Tag Archives: director

Honoring Our Veterans

Long View: Remember Veterans this Independence Day

Independence Day is almost a month away, but I am already looking forward to it because—you guessed it—the food. Barbecued chicken and ribs, potato salad, and deviled eggs, all in the same meal? It’s almost too good to be true. However, the holiday also moves me beyond just my stomach.

To mark the day, I hang the American flag on the front porch if it’s not raining. This simple act always reminds me of the many service members who have helped defend our nation. Being in the military must be a very challenging experience, so I am thankful there are resources available to military personnel after they serve. One such resource is the U.S. Department of Veterans’ Affairs.

Local veteran service officers can help veterans navigate the many useful programs offered in their area. The resources they offer include help finding employment, starting or continuing an education ,or launching a small business. The U.S. Department of Veterans’ Affairs also helps people who are transitioning from active duty to civilian life, which can be a complicated process.

The U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs website features an easy-to-navigate section on health topics. Some are of general interest (like cataracts), while others are topics of specific interest to service members (like readjustment counseling). One of the department’s more pressing challenges is to provide support for homeless veterans or recently discharged service members. The National Coalition for Homeless Veterans estimates that about 12% of homeless people at any given time in the U.S. are veterans.

One local group that’s fighting homelessness is C-U at Home. Executive Director Melany Jackson and her dedicated volunteers support our most vulnerable homeless citizens. Their annual fundraiser, One Winter Night, encourages public service figures, community leaders, business leaders, academic leaders, and other community members to spend the night outside in a cardboard box.

“The percentage of homeless veterans has not diminished in recent years,” Melany told me. “They typically face complex situations that need to be addressed. We strive to match them with the many services available in our area. The public awareness and donations generated by our event helps us fund this very important work.”

I know many of you have served in the military or have friends and family who have served. Health Alliance Medicare thanks all those who have protected this country and allow us to continue celebrating Independence Day. This year I plan on being more about the flag and less about the food.

Community Care

Vantage Point: North Central Washington Cares

At a North Central Washington event I heard someone say, “Show me a community, a place where people care for their elders, and I will show you a good place to live.” Whether I am going to a senior networking forum in Chelan, Douglas, Grant, or Okanogan counties, conducting Medicare education, visiting one of our provider offices or collaborating on a fun event, I find NCW continues to grow as a place that recognizes, respects, and strives to enhance the quality of life for our seniors.

I recently had an opportunity to listen as Bruce Buckles, Aging and Adult Care of Central Washington’s executive director, presented on federal and state policies that impact seniors and adults with disabilities. Afterwards, I realized that with a rapidly aging population, as well as the daunting costs of diseases, such as Alzheimer’s, it is more important than ever to support programs that care for and benefit the aging.

We can’t always control what happens with laws, but on the local level, it’s a privilege for Health Alliance Medicare to partner with lots of outstanding, proactive agencies in caring for our seniors.

This month, Health Alliance Medicare is honored to join many other Grant County senior networking agencies to hold the inaugural Columbia Basin All-Senior Expo and Picnic. The free event will include a catered lunch, fitness demonstrations, raffles, door prizes, education, and fun entertainment all to celebrate Grant County seniors.

I have a favorite saying, “Regard the small as important and make much of little,” so I was excited when I saw a toddler, just starting out in life, looking up at a stage taller than herself and mirroring the steps of seniors at a Stay Active and Independent for Life geriatric fall prevention class during a recent health fair.

May we always look up to our elders, recognize and respect what they have to teach us and remember we are also aging and have the power today to help strengthen our communities by making sure we have adequate resources, programs, and health care. If we can do that, there is no doubt NCW will continue to thrive as a good place to live and age.

Health Alliance On-Call for You

Like New Nurse Line, This Director is Always On-Call

Jane Elliott lives and breathes Health Alliance. She has for years.

“My work is my hobby. We have so many great things going on. Leading efforts to help members doesn’t feel like work to me,” said Jane, Quality & Medical Management director.

Jane also loves our new 24-hour Anytime Nurse Line. Beginning July 1, all Health Alliance members can call 1-855-802-4612 to get help:

• Deciding if they need to see a doctor right away or set up a visit
• Coping with diabetes, asthma, high blood pressure, high cholesterol, and more
• Finding health care resources

Jane also played a key role in enhancing our wellness benefit. But, she and her team want members to know that if they go in for a wellness visit, they could still get a bill. Adding non-wellness needs into this appointment could result in costs.

”Your doctor might ask, ‘Do you have other things you’d like to talk about?'” she said. “This may lead to topics  that aren’t part of the free wellness benefit.”

To make sure your visit is covered as part of the free wellness benefit, Jane says be clear with your doctor about this appointment up front.

“Tell your doctor you want to focus on your wellness needs. If non-wellness needs come up that aren’t urgent, you can set up a follow-up visit,” she said.

Jane also knows wellness means a healthy work-life balance, even if  the lines blur when she works outside standard work  hours.

“I’m very family-focused, and I feel Health Alliance and our members are part of my extended family,” she said.

Moving Day

Long View: Tough Talks Now Can Save Hurt Feelings Later

Did you ever notice how much stuff you have packed in your house? It seems to have a life of its own! There was a point where I thought, “If I bring one more thing home, something will pop out of an upstairs window.” The thought of moving with all these treasures in tow is daunting. Imagine if you had to do so without notice or against your wishes. That would be a nightmare.

Sadly, some of our older friends and family members find themselves in that situation. They need to transition suddenly from independent living to a group or assisted-living facility, whether the move is short-term or permanent.

It seems talking about this tough situation ahead of time could save a lot of pain later.

There are some early signs that it is time to talk about moving options. Trouble getting dressed or not being able to make food are a couple of warnings that a change is in order. Sudden changes in behavior or severe forgetfulness are more alarming, and require fast action to protect your loved one.

Rosanna McLain is the director of the Senior Resource Center at Family Services of Champaign County. She advises, “Get your family member to his or her doctor so the cause of the changes can be determined, and then develop a plan of action. It’s best to talk about their wishes before the need is there.

“It’s tough to bring up sometimes, but our family members should be the drivers of their lives and make their wishes known ahead of time. Remember, you can find caregiver support programs at local senior centers and Area Agencies on Aging. Experienced specialists can help guide you through difficult times like these, so give them a call.”

There you have it. It wouldn’t hurt for all of us to plan for the future. Simplifying our lives and possessions as we go along is probably the best plan. I intend to clean out the junk room this spring. Of course I’ve had the same plan for the last three springs. Wish me luck tackling those treasures.