, and mood, and can cause problems as serious as paralysis.

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There are medications shown to slow MS, but no cure. There isn’t even a one course of diagnosis, like a lab test.

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This is a pivotal time in MS that shows how far research has come. Learn more about the disease’s history.

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Make a donation, find an event, and advocate for change and make a difference in the fight against MS.

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Are you currently fighting MS? Get support and help by finding a National Multiple Sclerosis Society Chapter near you.

You'll never be without support

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Rifling Through the History of Diabetes

The History of Diabetes